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leikec
05-24-2017, 10:54 PM
Some people are, but I tend to be pretty timid. My move from Missouri to Michigan was very bold by my standards--some people think nothing of moving cross country at the drop of a hat.

Financially I am very conservative. I would never risk all of my assets to start a business such as a restaurant, but many people do it without a second thought.

I'm sure my timidity has held me back in life...my cousin always kids me by telling me that I'm allergic to making money. There's truth to it. I don't like to gamble because it drives me crazy to lose money. But I'm not a tightwad--if anything I tend to be overly generous in doing things like picking up the tab at a restaurant, or loaning people money.

Jeff C

skuthorp
05-24-2017, 10:56 PM
I think I've just been good at weighing up the risks, and recognising a scam when I see one. Even the legal ones.

Chip-skiff
05-24-2017, 11:25 PM
Never thought of myself that way. I just wanted to do what I liked: working outdoors, often alone, and seeing wild country. I worked for the US Forest Service for 15 years, mostly alone in remote country. For sport I climbed rock and ice, did ski mountaineering, ran whitewater in a small boat, and that sort of thing. Not because it was risky, but because it was fun. I really enjoy being tested in some way that's impartial and objective, like climbing a frozen waterfall, and coming out on top, alive. No committees, no meetings, no presentations.

Writing is a risky profession, and while I enjoyed some success, I never got much recognition, let alone riches. But as long as I could get by, and not be in debt, I was happy. Did that for another 15 years.

Then I married someone who actually owned a house and had a retirement account, and health insurance, and that sort of thing. After we got married, I talked her into going to New Zealand on a freighter, and we lived there for a year, which sealed our love.

I really didn't care about money. It turned out that she was good at saving but not so good at investing, so I started trying to understand interest and stocks and bonds, and took over the finance stuff. Now that's become another sort of fun. Risking your money is not on the same level as risking your life, but it has its charms, and rewards. And we've done better than I ever imagined.

I never took stupid risks, blind risks, crazy risks. Well, maybe sometimes. But either I've had a long run of extraordinary luck, or maybe the old Gods love those who can't resist a bit of danger.

leikec
05-24-2017, 11:42 PM
I've done the writing thing too, and I had moderate success. I've also worked for myself as a piano teacher for the last eight years. I didn't consider that to be a big risk, as I understood the income potential (and limitations) of that business. I knew if teaching didn't produce the income I needed I could find a job to make enough money to get by.

I'm no climber, but I've spent a lot of time in remote country, and I never felt uncomfortable doing that as I feel that I have a good understanding of how to minimize the risks. I'd much rather spend three weeks in Montana over spending three hours in a plane.

Jeff C

Chip-skiff
05-24-2017, 11:46 PM
I hope you didn't spend too much time worrying about how to minimize the risks.

You should let go occasionally.

BrianW
05-24-2017, 11:53 PM
No. Never get off the boat, that's my motto. LOL!

leikec
05-24-2017, 11:53 PM
One thing that I've definitely noticed--I'm much more of a fraidy-cat now in attempting physical things, when compared to my younger years. On the other hand, I have a different, more fatalistic view of life after losing Karen. I don't have bad days anymore, as it feels wrong to feel sorry for myself when I'm here and she's gone. My problems have certainly been put into perspective.

Jeff C

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
05-25-2017, 02:20 AM
I got married and had kids, so yeah, I'm a risk taker.

wizbang 13
05-25-2017, 02:30 AM
I strapped the roller skates on again last night . Drunk, in Antigua, in a second story bar(underdog).

skuthorp
05-25-2017, 05:17 AM
Actually when I read the OP I never thought of my climbing, skiing, surfing, sailing etc as risks.

skuthorp
05-25-2017, 05:18 AM
I strapped the roller skates on again last night . Drunk, in Antigua, in a second story bar(underdog).
Roller skates in a second story bar? Someone must have taken pics………….:ycool:

Rapelapente
05-25-2017, 09:54 AM
For sure I'm !
Last WE I tried this stuff...

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQDy0YmpdTmp7j2I_fv7oSoa4WllE_Kl d1BoNyZnop6FOwtMsGxcg

And instanly fell on my back with pretty serious injuries to my hands and elbows ...:d

My nephews are still laughing at me.

Norman Bernstein
05-25-2017, 10:16 AM
Some people are, but I tend to be pretty timid. My move from Missouri to Michigan was very bold by my standards--some people think nothing of moving cross country at the drop of a hat.

Financially I am very conservative. I would never risk all of my assets to start a business such as a restaurant, but many people do it without a second thought.

