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Phillip Allen
06-13-2017, 10:56 PM
I've been watching some of your police chases and convinced that I could never drive on the left side of the road... very scary :)

BrianW
06-13-2017, 11:34 PM
Eh... I've done so in Scotland, Afghanistan (right hand drive, but American road rules. Also in Australia. You get used to it fast.

Norman Bernstein
06-14-2017, 09:10 AM
I drove in Ireland quite a bit, in the early 90's.... you DO get used to it, although it's nearly always on your mind, as you drive.

On my very first trip, I actually took a roundabout the wrong way... scared the crap out of one other car! :)

S.V. Airlie
06-14-2017, 09:42 AM
Maybe it's because I'm left handed. When I arrived in the UK just before school started, we had to take a driving test because part of out duties was to transport students to away games, even movies. I think the test usually took an hour and a half average. When my turn came up, I took to the road like a duck to water, natural. After about 45 minutes, my driving teacher, just another staff member, said to me that I drove better than he did and we can go home.

isla
06-14-2017, 11:25 AM
When any of my numerous American in-laws come to visit us they usually hire a car. It amuses the hell out of me to see whoever is driving always goes to the passenger side door, does a double take, then walks around to the driver's side. My father-in-law was hopeless, actually dangerous, but my mother-in-law was pretty much OK and insisted on doing most of the driving. Both now sadly deceased, but we still get nephews and nieces, my wife's old school friends and sundry distant relatives. They all do the wrong door thing.

S.V. Airlie
06-14-2017, 11:36 AM
When any of my numerous American in-laws come to visit us they usually hire a car. It amuses the hell out of me to see whoever is driving always goes to the passenger side door, does a double take, then walks around to the driver's side. My father-in-law was hopeless, actually dangerous, but my mother-in-law was pretty much OK and insisted on doing most of the driving. Both now sadly deceased, but we still get nephews and nieces, my wife's old school friends and sundry distant relatives. They all do the wrong door thing.After being in the UK, the opposite was the case for me in the US. I was a holy terror on the road for a few days, still thinking I should be on the other side of the road.

Canoez
06-14-2017, 11:40 AM
When any of my numerous American in-laws come to visit us they usually hire a car. It amuses the hell out of me to see whoever is driving always goes to the passenger side door, does a double take, then walks around to the driver's side. My father-in-law was hopeless, actually dangerous, but my mother-in-law was pretty much OK and insisted on doing most of the driving. Both now sadly deceased, but we still get nephews and nieces, my wife's old school friends and sundry distant relatives. They all do the wrong door thing.

SWMBO who was born and grew up in the UK - and learned to drive there - refuses to let me drive when we go to visit. Her sister worked for a car rental firm and a mutual friend arranges the car hire for us.

(I do manage to get in the correct door!)

On the bright side, I've got a designated driver for pub lunches. Y>:D

isla
06-14-2017, 11:44 AM
On the bright side, I've got a designated driver for pub lunches. Y>:D

Way to go :d

lupussonic
06-14-2017, 11:53 AM
As a Brit driving in Europe these last 4 months, I'm the other way around. Still finding it hard to negotiate back to front motorway exits. I did survive the round a bout of death in Holland, twice, but only just, which is situated in Ridderkirk if you're interested.

I fearlessly drove a 6 tonne Unimog up a cobbled one way street in Schwandorf recently, I had to do a 29 point turn, scrunching the gears every time, to the cheers of cafe and pub drinkers sat out on the street terraces, along with various shouts of 'dumkopf Englander' and 'aaschloch', which I ignored with aplomb.

Smile and wave....

robm
06-14-2017, 12:37 PM
As one used to not only driving on the right, but driving on roads with 2 wide lanes, and shoulders, and all the bush cleared away for 10 m beside the road, and grades that are no more than 7%, I find the single track roads in rural England really scary. (Scotland not so much, as you can usually see cars coming for miles, especially up north.) And people drive them fast, too. They are way better drivers than I am.

On the other hand, I will drive a gravel logging main at 90 - 100 km/h, and not even think about it. But the road is wider, has better visibility, easier grades, and less traffic than most rural B roads in Britain.

S.V. Airlie
06-14-2017, 12:40 PM
As one used to not only driving on the right, but driving on roads with 2 wide lanes, and shoulders, and all the bush cleared away for 10 m beside the road, and grades that are no more than 7%, I find the single track roads in rural England really scary. (Scotland not so much, as you can usually see cars coming for miles, especially up north.) And people drive them fast, too. They are way better drivers than I am.

On the other hand, I will drive a gravel logging main at 90 - 100 km/h, and not even think about it. But the road is wider, has better visibility, easier grades, and less traffic than most rural B roads in Britain.Oh, Scotland has it's one lane tracks, biked there. Also, had free ranging sheep for a little excitement.

Peerie Maa
06-14-2017, 12:44 PM
, I find the single track roads in rural England really scary. (Scotland not so much, as you can usually see cars coming for miles, especially up north.)



That would be in those odd half hours of sunshine between the rain, the fog, the snow and night time. ;)

Canoez
06-14-2017, 01:20 PM
As one used to not only driving on the right, but driving on roads with 2 wide lanes, and shoulders, and all the bush cleared away for 10 m beside the road, and grades that are no more than 7%, I find the single track roads in rural England really scary. (Scotland not so much, as you can usually see cars coming for miles, especially up north.) And people drive them fast, too. They are way better drivers than I am.

