PDA

View Full Version : any body here use a hatchet for woodworking?



Paul Pless
05-02-2017, 01:59 PM
What do you use it for it for?
What're your favourite pattern and maker? Why?

Canoez
05-02-2017, 02:10 PM
Sounds like a hatchet-job to me.

amish rob
05-02-2017, 02:16 PM
No way. That's dumb. What kind of slack jawed maniac would use a hatchet for wood work?
You can't cross cut or rip a board with one.
Nor rive a small board.
Nor cut any joints at all.
You couldn't even use one as a plane, slick, or scraper if you tried.
Dumb.

Peace,
Robert

P.S. :)

birlinn
05-02-2017, 02:21 PM
The Viking boat builders managed pretty well with side axes..

Canoez
05-02-2017, 02:25 PM
No way. That's dumb. What kind of slack jawed maniac would use a hatchet for wood work?
You can't cross cut or rip a board with one.
Nor rive a small board.
Nor cut any joints at all.
You couldn't even use one as a plane, slick, or scraper if you tried.
Dumb.

Peace,
Robert

P.S. :)

This one.

:D

For quick "roughing". Sometimes for getting a "flat" to start jointing a piece of wood to further mill.

I've got an old Plumb hatchet.

Jimmy W
05-02-2017, 02:27 PM
I used one of these to rough out a stick of wood for a bow, before changing over to a draw-knife. I also chopped down a couple of small trees and chopped through some poison ivy vines with it recently.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/31-g%2BEzps4L._SX355_.jpg

Todd Bradshaw
05-02-2017, 02:35 PM
I bought one a while back, inspired by seeing Norwegian boatbuilders carve twisted garboards with a similar one. So far.... the only good thing I've done with it was to chase a couple of burglars out of my garage one night at 3:AM. It worked, and when I whacked one guy in the shoulder with it as he tried to run away, I got a free backpack full of GPS units - including mine.

I haven't yet been able to do anything on wood with it that was more than a literal hack job. At the time I bought it though, Woodcraft was carrying them and they weren't terribly expensive. I didn't really care how much use I would get out of it. It was just a really cool tool.

http://webpages.charter.net/tbradshaw/Music%20stuff/axe.jpg

amish rob
05-02-2017, 02:39 PM
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h62/kitchenfiddle/IMG_1292_zpsdhghoiok.jpg (http://s61.photobucket.com/user/kitchenfiddle/media/IMG_1292_zpsdhghoiok.jpg.html)
This type is practically useless. Axes don't fall far from the tree, I guess. :d
Oh, I got a regular old Nessmuk type small axe/hatchet I use for dirty work. It has a thicker wedge than this blade.

Peace,
Robert

Draketail
05-02-2017, 02:44 PM
Granfors Bruks carpenter's hatchet. Great for shaping various odd parts of Chesapeake style work boats. Just keep it shaving sharp and tackle anybody that even thinks about splitting kindling with it.

delecta
05-02-2017, 02:45 PM
Comes in pretty handy when nailing red cedar shingles on a building. One of them that I have is sharpened on both the face and underside, makes quick work out of laced corners.

David G
05-02-2017, 02:46 PM
I've used a hatchet to create 'sapling furniture' and 'log furniture' when camping at one site for a while. I've used a hatchet to rough out stems and spars. Have owned a variety over the years, but nothing fancy. The nicest has been the current one from Fiskars. I like the nifty carrying/hanging/protective case. Takes and holds an impressive edge. If this isn't the same model, it's mighty close --

http://www.survivalgearstore.survivalgearguru.com/wp-content/uploads/Fiskars-X7-Hatchet.jpg
http://www.thehydrosource.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/x/7/x7-hatchet-14.jpg

isla
05-02-2017, 03:03 PM
I bought an old Swedish hatchet from a funny little junk shop in Aberdeen. And then the murders began.

TomF
05-02-2017, 03:06 PM
Not for real-live woodworking for indoors quality stuff, but I use a khukuri for a whole lot of rougher tasks. Works like a drawknife too. I used to have an Estwing, but it went the way of all flesh.