I'm sure my timidity has held me back in life...my cousin always kids me by telling me that I'm allergic to making money. There's truth to it. I don't like to gamble because it drives me crazy to lose money. But I'm not a tightwad--if anything I tend to be overly generous in doing things like picking up the tab at a restaurant, or loaning people money.

Jeff C

I'm generally NOT a risk-taker. As an independent contractor/consultant for the last 25 years of a 43 year career, I've always had the 'risk' of being unable to find a new contract, once the current one was concluded.... and a few times during that period, I was unemployed... which I have always viewed as a terrible thing... but I guess I had enough faith in my skills and abilities, that another contract would come along.

I DID take two significant risks during my career. The first was in 1992, when I left my employer of 18 years (where I guess I was considered to be a 'highly valued' employee, considering the number of stock options they granted me), to leave that job and start Marisystems, to manufacture and market my handheld tide and current prediction computer. It was a modest success for about two years, but was unsustainable beyond that, and my old employer hired me back as a contractor for the next four years. The second big risk was in 2009, when, with two partners, we started Datafetch LLC, to manufacture and market a Bluetooth driver's license scanner for the law enforcement market. I did that for nearly two years, with NO salary... and it eventually failed.

Fortunately, the 'non-risk taker' aspect sustained me in the lean periods... I have always invested, since there would be no pension in my old age. I think I balanced the risks against the possibilities, always aware of potential failure, and never committed myself so deeply that my family would be affected, in any way. It seems to have served me reasonably well. It is true that if I had stayed with my old employer for the entirety of my career, I probably would have been far wealthier by now.... but people do what they must, what feels right and comfortable to them... and I don't regret anything.

Joe (SoCal)
05-25-2017, 10:30 AM
Ummmmmm ....... yea :D

I actually think about this a lot. My best friend and I are completely different in the risk department. We have known each other for over 40 years. We met at the bus stop when we were 7 years old.

He was by nature not a risk taker, he played by all the rules. I was the exact opposite. He would show up at the bus stop with a perfectly prepared macrobiotic diet in specific compartmentalized tupperware, I would show up with a bag of chocolate chips and a 2 liter bottle of coke for breakfast.

As our life progressed he went to college, on scholarship, graduating with honors, then landed a well paying job. I went to a series of universities dropping out at one point to live with a very pretty crazy girl. Then a series of jobs, fortunes made, lost, married, kid, houses, divorce, jobs, grand visions, married again, moved across country, I've started a new life and had to reinvent myself so many times I've lost track.

Heres the odd thing, my friend, lived a modest life always saved, always did the right thing, always was the good guy while I was the rogue. He's been divorced twice, been in financial ruin a number of times. Has been on the same roller coaster called life.

In the end I look at it he doesn't do well with chaos and it deeply troubling to him. Me I kinda thrive on it, when I look back on my examined life worth living, yeah sure I've had my series of debilitating disasters, but I also had way more fun and amazing experiences.

goodbasil
05-25-2017, 10:35 AM
I bought a lottery ticket.

Norman Bernstein
05-25-2017, 10:36 AM
Heres the odd thing, my friend, lived a modest life always saved, always did the right thing, always was the good guy while I was the rogue. He's been divorced twice, been in financial ruin a number of times. Has been on the same roller coaster called life.

It might be wrong to say that 'he always did the right thing', since his outcome wasn't exactly optimal. I know plenty of people who also 'always saved, always did the right thing', and have had happy and successful lives. Maybe not 'exciting' lives... but not all of us spent our years looking for 'excitement'.


In the end I look at it he doesn't do well with chaos and it deeply troubling to him. Me I kinda thrive on it, when I look back on my examined life worth living, yeah sure I've had my series of debilitating disasters, but I also had way more fun and amazing experiences.

From what I know about your life, yes, you've had lots of fun and amazing experiences... but as you say, you've also paid a price for it, at times. Works for you, but doesn't work for everyone.

Joe (SoCal)
05-25-2017, 10:47 AM
Norman as usual you are correct.;) What I think the difference with my friend and myself is he did not see the titanic size icebergs in his life. He assumed if he played by the rules and did the right things then he would be OK. He made choices based on a little bit of naivete. So when disaster struck he wasn't prepared. Then there were forces no one could predict. His son getting cancer at a young age and working through surviving that. His son is in his second year at Exeter on a full ride. The market crash of 2008, where he lost a sizeable fortune. Relationships, he's always been one to fall wholly completely and ignoring some prominent red flags. I at least see the red flags and go for it anyway fully aware of the risk and jump anyway :D

Norman Bernstein
05-25-2017, 10:50 AM
I at least see the red flags and go for it anyway fully aware of the risk and jump anyway :D

It would be exceptionally hard to NOT be impressed at the success you've had over the last year or two, so I'm hoping that you don't encounter any more 'red flags'.

