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Paul Pless
06-16-2017, 03:34 PM
http://www.trbimg.com/img-57350005/turbine/bal-pridea1-20020405

SMARTINSEN
06-16-2017, 03:52 PM
You gotta come down here in October fo Downrigging weekend and we will get woxbox and anyone else (looking at you cwsmith) and we will go out for a ride on the POB.

Tom Montgomery
06-16-2017, 03:58 PM
The first Pride of Baltimore that went down in a powerful North Atlantic squall on May 14, 1986 with the loss of her captain and three crew.

A stunningly beautiful rig IMO. But she was too faithful a reproduction of the early 19th century Baltimore clipper type than modern concepts of seaworthiness and safety will tolerate. I remember reading a remark by Phil Bolger that ships of that era had lives that lasted, on average, only as long as a modern automobile. I believe, if I am not mistaken, that Bolger was referring to the John F. Leavitt fiasco.

The account of her short life and the details of the reasons for her demise in Daniel S. Parrott's book Tall Ships Down is fascinating. I highly recommend the book.

CWSmith
06-16-2017, 04:09 PM
You gotta come down here in October fo Downrigging weekend and we will get woxbox and anyone else (looking at you cwsmith) and we will go out for a ride on the POB.

Thank you. I love The Pride! I remember going down to Harbor Place to watch them build the first Pride. That is such a beautiful boat!

Tom Montgomery
06-16-2017, 04:12 PM
An excerpt from the book:


As fondly as the Pride is remembered by many, the vessel's less flattering characteristics were well-known to those who sailed her. In particular, elements of the hull and rig flexed and shifted dramatically in a seaway, earning her the nickname of "Flexible Flyer." When sailing to windward it was not uncommon to see a steady stream of seawater passing one's bunk on its way to the bilge and back into the ocean by means of the hourly pumpout. Bilges were typically pumped by hand, but a crew member recalls on one occasion running the mechanical bilge pump twenty minutes each hour to keep pace. In terms of the rig, by the time Pride sailed to Europe in 1985 she was on her third jibboom, one of which broke in conjunction with the fore topmast failing; on another occasion a bowsprit was replaced. These experiences may have been common enough aboard the privateers of old, but, if so, they represented a level of authenticity with which the Pride of Baltimore, Inc. was not entirely comfortable. Changes to the ship began to be made. Though all vessels go through a process of working out the kinks and addressing unforeseen needs, the process with Pride went beyond what might be considered typical or desirable, and it continued throughout her life.

Paul Pless
06-16-2017, 04:14 PM
You gotta come down here in October fo Downrigging weekend and we will get woxbox and anyone else (looking at you cwsmith) and we will go out for a ride on the POB.This I would love to do. I will do my best to get there for a few days.

Tom Montgomery
06-16-2017, 04:21 PM
My understanding is that the lessons learned from the tragic end of the replica Pride of Baltimore resulted in compromises to historical authenticity in the design of Pride of Baltimore II that have resulted in a longer-lived, safer, more seaworthy ship.

But MY GOD the original Pride of Baltimore was gorgeous!

Rich Jones
06-16-2017, 04:25 PM
I've got a print of POB II hanging on the wall that my wife gave as a present. She had no idea what boat it was, but just that it was "a pretty boat".

Breakaway
06-16-2017, 05:27 PM
What is the name of that sail flying on a spar/ extension attached to the aft end of the mains'l?

Kevin

Paul Pless
06-16-2017, 05:29 PM
Ringtail

Paul Pless
06-16-2017, 05:31 PM
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/cf/51/a1/cf51a1396fc995c00634bec236698c3d.jpg

Gerarddm
06-16-2017, 05:42 PM
#11: literally insane.

Somewhere there is an overhead pic of Running Tide with everything she's got flying, a very impressive sight. IIRC, chute, blooper, forestaysail, main, mizzen staysail, mizzen.