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mmd
08-01-2017, 10:39 AM
I think it is time to have a bit of a distraction from the incessant sound of political footfalls that sound like "Trump, Trump, Trump..." Post photos of your favourite figurehead, trailboards, or other ship's carvings, be they patriotic, mythical, amusing, or just plain mind-boggling. I'll start with a mind-boggling example of over-the-top carvings on a replica of a 17th-century Spanish galleon:

https://st.depositphotos.com/2115371/3097/i/950/depositphotos_30974903-stock-photo-the-old-warship.jpg

mmd
08-01-2017, 10:52 AM
And one that I have a connection to, the stern badge of the replica Herreshoff "Bounty" design, Catriona, designed by the late marine artist William Gilkerson and carved by Don Wilson of Lunenburg Chiselworks:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/600x315/bf/32/67/bf3267bc68535d026d458ed36b7c3824.jpg

amish rob
08-01-2017, 10:55 AM
Still waiting for that over the top galleon. :)

Peace,
Robert

mmd
08-01-2017, 10:58 AM
Slow download?

amish rob
08-01-2017, 11:01 AM
Slow download?
:d

That thing looks like a Taoist temple. :)

Peace,
Robert

SKIP KILPATRICK
08-01-2017, 11:01 AM
Love it!

The Mariners’ Museum in Newport News has a wonderful figurehead collection. I have some photos from my last visit I'll try to post them later. I can't retrieve them on this computer.

Nicholas Scheuer
08-01-2017, 11:26 AM
One would think that after the Spaniards had to repair an early ship which survived a gun battle at sea they would avoid investing the effort reflected in the OP.

mmd
08-01-2017, 11:31 AM
You'd think that, wouldn't you? But when you have shiploads of stolen gold, the urge to flaunt your wealth seems irrepressible.

sharpiefan
08-01-2017, 12:29 PM
From Moby Dick (1956) (LINK) (http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0049513/),

Father Mapple's Pulpit is fun:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-FbeRlg8xyO0/Uf0_6eVqV9I/AAAAAAAAeSY/P5OLPIacLe8/s1600/MobyDick_039Pyxurz.jpg

and the expression on Pequod's Figurehead (LINK) has always intrigued me.
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NwWOs-5NWus/Uf1E0l-21jI/AAAAAAAAeUo/1fjD9sb0Oyw/s1600/MobyDick_092Pyxurz.jpg (https://youtube.com/watch?v=hdiFYCUP9oU&t=163)

hawkeye54
08-01-2017, 01:33 PM
I can't wait until Jay Greer 'discovers' this thread !

Rick

varadero
08-01-2017, 10:40 PM
i think it is time to have a bit of a distraction from the incessant sound of political footfalls that sound like "trump, trump, trump..." post photos of your favourite figurehead, trailboards, or other ship's carvings, be they patriotic, mythical, amusing, or just plain mind-boggling. I'll start with a mind-boggling example of over-the-top carvings on a replica of a 17th-century spanish galleon:

https://st.depositphotos.com/2115371/3097/i/950/depositphotos_30974903-stock-photo-the-old-warship.jpg

genoa??

ishmael
08-02-2017, 06:45 AM
The Pequod, in the John Huston directed Moby Dick, also had a lot of whale parts on display, I believe in keeping with Melville's descriptions in the novel. Chocks of sperm whale teeth, and helm with a whale's jaw bone for the tiller. Tiller steering on a whale ship? Dunno.

And yeah, all that stolen gold made Spain a world power, for a bit. Power tends to love ostentation! Just look at Versailles, or for that matter some of Trump's digs.

sharpiefan
08-02-2017, 10:22 AM
The Pequod, in the John Huston directed Moby Dick, also had a lot of whale parts on display, I believe in keeping with Melville's descriptions in the novel. Chocks of sperm whale teeth, and helm with a whale's jaw bone for the tiller. Tiller steering on a whale ship? Dunno.

And yeah, all that stolen gold made Spain a world power, for a bit. Power tends to love ostentation! Just look at Versailles, or for that matter some of Trump's digs.


You may have seen many a quaint craft in your day, for aught I
know;—square-toed luggers; mountainous Japanese junks; butter-box
galliots, and what not; but take my word for it, you never saw such a
rare old craft as this same rare old Pequod. She was a ship of the old
school, rather small if anything; with an old-fashioned claw-footed look
about her. Long seasoned and weather-stained in the typhoons and calms
of all four oceans, her old hull’s complexion was darkened like a
French grenadier’s, who has alike fought in Egypt and Siberia. Her
venerable bows looked bearded. Her masts—cut somewhere on the coast of
Japan, where her original ones were lost overboard in a gale—her masts
stood stiffly up like the spines of the three old kings of Cologne.
Her ancient decks were worn and wrinkled, like the pilgrim-worshipped
flag-stone in Canterbury Cathedral where Becket bled. But to all these
her old antiquities, were added new and marvellous features, pertaining
to the wild business that for more than half a century she had followed.
Old Captain Peleg, many years her chief-mate, before he commanded
another vessel of his own, and now a retired seaman, and one of the
principal owners of the Pequod,—this old Peleg, during the term of his
chief-mateship, had built upon her original grotesqueness, and inlaid
it, all over, with a quaintness both of material and device, unmatched
by anything except it be Thorkill-Hake’s carved buckler or bedstead.
She was apparelled like any barbaric Ethiopian emperor, his neck heavy
with pendants of polished ivory. She was a thing of trophies. A cannibal
of a craft, tricking herself forth in the chased bones of her enemies.
All round, her unpanelled, open bulwarks were garnished like one
continuous jaw, with the long sharp teeth of the sperm whale, inserted
there for pins, to fasten her old hempen thews and tendons to. Those
thews ran not through base blocks of land wood, but deftly travelled
over sheaves of sea-ivory. Scorning a turnstile wheel at her reverend
helm, she sported there a tiller; and that tiller was in one mass,
curiously carved from the long narrow lower jaw of her hereditary foe.
The helmsman who steered by that tiller in a tempest, felt like the
Tartar, when he holds back his fiery steed by clutching its jaw. A noble
craft, but somehow a most melancholy!


Moby Dick (free download LINK) (http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2701)