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Jim Bow
05-31-2017, 10:56 PM
Seems that Exxon et al like the idea of remaining in the world.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2017-05-31/exxon-conoco-back-paris-climate-deal-as-trump-weighs-pact-exit

skuthorp
06-01-2017, 02:00 AM
There is talk that if the US pulls out then it will allow the other nations involved to take a harder line, including a carbon tax on US imports. BTW, it seems that India and China are well on the way to meeting, if not exceeding their stated targets.

The US runs a severe risk of loosing credibility and position as a world leader. Having the biggest military is not the only criteria.

PeterSibley
06-01-2017, 02:18 AM
News just in confirms that Donald Trump will make an announcement on the US pulling out of the Paris Climate Agreement at 5am AEST tomorrow.
But, I’m not writing today to pile on the bad news, but to let you know that it might not be as bad as you may think. Trump cannot stop the world-wide wave of climate action.

Five Reasons Why Climate Action can’t be Trumped1. The Paris Agreement is global.

The US, though powerful and a large emitter, is still just one country. China, Germany, France, UK, India and over 147 countries have ratified the Paris Agreement and show no signs of backtracking.
2. Renewables are unstoppable.

Trump may favour fossil fuels, but he can’t beat economics. Solar and wind are now the cheapest form of new power in many countries, like Australia. Renewable power will continue to drop in cost as it continues to be dramatically scaled up. Just ask one of the countries capitalising on it - China. China will invest $360 billion in renewable energy through to 2020, creating 13 million more jobs in the process (1).
3. US States are taking the lead.

US states are already leading on clean energy, including the Republican stronghold of Texas, and one of the world’s largest economies, California.
4. Leadership is also coming from the world’s largest companies.

95 global corporations (many of them based in the US) – including Apple, Coca-Cola, GM, Goldman Sachs, Google, Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft, Unilever, and even Walmart – have committed to 100% renewables in their operations (2).
5. The rest of the world is already responding.

The EU and China have just announced they will strengthen their climate ties. The EU has promised to give China €10m to rollout a national emissions trading system. This comes on top of indications they could levy ‘carbon taxes’ on US imports (3). International markets are also signalling this as a damaging move for the US, with US energy stocks taking a plunge. It is likely the U.S. will be one of the biggest victim of this decision, missing out on countless business opportunities and becoming increasingly uncompetitive.
However, Trump’s action will embolden those trying to hold back action on climate change.
Just this week Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg announced Australia will divert funds for renewable energy to coal, and he has said Australia will not pressure Trump on his decision to withdraw from the Paris agreement.
As the Chief Scientist prepares to hand down his report on the national energy system next week, our role - in holding our leaders to account and injecting facts into the national debate - is crucial.
In 50 years time I suspect the history books will note Trump’s actions as farcical. But this story’s ending will be written by us, the people of the world who dared to stay strong, stand together and light the way to a better future.

skuthorp
06-01-2017, 02:30 AM
I have no confidence in our government on this matter at all. They will prevaricate about the place and use weasel words to try to ride both horses at once.

David W Pratt
06-01-2017, 04:29 AM
How does a carbon tax work?

skuthorp
06-01-2017, 04:34 AM
For Australia, a tax now cancelled, by a RW government. It was a compromise in that it didn't cover as much as it was intended. The Conservative opposition campaigned as political oppositions do, disgracefully, and the tax lost the election. Now industry says a carbon tax is almost an essential. As a commentator said, "Parliament, and government, is in a very shabby state".
WHAT IS IT?
A flat charge of $23 per tonne of emissions will be levied on the top polluters. It is designed to change energy use and encourage investment in clean energy sources such as solar, gas and wind. In 2015, the tax will be replaced with a market-driven system, referred to as an Emissions Trading Scheme.
WHO PAYS THE TAX?
Only the nation's top 500 polluters, half the number originally planned. This is partly due to the government's decision to exclude fuel from the scheme. In total, 0.02 per cent of Australia's 3 million businesses will be taxed. Fuel suppliers and distributors and companies emitting synthetic greenhouse gases, including the refrigeration and air-conditioning industries, are exempt.