My only question: when you're filthy rich, are you going to forget us 'little people'? :)

isla
05-25-2017, 10:51 AM
It's a very subjective thing. One man's (or woman's) weekend leisure activity is another man's 'Oh no, you'll never get me up in one of those things'.
I used to hitch-hike a lot when I was a teenager. I would just come home from work on Friday evening, grab my sleeping bag and hit the road. No particular destination in mind.
I've always liked and ridden motorcycles. Had a few accidents, but carried on riding until illness forced me to stop a few years ago.
I'm a fairly timid sailor, but that's just me and my wife pottering about, day sailing and coastal cruising. But I'm not afraid of heights, so if I have to climb up the mast I'm happy to do it.

John of Phoenix
05-25-2017, 10:59 AM
My daughter once said, "Hemingway couldn't have written your story."

Joe (SoCal)
05-25-2017, 11:02 AM
When I read biographies of people like Sterling Hayden I think my life is pretty unexamined and tame.

amish rob
05-25-2017, 11:16 AM
My favorite risk taker may be Lopez Lomong. He's a former Lost Boy who literally ran away from the "army" camp he was kidnapped to. He landed here, eventually, and became an Olympic flag bearer.

Me? Yes. The biggest risk I've taken was telling all the doctors to go soak their heads, and getting up and walking. Well. I started walking with the idea to begin running again. After nearly two years of agony and immobility.
Yeah! A crippled guy, on a cane, with a withered leg just got up to start running again.
Then he beat his long time rival in a grueling mountain bike race.
Then become a multi time Ironman.

As to money? I hate it. If I ever make a billion dollars, you can all have some. Shoot, if I ever make a couple thou...
What the heck am I going to do with money?
Yeah, yeah. We NEED it.

Peace,
Robert

Keith Wilson
05-25-2017, 11:39 AM
Nah, not really. I'm not that fond of adrenalin.

Arizona Bay
05-25-2017, 11:45 AM
Yeah, I suppose that I am, never thought about it much, I just do what I do. I never particularly wanted to climb a cliff or a frozen waterfall because it didn't look like fun :D

Canoeyawl
05-25-2017, 01:23 PM
Indeed we are all here, in the bilge...
A split second away from being banded.

bamamick
05-25-2017, 01:43 PM
I have been married to the same wonderful woman for >35 years. I have worked in the same job for 34 years (well, several different jobs in the same place). I have never lived anywhere but Mobile or Baldwin counties. My retirement savings have all been in bonds for as long as I can remember (after I got a statement once telling me how many thousands of dollars I had lost the previous period). So I don't guess you could really call me a risk taker.

On the other hand, at work I am considered one of the last of the great cowboys, and I certainly have taken some risks on the water, both in my ownership of more than 30 different boats and all the racing I have done. I certainly didn't try to keep my kids at home, and they live in places as far away as Boston and Denver (that one just moved from Los Angeles). I don't know. I don't think of myself one way or the other.

Mickey Lake

TomF
05-25-2017, 02:00 PM
If I took more risks I'd have a hard time remembering where I'd stashed them all.

leikec
05-25-2017, 02:06 PM
I have been married to the same wonderful woman for >35 years. I have worked in the same job for 34 years (well, several different jobs in the same place). I have never lived anywhere but Mobile or Baldwin counties. My retirement savings have all been in bonds for as long as I can remember (after I got a statement once telling me how many thousands of dollars I had lost the previous period). So I don't guess you could really call me a risk taker.

On the other hand, at work I am considered one of the last of the great cowboys, and I certainly have taken some risks on the water, both in my ownership of more than 30 different boats and all the racing I have done. I certainly didn't try to keep my kids at home, and they live in places as far away as Boston and Denver (that one just moved from Los Angeles). I don't know. I don't think of myself one way or the other.

Mickey Lake

It's perfectly ok to be a prudent, cautious person and still be an interesting individual. :D

Jeff C

Chip-skiff
05-25-2017, 02:25 PM
Nah, not really. I'm not that fond of adrenalin.

One thing I've noticed is that when I'm dealing with serious hazards and making split-second decisions, such as rowing a big-water run through boulders, or skiing the steeps, everything seems to slow down. Same deal on ice climbs (which I haven't done for years as I got too beat-up physically). That slo-mo feeling is enjoyable, like a trance state.

amish rob
05-25-2017, 02:30 PM
One thing I've noticed is that when I'm dealing with serious hazards and making split-second decisions, such as rowing a big-water run through boulders, or skiing the steeps, everything seems to slow down. Same deal on ice climbs (which I haven't done for years as I got too beat-up physically). That slo-mo feeling is enjoyable, like a trance state.
THAT is the drug. The brief periods of being hyper alert and aware.