At some point in my dotage I'm gonna try something like Todd's. If only because it looks so damned cool.

Peerie Maa
05-02-2017, 03:07 PM
Got one of these. Hafted it myself with an appropriate hang to the shaft.

http://i408.photobucket.com/albums/pp164/peerie_maa/GEDC0119_zpstg7wjhpo.jpg
I last used it to rough out the haft for a hatchet, before putting it on the shave horse.

Canoez
05-02-2017, 03:20 PM
I bought an old Swedish hatchet from a funny little junk shop in Aberdeen. And then the murders began.

:d:d:d

Paul Pless
05-02-2017, 03:24 PM
Rofl

Canoez
05-02-2017, 03:26 PM
"What day is today?", asked Pooh...

John Meachen
05-02-2017, 03:26 PM
I have used one,but only for converting mistakes to kindling.

John of Phoenix
05-02-2017, 03:46 PM
"What day is today?", asked Pooh...That was hilarious.

Canoez
05-02-2017, 03:48 PM
That was hilarious.

I see it got a "share". :d

Breakaway
05-02-2017, 03:56 PM
Got your Totin' Chip?




http://usscouts.org/advance/Images/Boyscout/totin-chip.jpg


Kevin

lupussonic
05-02-2017, 04:18 PM
I may be the only Cornishman with a BSA Totin' chip, like anywhere in the world, probably.

Bobcat
05-02-2017, 04:19 PM
You axin' me about dat?

L.W. Baxter
05-02-2017, 04:51 PM
You're not a true hack until you've cut a sheet of oriented-strand board with a claw hammer.

Peerie Maa
05-02-2017, 04:58 PM
You're not a true hack until you've cut a sheet of oriented-strand board with a claw hammer.

Only works with a framers hammer.

Try with this one and you may as well use a mallet.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71l5TyL4xTL._SL1500_.jpg

L.W. Baxter
05-02-2017, 05:03 PM
Yes, well, goes without saying, the only hammer for the genuine hack is a framing hammer.

wizbang 13
05-02-2017, 05:05 PM
Regularly. Influenced by West Indian chippies.

Garret
05-02-2017, 05:17 PM
I work firewood into kindling with one regularly. Oh - that doesn't count?

And - a framing hammer is good for making holes in OSB too - sometimes on purpose...

bobbys
05-02-2017, 05:24 PM
Cutting stakes for footings. Or cutting the angle end.They have pre cut ones now.

Installing shakes..

Cutting off the angle where the ceiling joists extend over the rafters, mostly trusses now so not used anymore.. It was faster to cut with the axe then try and cut the joists..

Holding up and screaming if a OSHA inspector came by of any other gubermeant Offical..
I have the one I bought in 1972 still mainly used for camping..

So I suppose paul can still call me a hack.....

Garret
05-02-2017, 05:29 PM
Cutting stakes for footings. Or cutting the angle end.They have pre cut ones now.

Installing shakes..

Cutting off the angle where the ceiling joists extend over the rafters, mostly trusses now so not used anymore.. It was faster to cut with the axe then try and cut the joists..

Holding up and screaming if a OSHA inspector came by of any other gubermeant Offical..
I have the one I bought in 1972 still mainly used for camping..

So I suppose paul can still call me a hack.....

Fer sher it's the tool for cedar shakes.

Chris Coose
05-02-2017, 05:53 PM
Most every cold day to split trash wood for kindle.

Regular woodwork, maybe a couple dozen times working pointy items.

bobbys
05-02-2017, 10:03 PM
You're not a true hack until you've cut a sheet of oriented-strand board with a claw hammer.
.

I refuse to use OSB, drink brew beer, wear DUCKS hats and shirts, use the crosswalks,buy from Starbucks,did I mention I refuse to use OSB board.

In a nutshell , Im better then you!(g)

bobbys
05-02-2017, 10:04 PM
.

I refuse to use OSB, drink brew beer, wear DUCKS hats and shirts, use the crosswalks,buy from Starbucks,did I mention I refuse to use OSB board.

In a nutshell , Im better then you!(g).

Never mind, I do a lot of roofing.........