http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/carbon-tax-explained-20110709-1h7tg.html

Peerie Maa
06-01-2017, 05:25 AM
From another thread

from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-40106278

Shareholders in Exxon Mobil have backed a motion requiring the company to assess the risks from climate change.
The plan, proposed by investors including the Church of England, was supported by over 62% of those eligible to vote.
The vote comes as US media reports that President Trump is poised to pull out of the Paris climate agreement.
Exxon will now have to consider how global efforts to mitigate climate change will impact their business.
It is to be hoped that they will also migrate their business away from fuel and towards petrochemical feed stocks, so reducing their contribution to AGW.

Peerie Maa
06-01-2017, 05:26 AM
News just in confirms that Donald Trump will make an announcement on the US pulling out of the Paris Climate Agreement at 5am AEST tomorrow.
But, I’m not writing today to pile on the bad news, but to let you know that it might not be as bad as you may think. Trump cannot stop the world-wide wave of climate action.

Five Reasons Why Climate Action can’t be Trumped
1. The Paris Agreement is global.

The US, though powerful and a large emitter, is still just one country. China, Germany, France, UK, India and over 147 countries have ratified the Paris Agreement and show no signs of backtracking.
2. Renewables are unstoppable.

Trump may favour fossil fuels, but he can’t beat economics. Solar and wind are now the cheapest form of new power in many countries, like Australia. Renewable power will continue to drop in cost as it continues to be dramatically scaled up. Just ask one of the countries capitalising on it - China. China will invest $360 billion in renewable energy through to 2020, creating 13 million more jobs in the process (1).
3. US States are taking the lead.

US states are already leading on clean energy, including the Republican stronghold of Texas, and one of the world’s largest economies, California.
4. Leadership is also coming from the world’s largest companies.

95 global corporations (many of them based in the US) – including Apple, Coca-Cola, GM, Goldman Sachs, Google, Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft, Unilever, and even Walmart – have committed to 100% renewables in their operations (2).
5. The rest of the world is already responding.

The EU and China have just announced they will strengthen their climate ties. The EU has promised to give China €10m to rollout a national emissions trading system. This comes on top of indications they could levy ‘carbon taxes’ on US imports (3). International markets are also signalling this as a damaging move for the US, with US energy stocks taking a plunge. It is likely the U.S. will be one of the biggest victim of this decision, missing out on countless business opportunities and becoming increasingly uncompetitive.
However, Trump’s action will embolden those trying to hold back action on climate change.
Just this week Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg announced Australia will divert funds for renewable energy to coal, and he has said Australia will not pressure Trump on his decision to withdraw from the Paris agreement.
As the Chief Scientist prepares to hand down his report on the national energy system next week, our role - in holding our leaders to account and injecting facts into the national debate - is crucial.
In 50 years time I suspect the history books will note Trump’s actions as farcical. But this story’s ending will be written by us, the people of the world who dared to stay strong, stand together and light the way to a better future.









and then there is this :D

A slap in the face - Analysis by BBC News environment correspondent Matt McGrathIf he does decide to pull out of the accord, the key question is how will he do it?
The agreement stipulates a three-year waiting period before a country can give notice of leaving, which adds another 12 months and brings us to June 2021.
It could be that President Trump will be out of office before the US would be out of the deal.
Alternatively he could declare that the agreement is a treaty which in US law needs approval by the Senate. It's likely that the Republican majority in the chamber would mean the end of the road for Paris.
A more extreme option would be to pull out of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change upon which the Paris deal is built.
It dates back to 1992 and was agreed by President George Bush, and left in place by his son, George W, who was no great fan of climate action.
Leaving this longstanding convention would only take 12 months, but would be seen as perhaps a bigger slap in the face for the international community, as it places strong emphasis on the environmental rights of developing nations.
Follow @MattMcGrathBBC (https://twitter.com/MattMcGrathBBC)

Osborne Russell
06-01-2017, 11:20 AM
Seems like even some fairly goofy standards that you could count on worldwide would make for more profits. Otherwise, nations extort you serially.