Racing downhills, I would often trance out, to an extent, and be able to actually see the line to follow. Brief moments would seem to last hours.
Same same with ultra endurance. After about 12 hours, the pretense of self disappears and life becomes more intimate and moment by moment. Time seems to slow, and focus becomes laser sharp, and tunnel shaped. :)

Peace,
Robert

Boater14
05-25-2017, 03:31 PM
People with backing, a trump or Kennedy or the bankers kid really can't get poor no matter how hard they try. You can write off stupid stock picks right? People like me and maybe one or two of you who Came from very little know that a wrong move or two could make a huge difference in our lives. No one to make that critical phone call or job offer. I always look at the family background of a risk taker.

bamamick
05-25-2017, 03:49 PM
THAT is the drug. The brief periods of being hyper alert and aware.

Racing downhills, I would often trance out, to an extent, and be able to actually see the line to follow. Brief moments would seem to last hours.
Same same with ultra endurance. After about 12 hours, the pretense of self disappears and life becomes more intimate and moment by moment. Time seems to slow, and focus becomes laser sharp, and tunnel shaped. :)

Peace,
Robert

You raced downhill skiing? That is really cool.

Mickey Lake

Too Little Time
05-25-2017, 08:08 PM
Some people are, but I tend to be pretty timid. My move from Missouri to Michigan was very bold by my standards--some people think nothing of moving cross country at the drop of a hat.

Financially I am very conservative. I would never risk all of my assets to start a business such as a restaurant, but many people do it without a second thought.

I'm sure my timidity has held me back in life...my cousin always kids me by telling me that I'm allergic to making money. There's truth to it. I don't like to gamble because it drives me crazy to lose money. But I'm not a tightwad--if anything I tend to be overly generous in doing things like picking up the tab at a restaurant, or loaning people money.

Jeff C
Both ignorance and knowledge change one's evaluation of risk. I have been both too dumb to see risk and smart enough to embrace risk. Overall I have not been seriously harmed by the risks I have taken or not seen.

I have moved several times without prospects at my destination. The moves seemed the least risky of choices available. Of course, there were times that not moving was the least risky choice.

Financial risk is not having the cash flow meet spending needs. My wife has always kept our spending under control relative to our cash flow.

amish rob
05-25-2017, 08:11 PM
You raced downhill skiing? That is really cool.

Mickey Lake

Oh, nothing that cool. Mountain bikes. But I did race in lots of ski resorts!

True confession. I've never been to Mammoth or Big Bear in the winter...

Peace,
Robert

Dan McCosh
05-26-2017, 11:33 AM
I think you have to sort out what kind of risks you are taking. I've attempted a number of risk sports--which can include sailing. Some have relatively high casualty rates--such a mountain climbing, or auto racing. Some, like skiing, can be risky or not, depending on how far you want to press your luck. I tend to be quite willing to jump into something once--like hang-gliding. I have issues with auto racing, as it involves pressing your luck lap after lap. You end up playing a game of chicken with the other cars, which is betting against the house. As for finances, I worked for a paycheck most of my life, despite being born in a family that not only owned a business, but had few friends or acquaintances that worked for a paycheck. This seems to be both a frame of mind and a lifestyle. I confess that my mindset is not particularly suited to an irregular income--hence risk-adverse. My parents owned nine different houses before I left high school, and I still find it difficult to feel settled in a place. Dunno if a willingness to relocate is risky behavior. We have lived in two houses since married, 52 years ago. Probably getting married a bit young was the biggest risk of all, but it never seemed like it.

Shang
05-26-2017, 01:36 PM
A risk-taker? I dunno, I don't exactly think of myself that way.
I've always held at least two jobs, some of which were marginally dangerous. Worked as a TV news stringer with a movie camera, filmed car crashes, fires and tornadoes. Slipped off of the back deck of a Corvette while filming a road race, and landed in the hay bales. Skipped seven hundred lunches to pay for flying lessons. Flew sail planes at Harris Hill. Competed for graduate school scholarships, and won. Taught art and filmmaking at several colleges. Operated an animated film studio. My writings were published, as were my illustrations and cartoon strips. Bought the ruin of a hundred year old brick farmhouse and turned it into a livable, wood-heated home in Labrador Valley where the snow fall averaged nine or ten feet. Moved back to the mid-west to teach art at another college, and restored another hundred-year home. Designed church windows for a stained glass studio.

Did I mention caving, white-water canoeing, camping, hiking, raising a kid, and a bunch of other stuff?

Oh well, another time...