Jim Bow
05-02-2017, 10:26 PM
How bout this guy

https://youtu.be/MwB71PSlXs4

BrianY
05-02-2017, 11:04 PM
Unfortunately too many of my projects look as if I used a hatchet on them due to my lack of skill.

LongJohn
05-03-2017, 01:46 AM
My wife's grandfather was an old-school craftsman. My MIL (and FIL) ended up with some of his tools - including a nice broadaxe. MIL and FIL retired to southern Virginia and had a log house built in the woods, but the fireplace needed a mantle, so FIL and I cut down a nice straight tulip tree, roughed it out, let it cure, and then hewed out a big honkin' mantle (maybe 4" x 10" x 10') with grandpa's broadaxe. Fun project and a handsome mantle that suited the house.

When MIL died, wife's cousin claimed priority on most of the old tools. No argument from me, but I still wish I had that broadaxe and a few of the other tools...

- John

doorstop
05-03-2017, 03:26 AM
A decent side axe is axually a nice tool to swing and if used sensibly can give a nice finish..

wizbang 13
05-03-2017, 05:47 AM
Two mis aligned tools on the woodboatforum I suppose, grinder and a hatchet.
In my early days of boat fixin in the PNW, I carried both in my first trip to the dock or yard.
No goofy lookin caulkin mallet, no antique Stanley plane, no razor sharp Japanese chisel.
Just an ordinary $20 hatchet. Not a GOT fantasy fighting tool.

sharpiefan
05-03-2017, 09:03 AM
Richard Proenneke (click) (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Proenneke)knew his way around hand tools. His book, "One Man's Wilderness", is a good read. Some years back, PBS had a show based on his book and home movies, "Alone in the Wilderness" (click) (https://youtube.com/watch?v=iYJKd0rkKss). There was also a follow-up show, made some years later.



Proenneke's cabin is hand-made and is notable for its remarkable craftsmanship due to his skill as a carpenter and wood worker, and because of the films he made of the complete construction procedure. Most of the structure and the furnishings are made from materials in and about the site.....

In 2007 Proenneke's cabin (click) (http://www.aloneinthewilderness.com/building_the_cabin.html)was included in the National Register of Historic Places.


http://www.aloneinthewilderness.com/images/home/dick_proenneke_dutch_doors.jpg

bobbys
05-03-2017, 09:13 AM
I hope paul does not read this, him being a purist and all but I have chopped up blocks of tar for the kettle.

I did clean it up after though.

Ian McColgin
05-03-2017, 09:15 AM
You really haven's lived till you've seen a Portuguese boatwright do almost everything with a enxs (pronounced en-shaw).

http://www.leevalley.com/us/images/item/woodworking/logbuild/59u2001.jpg

I found this pic at Lee Valley so I guess you can get one if so inclined.

Canoez
05-03-2017, 09:21 AM
You really haven's lived till you've seen a Portuguese boatwright do almost everything with a enxs (pronounced en-shaw).

http://www.leevalley.com/us/images/item/woodworking/logbuild/59u2001.jpg

I found this pic at Lee Valley so I guess you can get one if so inclined.

Is the blade curved for backing out planks?

Breakaway
05-03-2017, 09:34 AM
I may be the only Cornishman with a BSA Totin' chip, like anywhere in the world, probably.





I am sure you are, Lupo! :)

Another use: I use a hatchet for trimming reed stems even, and to length, when grassing a duck blind or duck boat.

Kevin

Ian McColgin
05-03-2017, 09:40 AM
I knew an old immigrant boatwright who was going to give me some of his tools but shortly after his death and before his daughter could get me out there they were all stolen. But from what I recall, he had several, some ground and sharpened with a little more curve to the cutting edge and some less. I don't recall any where the body of the blade was itself scooped.

