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Steve McMahon
05-09-2017, 12:34 PM
Cripes, I hope this isn't as serious as it sounds. I am glad I don't live anywhere near one of these things anymore.

Hundreds of workers were in "take cover" position after a tunnel in a plutonium finishing plant collapsed in Hanford, Washington early Tuesday morning.
The tunnel was full of contaminated materials such as hot radioactive trains that transport fuel rods.
A source said crews doing road work nearby may have created enough vibration to cause the collapse.
A manager sent a message to all personnel telling them to "secure ventilation in your building" and "refrain from eating or drinking."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/emergency-declared-at-hanford-nuclear-site-in-washington-state-1.4106507

Paul Pless
05-09-2017, 12:41 PM
note to self: avoid tours of radioactive waste holding sites


Hanford Site

Expansive (586-sq.-mile) former nuclear production site that is now open for tours.

Bob Adams
05-09-2017, 01:00 PM
note to self: avoid tours of radioactive waste holding sites

No waste per se. I'll be leading tours for the general public May21.

https://fi9hi8t504-flywheel.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/Savannah-Waterside.jpg

Steve McMahon
05-09-2017, 01:01 PM
note to self: avoid tours of radioactive waste holding sites

Sounds to me to be a pretty good idea to avoid the whole state!
For decades Hanford made plutonium for nuclear weapons, including for the bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan.

It is now the largest repository of radioactive waste in the United States.
Hanford has about 211 million litres of waste stored in underground tanks. Some tanks date back to World War II and are leaking.
The sprawling Hanford site is about half the size of Rhode Island.

Paul Pless
05-09-2017, 01:04 PM
The Savannah is a very pretty ship.
No waste per se. I'll be leading tours for the general public May21.

https://fi9hi8t504-flywheel.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/Savannah-Waterside.jpg

Bob Adams
05-09-2017, 01:06 PM
She is Paul. .I never dreamed I'd have the access to her I have now. They sure don't build them like this anymore.

John of Phoenix
05-09-2017, 01:39 PM
The Savannah is a very pretty ship.Pretty is only skin deep.

Radioactive Waste

The Savannah was designed to contain more than 10,000 gallons of liquid radioactive waste (at least 100 days accumulation). However, actual waste output initially exceeded storage capacity. During her first year in operation, she released more than 115,000 gallons of radioactive waste at sea. Modifications were made later to bring the amount of waste resulting from valve leaks in line with the ship's onboard storage capacity. When operating properly, radioactive wastes were stored in the ship until disposal could be arranged at a licensed facility, or it could be discharged to its special servicing barge, the N.S.V. (Nuclear Servicing Vessel) Atomic Servant.

Bob Adams
05-09-2017, 07:05 PM
Pretty is only skin deep.

Radioactive Waste

The Savannah was designed to contain more than 10,000 gallons of liquid radioactive waste (at least 100 days accumulation). However, actual waste output initially exceeded storage capacity. During her first year in operation, she released more than 115,000 gallons of radioactive waste at sea. Modifications were made later to bring the amount of waste resulting from valve leaks in line with the ship's onboard storage capacity. When operating properly, radioactive wastes were stored in the ship until disposal could be arranged at a licensed facility, or it could be discharged to its special servicing barge, the N.S.V. (Nuclear Servicing Vessel) Atomic Servant.





As first constructed, the primary plant (nuclear steam supply system) on board N.S. SAVANNAH (hereafter, "NSS") was found to have a leak rate which at times depending upon operations and testing could amount to up to 1200 US gallons per day, although often it was much lower. It's important to understand that this was reactor coolant - which itself is highly purified water.
The process was that accumulated leaked coolant was stored in tanks. Prior to discharging this liquid , the tanks were sampled to ensure they were within Federal (US 10 CFR 20, Table II, MPCW) limits. After this was guaranteed, the water was safely discharged at sea.

Significantly radioactive material, such as ion exchanger resin or any such, was not discharged at sea but rather at approved facilities such as that at Todd Shipyards, Galveston Texas or else onto dedicated servicing barge NSV ATOMIC SERVANT. No solid materials were dumped at sea.

Shang
05-09-2017, 07:50 PM
The Hanford site has been notorious for leaking rad-wastes for more than forty years--what did you think us tree-huggers were talking about...?