PDA

View Full Version : Are you older than dirt?



Norman Bernstein
06-01-2017, 07:01 AM
This one has been around for a while. For the record, the only one I don't remember is newsreels before the movie... all the others, though, were definitely part of my childhood.

https://scontent.fzty1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/18582639_1578681082193951_4749399765403278365_n.jp g?oh=f882b0e82521c1af89f6289cd60a5f4f&oe=59E17DEA

skuthorp
06-01-2017, 07:21 AM
Guilty…. apart from a few US things like green stamps. But I remember parafin in oblong tins that came in pairs in a wooden box, and lamps with wicks, and a wood/coal merchant/bottleoh with one arm that delivered by horse and cart. No TV, radio serials, the threat of polio……… but I lived in a small bush town with no power and a party line telephone that you had to wind to make a call.
But Aus. was a few years behind in such things as well.

Chris Coose
06-01-2017, 07:36 AM
Just a minute ago a co-worker who is 56 tells me I look 10 years younger than him.

I remember picking up the telephone and getting directly connected to an operator and giving her a telephone # with 2 letters to start off.
Remember party lines?

Garret
06-01-2017, 07:40 AM
A friend says he's older than rocks, because it takes rocks to make dirt...

My memory matches Norm's & I was on a 12 party line for a while - including the (seemingly required) old lady who would listen to everyone's calls.

S.V. Airlie
06-01-2017, 07:51 AM
Recognize or use? I recognize practically all of them but, never had a tel # prefix as mentioned. Had 8 people on our party line

Generally speaking, I'm old as dirt.

Norman Bernstein
06-01-2017, 07:57 AM
I recall our phone number, as a kid: Hunter 6 - 1128... and my Dad's business: Wabash 5-1774

bob winter
06-01-2017, 08:08 AM
A couple of them I don't remember but that is likely because the brands were not available where I lived. I do remember that the dairy delivery wagon was powered by an actual horse and you had to drain the cream off the top of the bottle to get to the milk.

S.V. Airlie
06-01-2017, 08:17 AM
A couple of them I don't remember but that is likely because the brands were not available where I lived. I do remember that the dairy delivery wagon was powered by an actual horse and you had to drain the cream off the top of the bottle to get to the milk.No horse, we had an old truck deliver. Mondays and Fridays, 5AM. We just shook the heck out of the bottles to mix in the cream with the milk. I'd say, the cream was more than a third cream to begin with.

Norman Bernstein
06-01-2017, 08:19 AM
A couple of them I don't remember but that is likely because the brands were not available where I lived. I do remember that the dairy delivery wagon was powered by an actual horse and you had to drain the cream off the top of the bottle to get to the milk.

I remember having a milk box on the front steps. In the summer, the delivery guy would leave a chunk of ice over the bottles.... in the winter, he'd stuff the box with crumpled newspaper to try to insulate the bottles and prevent them from freezing.

Breakaway
06-01-2017, 08:21 AM
Yep. All but the newsreels.

I still go to a drive-in movie once a year. There is one in Greenville, NY, near where I take a week off each summer.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Laq_bmWhAgg


Kevin

S.V. Airlie
06-01-2017, 08:29 AM
We had real operators and switch boards, no rotary dial. Picking up the phone was automatically answered by the operator. As a kid, 5-7, I'd pick up the phone and ask the operator to connect me with one of my grandmothers. Always came back with "which one?" I'd answer and they'd come back to saying, "she's not here, it's Thursday, she's playing bridge with _______. Do you want to call her there?"

CWSmith
06-01-2017, 08:34 AM
Apparently, I am not older than dirt, but I am older than some very well-aged compost.

I remember most of them.

S.V. Airlie
06-01-2017, 08:38 AM
Apparently, I am not older than dirt, but I am older than some very well-aged compost.

I remember most of them.As long as you're not used as compost!:(

Shang
06-01-2017, 08:47 AM
https://img0.etsystatic.com/119/3/8423444/il_570xN.911544436_1inr.jpg

Also...about the switchboard telephone connection...I've got you all beat--I WAS the night time switchboard operator while I was in college. Five p.m. until midnight.

Yep, older than dirt.

CWSmith
06-01-2017, 08:53 AM
As long as you're not used as compost!:(

In time, all things in time... :)

ccmanuals
06-01-2017, 08:55 AM
My wife was a switchboard operator for the Pan Canal company.