He could take off a feather of wood fine as most any plane and tackle anything from squaring a foot diameter log to rounding a large square balk to sharpening a pencil.

sharpiefan
05-03-2017, 09:43 AM
In "Flotsam and Jetsam" http://robbwhite.com/i/flotsam.and.jetsam.cover.100.jpg(click) (https://www.amazon.com/dp/1891369830?tag=robwhiboaanda-20&camp=14573&creative=327641&linkCode=as1&creativeASIN=1891369830&adid=0Y1FM1WMBMFS64PQF37C&), Robb White (click) (http://www.robbwhite.com/ ) tells of being stationed a Navy base in Puerto Rico and watching some fellows hand-building a boat; one of them used nothing but a machete to make ribs and interior fittings.

Boater14
05-03-2017, 10:21 AM
Spoon and bowl carvers use then for roughing out.

Jim Ledger
05-03-2017, 10:31 AM
You really haven's lived till you've seen a Portuguese boatwright do almost everything with a enxs (pronounced en-shaw).

http://www.leevalley.com/us/images/item/woodworking/logbuild/59u2001.jpg

I found this pic at Lee Valley so I guess you can get one if so inclined.


Sorry, Ian, but I had one of those. Don't waste your money. Which is not to say that there aren't versions of this tool that would work, it's just that this isn't one of them. That's a cheaply made, mass produced blade of poor shape, made from low grade steel. Even if it were to take an edge you have to wonder what sort of cutting it's supposed to accomplish..

Stiletto
05-03-2017, 06:14 PM
https://img1.etsystatic.com/147/1/12080790/il_340x270.1231546813_kqav.jpg

I had one of these for years until it got destroyed when my house burnt down.

Ron Williamson
05-03-2017, 07:25 PM
Sorry, Ian, but I had one of those. Don't waste your money. Which is not to say that there aren't versions of this tool that would work, it's just that this isn't one of them. That's a cheaply made, mass produced blade of poor shape, made from low grade steel. Even if it were to take an edge you have to wonder what sort of cutting it's supposed to accomplish..

I tried a real two handed adze a few times and it was hard enough.
What really impressed me was the perfectly adzed interior of a Salish(?)dugout canoe.
R

Cuyahoga Chuck
05-03-2017, 09:25 PM
What do you use it for it for?
What're your favourite pattern and maker? Why?

Don't you watch Roy Underhill?
There are two categories of hatchets and axes used in woodwrighting, felling, where both sides of the edge are beveled and a broad which is flat on one side and beveled on the other. For working a piece of wood down in a hurry you can't beat a broad hatchet. I came up with two for 5 bucks a piece. They were made by True Temper. Cement contractors had used them to trim out their forms . The two I had had been beveled on the flat side but I was able to bring them back on a surface grinder. They are neat tools, very sharp, but I can't say I used them very much.

trefor
05-04-2017, 11:37 AM
https://img1.etsystatic.com/147/1/12080790/il_340x270.1231546813_kqav.jpg

I had one of these for years until it got destroyed when my house burnt down.


I took a rusty one of those (carpenter/rigger's hatchet) and did this with it. I cut down an old axe handle, reshaped it and made something more akin to a forest axe. It can now be used two-handed more easily.

Before:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7378/12749825054_222831fb72_z.jpg

After:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3787/12771948463_6fb6ef2dac_z.jpg

Paul Pless
05-04-2017, 11:43 AM
I cut down an old axe handle, reshaped it and made something more akin to a forest axe. It can now be used two-handed more easily.


and then the murders began

Jimmy W
05-04-2017, 11:54 AM
Careful With That Axe Eugene


https://youtu.be/JpLS2ru-iwk

Peerie Maa
05-04-2017, 01:33 PM
I took a rusty one of those (carpenter/rigger's hatchet) and did this with it. I cut down an old axe handle, reshaped it and made something more akin to a forest axe. It can now be used two-handed more easily.

Before:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7378/12749825054_222831fb72_z.jpg

After:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3787/12771948463_6fb6ef2dac_z.jpg

That is more like a slaters or tilers hatchet.

wudzgud
05-04-2017, 02:41 PM
"I got an axe right here, wanna see it, here it is. I like to keep it razor sharp, you know, slice off a little shoulder here, a little knee there. Why, I've been known to circumcise a gnat, bug...gnat, a little similarity there, oooooooooooooh"
John Candy, Uncle Buck