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Paul Pless
06-09-2017, 10:22 AM
Could the queen have said, "Hell no. You may not."?

And what then?

The Queen
06-09-2017, 10:34 AM
One should not ask the pleblians how they should like to be ruled in the first place, in our opinion.

Smile and wave always did it for my firm.

TomF
06-09-2017, 10:55 AM
It would prompt a Constitutional crisis if the Crown didn't first allow the party with the most seats to try.

With a "hung Parliament" the convention is to give the first option to form a Government to the party with the most seats - and it's their responsibility to attempt enough networking with other elected members to be able to get a majority of votes (demonstrating "the confidence of the House") on the kinds of legislative votes which are "confidence motions." But if the leader of the largest party can't get those votes, then other elected members can approach the Crown with their own proposals. Coalitions etc.

In principle, a leader can stay on until their government actually loses a confidence motion, though in practice that is rare. It is, however, an approach being tried just now in British Columbia.

isla
06-09-2017, 11:57 AM
^ What Tom said.

Phil Y
06-09-2017, 04:53 PM
Down here in Oz our conservative government is always a long established coalition of the liberal party and the country party. So I guess that the coalition go to the Governor General, who represents the queen, and asks permission to form government as a matter of course, even though the labour party might have won more seats than either of them on its own.

Gerarddm
06-09-2017, 05:27 PM
Incidentally, can't the Queen refuse to entertain our current president? And/or refuse his requested use of her coach?

Stiletto
06-09-2017, 07:50 PM
Incidentally, can't the Queen refuse to entertain our current president? And/or refuse his requested use of her coach?

She can do anything she likes, but in practice always defers to established protocols. If she was to decline the use of the coach, a suitably diplomatic reason would be found. I wonder if any refurbishment plans have been brought forward.;-)

PeterSibley
06-09-2017, 08:16 PM
So you don't really vote for your leaders do you? You vote for the party not the person?

That's a personal choice, policy or personality. Individuals get returned or sent to parliament, they in turn elect their leader, the Prime Minister, who ran be replaced as the elected party members choose.

john welsford
06-09-2017, 08:57 PM
So you don't really vote for your leaders do you? You vote for the party not the person?

Yes, but we have two votes. One for the party that we support, one for the local member who we support. Those can, and often are different parties. Mixed Member proportional is the system here, seems stable and at least reasonably representative of the electorate. http://www.elections.org.nz/voting-system/mmp-voting-system

Its different to the English, or even the system used by our Australian neighbours.

On voting for our leaders. Two things, one is that the leader of the party is the main spokesperson in an election so in a way we're electing our Prime Ministers, the other is that its not uncommon for a PM to be unseated by the members of the governing party for a variety of reasons and a new leader elected by the members of the governing party. Same happens when, such as recently here in NZ, our PM had been in office for most of three terms, resigned his position and a new PM was chosen. No fuss, no bother, just a bit of internal electioneering and a vote in caucus and the new PM announced next morning. Business as usual, hardly even a matter for headlines in the papers.


John Welsford

PeterSibley
06-09-2017, 09:00 PM
NZ probably has the best and most democratic electoral system in the world.

oznabrag
06-09-2017, 09:12 PM
One should not ask the pleblians how they should like to be ruled in the first place, in our opinion.

Smile and wave always did it for my firm.

12 minutes flat.

Really?

I figure Her Royal Highness has an ear in, but . . . Really?

Hi there!!!

Love the get-up!


Do tell us more!!!

Stiletto
06-09-2017, 09:52 PM
I figure Her Royal Highness has an ear in, but . . . Really?



Her Majesty, please!

Peerie Maa
06-10-2017, 06:46 AM
So you don't really vote for your leaders do you? You vote for the party not the person?

Correct. Not many British voters know this, hence the bleating about unelected PM's if one is replaced due to ill health, resignation or a leadership challenge.

Graeme Forrest
06-10-2017, 10:37 PM
I am not sure I agree Peter, I think the Single Transferable Vote (STV) system as I think you outlined a few days ago as used in Tasmania (and also Ireland) is far better that our Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) system we use. In our case half the MP's are not elected to be there, but are appointed by there Party to make up the proportionality decided by the Party vote at the election. At least with STV all members have been elected to be there and not just Party hacks.
For Americans, in parliamentary systems the leader of the country is the Prime Minister (or Premier)who is elected by Party members to be their leader, if their party wins the most seats in Parliament. In non Monarchies the elected President is largely a ceremonial position and holds no real executive power, similar to current Monarchies.