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Rich Jones
05-20-2017, 04:39 PM
but Vermont is more "emerald" then you.
I went to a day long conference today which required me to drive through the heart of the Green Mountains. The roads follow the river valleys and wind their way through the mountains. Blue, sunny sky and the greenery is absolutely stunning right now with all the new leaves coming out. Everything is green, green, green! Every shade of green you can think of.
I was in Ireland last summer and, while beautiful and somewhat green, I couldn't understand why it's called the "Emerald Isle". Green? Yeah, kind of, but nothing like my little state of Vermont.

Gerarddm
05-20-2017, 04:41 PM
Never been to Ireland, but hell yes, there is reason why it is the Green Mountain State.

Been in some lush areas of Kentucky, but Vermont still tops it in my book. My father was from Barre.

Kevin T
05-20-2017, 04:43 PM
I believe it is referred to as the Emerald Isle, because it is green year round in most of the country.

Vermont on the other hand has the dreadful brown season, known as the mud season, or time of not so great sledding.:d

Peerie Maa
05-20-2017, 04:52 PM
It has been the Emerald Isle (www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/how-did-ireland-come-to-be-called-the-emerald-isle)since 1795.

Did anyone of any account live in Vermont in 1795?

Chip-skiff
05-20-2017, 04:57 PM
but Vermont is more "emerald" then you.

Well, Jesus, Mary, and Joseph! Vermont wasn't cut and timbered for millennia. Much of the portion of Ireland where I've spent time is bog, which tends to look like this:

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/e0113e1e-9456-42a8-85d4-251b2cae1cc7.jpg

This is the Céide Fields, a neolithic farming site in Mayo, where the early settlers cut the forest to grow crops and pasture cattle, and to get material for houses and palisades.

http://www.irishcentral.com/images/MI-main-Ceide-fields-mayo-failte-ireland.jpg

There's an excellent exhibit that shows how the loss of forest cover increased soil moisture to the point where the subsoil was permanently saturated, creating anaerobic conditions. The organic matter couldn't oxidise (rot) and the undecomposed layers built up until they overwhelmed the stone walls and village with a soggy acidic bog. Much of what is now bog was once forest.

So instead of burning wood for heat, the paddies harvest the bog: turf.

https://breisebreiseleighgoleire1969.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/turf-cutter1.jpg

Keith Wilson
05-20-2017, 05:06 PM
. . .the loss of forest cover increased soil moisture . . . Now THAT'S a wet climate. Most places it works the other way round and you end up with scrubby grass and too little water.

Chris Smith porter maine
05-20-2017, 05:10 PM
It has been the Emerald Isle (www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/how-did-ireland-come-to-be-called-the-emerald-isle)since 1795.

Did anyone of any account live in Vermont in 1795?

Ethan Allen comes to mind.

Peerie Maa
05-20-2017, 05:19 PM
Ethan Allen comes to mind.

A lot of similarities to William Drennan, but without the memorable turn of phrase. ;)

Chip-skiff
05-20-2017, 05:28 PM
Now THAT'S a wet climate. Most places it works the other way round and you end up with scrubby grass and too little water.

A wet climate indeed. According to Met Eireann: Rainfall in the west generally averages between 1000 and 1250 mm (39-49 inches). In many mountainous districts rainfall exceeds 2000mm (78 in.) per year.

Where there's forest cover, much of the snow and rain evaporates before reaching the soil. The dense trees and deep-rooted perennials take still more moisture from the soil through evapotranspiration. Where there are slopes, groundwater drains off into streams.

Much of the carpet bog in Ireland is level, or nearly so, or has an impermeable layer near the surface. The tipping point, ecologically, is the development of permanent anaerobic conditions in the groundwater, causing organic matter to accumulate without decomposing. Soils on floodplains and near bodies of water can be anaerobic for the wet part of the year, and dry out and oxidise the rest of the time. If you dig a pit, you can see streaks of reduced minerals (e.g. yellow sulfur) which is called gleying.

(Forgive the blathering, but this my field.)

Chris Smith porter maine
05-20-2017, 05:31 PM
A lot of similarities to William Drennan, but without the memorable turn of phrase. ;)

Thanks Nick had never heard of him.

Canoeyawl
05-20-2017, 05:37 PM
When it looks like this in Ireland, we can compare notes...

http://77df5bb187f15d48d36c-e58b5711b7a4113c9c2729dbfded80a5.r9.cf1.rackcdn.co m/lps/assets/u/Snow-Shoeing.jpg

S.V. Airlie
05-20-2017, 05:39 PM
It has been the Emerald Isle (http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/how-did-ireland-come-to-be-called-the-emerald-isle)since 1795.

Did anyone of any account live in Vermont in 1795?The Green Mountain Boys, Revolutionary War.

Rich Jones
05-20-2017, 06:16 PM
It has been the Emerald Isle (http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/how-did-ireland-come-to-be-called-the-emerald-isle)since 1795.

Did anyone of any account live in Vermont in 1795? The town I live in was founded in 1792, so at less a few people and a handful of cows and sheep were here. It was really green back then, until the settlers pretty much clear cut the entire state to a point where only 25% of the forest remained. Nowadays, it's back to 75% forest, which explains the stone walls running though my woods. Used to be all sheep pasture.

Jim Bow
05-20-2017, 06:34 PM
I got three words for all you guys: Hoh Rain Forest.
http://exotichikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/IMG_1523-Large.jpg

Rich Jones
05-20-2017, 07:08 PM
When it looks like this in Ireland, we can compare notes...

http://77df5bb187f15d48d36c-e58b5711b7a4113c9c2729dbfded80a5.r9.cf1.rackcdn.co m/lps/assets/u/Snow-Shoeing.jpg In my original post, I mentioned that there were all shades of green in Vermont. If you look closely enough, you'll notice that the snow is a very, very, very light shade of green.:D

Rich Jones
05-20-2017, 07:12 PM
I got three words for all you guys: Hoh Rain Forest.
http://exotichikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/IMG_1523-Large.jpg What is that on the trees? Mold?:d

I truly enjoyed touring Ireland. The people were great and the history and sights were wonderful. My wife fell in love with the country and would go back in a heart beat. Next trip across the pond will probably be England and Scotland.

Chip-skiff
05-20-2017, 08:01 PM
While I love Ireland, I don't necessarily prefer it to the state of my birth.

Except for the whiskey and the oysters.

And the politics.

(Guinness as well.)

Wet Feet
05-20-2017, 09:18 PM
https://storage.googleapis.com/idx-acnt-gs.ihouseprd.com/AR446309/file_manager/hiking%20vt.jpg


https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/8a/1c/1d/8a1c1d2b027aee9d8c53ec66db08d257.jpg

http://media.istockphoto.com/photos/spring-in-vermont-picture-id186873463?k=6&m=186873463&s=612x612&w=0&h=R8I8RmaAm3tn583pLuii8VEdTIdF3H_gBbHEwLcij_M=

I must say , you do live in an amazing place.