S.V. Airlie
06-01-2017, 08:57 AM
https://img0.etsystatic.com/119/3/8423444/il_570xN.911544436_1inr.jpg

Also...about the switchboard telephone connection...I've got you all beat--I WAS the night time switchboard operator while I was in college. Five p.m. until midnight.

Yep, older than dirt. We had one at college but, I wasn't an operator. As a faculty member at boarding schools I filled in when I had weekend duty. Not paid, contracts with the school was limited to one sentence. "You are obligated to do what needs to be done regardless of your official duty (teaching).

Keith Wilson
06-01-2017, 08:58 AM
https://scontent.fzty1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/18582639_1578681082193951_4749399765403278365_n.jp g?oh=f882b0e82521c1af89f6289cd60a5f4f&oe=59E17DEA

Lesee:
1. Yes. Horrible stuff.
2. Vaguely
3. Yes
4. Definitely
5. Yes, although they were rare even when I was a kid
6. Sure.
7. No, I'm not that old.
8. No.
9. I wore them.
10. No.
11. I had one.
12. No, I didn't have a TV when I was little.
13. Yes.
14. Yes
15. Used them.
16. I'll never forget the smell.
17. Yes
18. Used one to adjust my skates
19. Never went to one, but I certainly remember them.

Hoo Hah, only 14!

Remember this kind of vending machine, where you slide the bottle down the track to the release gate?

http://www.vintagevending.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/glasco-starlet.jpg

Todd D
06-01-2017, 08:59 AM
I don't remember wax bottles of sugar water or Howdy Doody. I put the lack of memory of Howdy Doody down to us not having a TV in the 50s. I suspect the wax bottles may have been more of an east coast thing.

Gerarddm
06-01-2017, 09:00 AM
Same as Norman.

My childhood phone number was PYramid 6-2367, BTW.

One thing they forgot to mention were postal zones before the introduction of Zip codes.

Keith Wilson
06-01-2017, 09:02 AM
Triangle 7-2674

S.V. Airlie
06-01-2017, 09:02 AM
https://scontent.fzty1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/18582639_1578681082193951_4749399765403278365_n.jp g?oh=f882b0e82521c1af89f6289cd60a5f4f&oe=59E17DEA

Lesee:
1. Yes. Horrible stuff.
2. Vaguely
3. Yes
4. Definitely
5. Yes, although they were rare even when I was a kid
6. Sure.
7. No, I'm not that old.
8. No.
9. I wore them.
10. No.
11. I had one.
12. No, I didn't have a TV when I was little.
13. Yes.
14. Yes
15. Used them.
16. I'll never forget the smell.
17. Yes
18. Used one to adjust my skates
19. Never went to one, but I certainly remember them.

Hoo Hah, only 14!

Remember this kind of vending machine, where you slide the bottle down the track to the release gate?

http://www.vintagevending.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/glasco-starlet.jpgKeith, we had party lines into the 80's here. Could be a rural thing though.

Keith Wilson
06-01-2017, 09:03 AM
Keith, we had party lines into the 80's here. Could be a rural thing though.Really? I heard about them as something that disappeared when my parents were young, but I grew up in suburbs of big cities.

Shang
06-01-2017, 09:19 AM
During cold weather a Black gentleman with a horse-drawn wagon would circulate through the neighborhood, chanting: "Hauling Ash! Hauling Ash!" Most of the homes were heated with coal furnaces, and periodically the coal ashes had to be removed.

S.V. Airlie
06-01-2017, 09:25 AM
Really? I heard about them as something that disappeared when my parents were young, but I grew up in suburbs of big cities.As I posted, it probably is a rural thing!

Keith Wilson
06-01-2017, 09:29 AM
My grandmother's house outside Scranton had a coal-fired furnace, and a coal stove in the kitchen as well. They had added an automatic stoker attachment to the furnace so you didn't have to shovel the coal in by hand, only fill the hopper. There was also a gas stove about 20% of the size of the old one, but she preferred to cook with coal. All of that was seriously archaic by the 1960's though; not only her house, but the whole town was kind of a time warp.

Jimmy W
06-01-2017, 09:32 AM
All except the chewing gum and the wax. EDison 22527, but you only had to dial the numbers. I think our ring was 1 long and 2 short.

Chris Coose
06-01-2017, 09:37 AM
Marblehead #s began with Neptune (NE-1).
There was an old guy who rigged a tricycle with a grinding wheel and went around the old town and sharpened kitchen knives. He had a big bell to announce his arrival in the neighborhood. I've always thought to replicate that if I got into a pinch. Downtown foodie Portland would be a crusher.

