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Jefe
05-30-2017, 09:35 PM
I would appreciate any assistance (including any recommendations for a better forum).

This is an antique rocking chair from the Michigan Chair and Table Company. It was given second hand to my family and has been in the family for probably around 40 years or so. It may be 100 years old.

One of the leg joints came apart. It looks like there was some type of key that doesn't appear to go all the way through.

I have considered just gluing (titebond) and clamping, or even epoxy, but I am wondering how best to repair this with consideration given to not adversely affecting any value it may have as an antique.
http://i715.photobucket.com/albums/ww155/denniss11422/20170527_102008.jpg

http://i715.photobucket.com/albums/ww155/denniss11422/20170527_102023.jpg
http://i715.photobucket.com/albums/ww155/denniss11422/20170527_102032.jpg
http://i715.photobucket.com/albums/ww155/denniss11422/20170527_102042.jpg

http://i715.photobucket.com/albums/ww155/denniss11422/20170527_101937.jpg

Vince Brennan
05-30-2017, 10:07 PM
Very nice. NOT bilge material.

Let me suggest you move this to the building and repair forum or the misc. boat related forum.

Jim Mahan
05-30-2017, 10:33 PM
Gotta disagree twice, here.

Vince, it's an antique rocker, not a boat. Perfect for the bilge.

Jefe, there is no better forum.
:d

Vince Brennan
05-30-2017, 10:41 PM
I will state that this is a repair to A NON-BOAT item. YMMV on this Jim, but mine does not.

This is an actual, constructive thing, a repair to wood. The Bilge deals primarily in constructions of psychologically indefensible and immaterial conceptions.

I just feel that an actual material repair to an actual object construct of fibrous plant growth belongs in a forum which, dealing with materially perceptible and physically (actually) present items of wood, would be better served in a forum NOT dealing with the ephemeral and largely evanescent concepts best dealt with in this psychotic milleu.

Again, YMMV.

Mine don't.

amish rob
05-30-2017, 10:46 PM
Jefe,

Go post the pictures on the Something Cool thread, then ask your questions there. Any cool stuff is welcome on that thread.

Imperial Loophole. ;)

Peace,
Emperor For Life (Self Proclaimed)

skuthorp
05-30-2017, 10:56 PM
Certainly looks like a key, in the manner of blind dowells, half of which seems to be in place in the matching piece after breaking. Was the other piece, where the hole is, still in place?
I am working with small sailing dinghy wooden spars built in the early 1960's where the glue joints have failed completely, I wonder if this might have happened in this case putting undue pressure on the key which broke?

Jimmy W
05-30-2017, 11:12 PM
I think that it should be perfectly acceptable here which used to be called the non boat misc. section. I think that you likely have a long enough scarf to use any good glue like either Titebond or thickened epoxy to glue it back together. The dowel was probably there to hold the rocker onto the leg.

Spin_Drift
05-31-2017, 02:05 AM
Following:)

Wet Feet
05-31-2017, 04:34 AM
I would epoxy glue the fracture , then use a dowel jig to drill new dowel sockets nice and square .
Assembly is a little fiddly but not impossible.

Peerie Maa
05-31-2017, 04:45 AM
It may be a much loved antique, but the Michigan Chair and Table Company cut costs by skimping on materials.

Scrape the old glue off of the joint surfaces, and use any good modern glue to refix it. Do a dry run with clamps and cauls, including pulling the rocker and seat together before opening the glue pot.

WX
05-31-2017, 04:49 AM
Talking of rocking chairs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZARqMu3t1dc

skuthorp
05-31-2017, 05:01 AM
That is a beautiful thing Gary.

WX
05-31-2017, 05:14 AM
That is a beautiful thing Gary.

First came across it back in the 80s and it took me many years to find it again. Not knowing the name didn't help. It's a beautiful little story and good music as well.

phiil
05-31-2017, 06:17 AM
I believe that real antique restorers absolutely ¨hate¨coming across Any piece that's been repaired with epoxy. They still swear by hide glue.
Some relatives just sold a table that's been in our family since the 1700's for over seven figures. It's value was so high mainly because it had never been refinished, let alone epoxied.

TomF
05-31-2017, 06:28 AM
I was gonna say, actual antiques guys would say exactly that - scrape off any existing glue and use hide glue for the fix. Musical instrument makers especially like hide glue because it is a reversible repair.

The key that you show - is it broken off in the original pieces? Can it be chiseled out, and a similar key made to fit the existing mortises?

skuthorp
05-31-2017, 06:58 AM
I believe that real antique restorers absolutely ¨hate¨coming across Any piece that's been repaired with epoxy. They still swear by hide glue.
Some relatives just sold a table that's been in our family since the 1700's for over seven figures. It's value was so high mainly because it had never been refinished, let alone epoxied.
I agree with that actually, I was a restoration and repair bookbinder, still do some, and you never do anything that isn't reversible.

Harry Miller
05-31-2017, 07:29 AM
If it's as old as you say the original glue might be hide glue. If it is heat (hot water or heat gun) will liquefy it. It can then be reglued with hide glue. I use "old brown glue" but titebond sells it. Hide glue will stick to itself while modern glues won't. That's why Nick said to scrape all the glue off both sides. A dowel jig would be easier than cutting a new floating tenon (key). Good luck.

Paul Pless
05-31-2017, 08:38 AM
Talking of rocking chairs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZARqMu3t1dc

thanks for this post
i remember seeing this when i was a child and had forgotten it

Paul Pless
05-31-2017, 08:49 AM
including any recommendations for a better forumwait?! there exist other forums???