On the other hand, I will drive a gravel logging main at 90 - 100 km/h, and not even think about it. But the road is wider, has better visibility, easier grades, and less traffic than most rural B roads in Britain.

We were driving through countryside not far from Stonehenge which included some 1-1/2 lane wide roads with hedgerows either side of the road punctuated with the occasional tank crossing. SWMBO was driving the rental BMW M3 and we managed to see and stop in time not to be run down by a massive coach filled with Japanese tourists. We pulled over so far that the passenger side was in the hedgerow as there was no convenient place to reverse to to get off the road. The coach took a section of the hedgerow on the opposite side of the road as it left.

isla
06-14-2017, 01:25 PM
That would be in those odd half hours of sunshine between the rain, the fog, the snow and night time. ;)

But bear in mind that this time of year, around Aberdeen, current sunrise/sunset times are 04:00 - 22:06 But we still get the rain, fog and even the occasional snow shower :eek:

robm
06-14-2017, 01:33 PM
I was in a bus on the A816 south of Oban recently. This is a nominally 2 lane road. No shoulders, trees meet over head, lots of traffic, including logging trucks. (Yes, in Scotland! It seems a lot of the plantations are ready to cut. I saw more clearcuts there than here in BC.) On a blind corner, we met a logging truck. Full-on crash stop on both sides. We backed up a bit, and the driver put the bus into the bushes on the left. The logging truck crept past. Missed the bus by about 2 inches. No way I would drive those roads. No wonder there are seatbelts on the buses there!

Joe (SoCal)
06-14-2017, 01:35 PM
Rode a scooter in Bermuda ( Sounds like a Jimmy Buffet song :D ) Anyway Left hand drive there. I watched many under the influence forget

Whameller
06-15-2017, 05:01 PM
Every country has its dangerous road aspects I think, it just depends on what you are used to. Things that have scared me:

- Priority to all traffic coming from the right in Germany (unless you are on a yellow diamond road)
- Roundabouts in France, where on some traffic entering has priority (the default setting) and on others traffic on the roundabout has priority but the 'Vous n'avez pas le priorite' signs are tiny.
- Low speed limits on the Trans Canadian Highway through Alberta; nearly killed myself falling asleep on a dead straight 40 mile section somewhere between Medicine Hat and Calgary in the early 80's, cruising at 55mph in fear of RCMP speed traps.
- (My favourite) The US-style, no-priority, 4 way intersection. A concept introduced to me by an MP who pulled me over in the Baghdad Green Zone. 'I want to see lug nuts, Sir !' to my total confusion (they are wheel nuts in English). An utterly crazy idea; I'm amazed more of you don't die on 4 ways !

PeterSibley
06-15-2017, 05:13 PM
Eh... I've done so in Scotland, Afghanistan (right hand drive, but American road rules. Also in Australia. You get used to it fast.

The problem is in an emergency Brian, on a narrow country road if something goes wrong I pull hard to the left, US drivers pull to the right automatically. If I meet a US driver in that situation we'll have a headon.

That happens here in this valley a couple of times a year with overseas tourists.

Phillip Allen
06-15-2017, 06:06 PM
Every country has its dangerous road aspects I think, it just depends on what you are used to. Things that have scared me:

- Priority to all traffic coming from the right in Germany (unless you are on a yellow diamond road)
- Roundabouts in France, where on some traffic entering has priority (the default setting) and on others traffic on the roundabout has priority but the 'Vous n'avez pas le priorite' signs are tiny.
- Low speed limits on the Trans Canadian Highway through Alberta; nearly killed myself falling asleep on a dead straight 40 mile section somewhere between Medicine Hat and Calgary in the early 80's, cruising at 55mph in fear of RCMP speed traps.
- (My favourite) The US-style, no-priority, 4 way intersection. A concept introduced to me by an MP who pulled me over in the Baghdad Green Zone. 'I want to see lug nuts, Sir !' to my total confusion (they are wheel nuts in English). An utterly crazy idea; I'm amazed more of you don't die on 4 ways !

the speed is low :)

The Bigfella
06-15-2017, 07:16 PM
Try riding in Asia. It doesn't matter what side of the road you use - you can expect to encounter what would be unexpected anywhere else in the world. This clip is central Java... last 30 seconds, nothing but vehicles driving on the wrong side of the road.

The most dangerous places are the border crossings for countries that drive on different sides - eg Thailand (left) and Laos (right). Lots of prangs occur within a few miles of the borders.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=St492G4VeoY

Phillip Allen
06-15-2017, 09:28 PM
Try riding in Asia. It doesn't matter what side of the road you use - you can expect to encounter what would be unexpected anywhere else in the world. This clip is central Java... last 30 seconds, nothing but vehicles driving on the wrong side of the road.

The most dangerous places are the border crossings for countries that drive on different sides - eg Thailand (left) and Laos (right). Lots of prangs occur within a few miles of the borders.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=St492G4VeoY

your driving is criminal at least

wizbang 13
06-15-2017, 09:57 PM
Switching right to left has never been a problem for me .
Turning on the wind shield wipers for the turn signals is problematic.

The Bigfella
06-15-2017, 10:49 PM
your driving is criminal at least

Have you been told lately?

A cop over there wouldn't even flutter an eyelid at anything on that tape. You give 'em a nod as you undertake them... and they'll ask you to pop a wheelie for them.