Harry Miller
06-01-2017, 09:38 AM
We still have a party line at the cottage. We're long short Wayne, down the lake, is two longs.
I was in charge of our tennis club pro shop one summer. We had a pop (soda) machine like the one in Keith's post. I had to keep an eye on it as some kids would flip the tops off and drink the contents with a straw.

Dan McCosh
06-01-2017, 09:39 AM
Remember the whole list. Might add cooking on a wood stove (my grandmother in Chicago), and a door-to-door knife and scissors sharpener a regular in the neighborhood. Milk delivery, of course, included some grocery supplies. Then there were the street cars, coaster brakes on the bike, the Canasta craze.....Folks up north still cut ice from ponds, delivered to houses...

Keith Wilson
06-01-2017, 10:26 AM
You can still buy bikes with coaster brakes.

Shang
06-01-2017, 10:29 AM
Remember the whole list. Might add cooking on a wood stove (my grandmother in Chicago), and a door-to-door knife and scissors sharpener a regular in the neighborhood. Milk delivery, of course, included some grocery supplies. Then there were the street cars, coaster brakes on the bike, the Canasta craze.....Folks up north still cut ice from ponds, delivered to houses...

Kansas City had streetcars too (Everything's up to date in Kansas City...). Since the trolley tracks were the same gauge as railroad tracks freight was moved through town at night--it was kind of startling to meet a locomotive coming down Broadway at night.

Dan McCosh
06-01-2017, 11:11 AM
Kansas City had streetcars too (Everything's up to date in Kansas City...). Since the trolley tracks were the same gauge as railroad tracks freight was moved through town at night--it was kind of startling to meet a locomotive coming down Broadway at night. Detroit just started up a new streetcar line, for about two miles. They had to rip up the old tracks under the pavement to install the new tracks. The new streetcar still gets stuck in traffic, just like the old ones.

Vince Brennan
06-01-2017, 08:28 PM
Fred Langa:

I was out walking and passed a storefront where two employees were looking concernedly at the sidewalk.

One stooped to pick something up. The other said, "Ugh, don't touch it!"

I got closer and saw it was a freshly dead green-yellow bird; apparently just having flown into the glass.

"Look, it has a leg band!" said the employee holding the limp body.

"It's a parakeet from a pet store," said the other.

I chimed in, "More like an ex-parakeet, by Python standards."

I got two slow, head-swivel takes, followed by two utterly blank stares.

I am a fossil. :)

coelacanth2
06-01-2017, 10:13 PM
Milk delivery 2x per week, bread and Hostess stuff fridays, Fuller brush guy a couple of times a year. Never Ido the party line thing but the GE fridge my folks bought in '55 is still going strong in one of their friend's basements. I remember the wax bottles at the country store, along with the "Test Your Willpower" electroshock machine. 5 cents to get zapped ...

Dirt looks at me and says,"Dang, you're old".

skuthorp
06-01-2017, 11:44 PM
Grandma cooked on a big double oven wood stove. I had to keep up the wood supply, including graded kindling for temperature adjustment when baking. She kept a bowl of cold water on the baking slab and flicked a few drops onto the stove top and door to judge the temperature. In summer meat was cooked at night so as not to attract the flies……..
Her phone code rings were 2 long 2 short 1 long. Melbourne phone MX 5418.
At the back of grandma's house was an old mine tunnel, where butter in a limestone cooler, milk, meat, ginger beer and beer was kept.

Jim Bow
06-01-2017, 11:49 PM
I recall our car registration was in a holder which was strapped to the driver's visor. A couple of our cars had the registration wrapped around the steering column visible through the windshield.

Todd Bradshaw
06-02-2017, 01:07 AM
Empire 7-7609. I was aware of Howdy Doody, but we didn't have a TV back then. Milk was delivered by a horse-drawn wagon, and our milk man later ditched the horse became the vice president of our bank. Back when I was flying a balloon one of the towns in Indiana on our circuit had an X-rated Drive In. After our evening flights, we would usually pack up and drive past it on the way home and see what was cooking. There was a farm house across the road maybe 400 yards away that would have had a straight shot view of the screen. I guess they were movie buffs......

That's me in the hoodie with my Robot Commando and my little brother in the window.

http://i1303.photobucket.com/albums/ag153/ToddBradshaw/assorted/robot-commando_zpspjjix6ao.jpg

David W Pratt
06-02-2017, 04:31 AM
All of them.
I even remember metal ice cube trays without levers, which always broke anyway.