PDA

View Full Version : This is my ideal...



leikec
04-27-2017, 10:36 AM
Model railroad photo.

http://www.railmaster.co.nz/gallery/sn3/images/4-4-0%20PScoles.jpg


The Pelican Bay Railway & Navigation Co., built in Sn3 by the late Paul Scoles, who was one of the great guys you would ever want to meet.

Here on the forum our own Todd Bradshaw does great work in N scale.

Jeff C

Paul Pless
04-27-2017, 10:37 AM
yeah, that's pretty realistic

thanks for posting it

leikec
04-27-2017, 10:41 AM
I couldn't figure out a way to work the word 'Trump' into the thread title, so this thread will sink fast...

Jeff C

David G
04-27-2017, 10:45 AM
Whatever floats your locomotive <G> Amazing work.

John of Phoenix
04-27-2017, 10:46 AM
That landscaping is amazing.

Ian McColgin
04-27-2017, 11:07 AM
Wow.

amish rob
04-27-2017, 11:17 AM
It is nice.

I think the train is too clean looking.

9/10 of these shots is the photographer. This is a great shot.

Peace,
Trapped in a Family of Foamers

CWSmith
04-27-2017, 11:56 AM
I have a tremendous admiration for scale railroads, but no talent or time. I really like that!

LeeG
04-27-2017, 11:59 AM
Trippy

isla
04-27-2017, 02:25 PM
That is fantastic. I used to do some work in N gauge, and I made bushes from lichen, but nothing like that. Those trees are amazing.

Keith Wilson
04-27-2017, 02:54 PM
Very nice! The only reason it doesn't look 100% real is that the train is too clean.

amish rob
04-27-2017, 03:03 PM
Very nice! The only reason it doesn't look 100% real is that the train is too clean.
Haha.

That's what I said. :)

Peace,
Robert

Jim Bow
04-27-2017, 03:30 PM
How about this photo of scale model cars, using a forced perspective background?
http://www.thisiscolossal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/mini-3.jpg

Jim Bow
04-27-2017, 03:33 PM
Here's his setup for the photo.

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/mini-4.jpg

John of Phoenix
04-27-2017, 03:50 PM
That is SO slick.
---------

Weathering is an art unto itself.

Todd Bradshaw
04-27-2017, 05:04 PM
He really did a great job on the trees, and you wouldn't believe how many of them it takes to start looking realistic. As for weathering, some folks do, others don't do any. I probably do about half of mine, just depending on how unrealistic they look in their original, factory condition. It can get quite tedious and tricky, especially with small locomotives where you pretty much need to disassemble them, weather the parts individually and then put them back together. In the mean time, you have to maintain clean surfaces where electrical stuff happens and remember how all the bits fit, so that it will work again when finished.

I used to buy and weather a couple of N Scale steam locos each winter and then auction them off on eBay. I work over a big piece of waffle foam, to help catch any tiny screws, springs or other pieces that may get dropped, or flip out of the tweezers (which does happen occasionally, and I've spent more time than I care to admit crawling around on the floor with a flashlight, looking for some tiny non-replaceable piece). I can certainly see why some people simply refuse to mess with weathering. Plus, it can change the resale value of the piece - in either direction, depending on how well done it is, or not. The "donor" locos have gotten quite expensive, so I don't do many these days. This year I did a re-paint and fantasy conversion of a Swedish electric loco to a simulated Pennsylvania Railroad Boxcab, as it's about as close as you can get using what's available, but I didn't do any steamers.

http://webpages.charter.net/tbradshaw/Music%20stuff/mal1-006.jpg

http://webpages.charter.net/tbradshaw/Music%20stuff/Mike4.jpg

Peerie Maa
04-27-2017, 05:12 PM
I work over a big piece of waffle foam, to help catch any tiny screws, springs or other pieces that may get dropped, or flip out of the tweezers (which does happen occasionally, and I've spent more time than I care to admit crawling around on the floor with a flashlight, looking for some tiny non-replaceable piece).



I use an idea borrowed from silver and goldsmiths. I tape the hem of a joiners apron to the edge of the work table, so that anything dropped lands in my (wide) lap.

Just have to remember to take the apron off before walking away.

leikec
04-27-2017, 09:37 PM
The layout is built in Sn3, and the locomotive and the cars were built from kits. Two things regarding the lack of weathering--first, remember that the bright lighting for the photo exaggerates the shine of the paint on the equipment. Also, Paul was modeling a busy, profitable line from the late 1800's, and photos from that time period show that much of the equipment was maintained to an extremely high standard.

Jeff C

amish rob
04-27-2017, 09:44 PM
The layout is built in Sn3, and the locomotive and the cars were built from kits. Two things regarding the lack of weathering--first, remember that the bright lighting for the photo exaggerates the shine of the paint on the equipment. Also, Paul was modeling a busy, profitable line from the late 1800's, and photos from that time period show that much of the equipment was maintained to an extremely high standard.

Jeff C

The seeming extra cleanness of the train detracts not one whit from the masterful craftsmanship. It is merely the slightest hint of a seam in the exquisite tapestry.

These are ALL examples of the finest craftsmanship I've ever seen, and I've seen maybe 198,764,876,678 miles of scale track layout in my life. Train shows, museums, videos, train stores, train yards...
I still have a whole mess of tiny rails spikes. I'll have to look. Not me, mind you. I'm an enabler, and a casual fan, but not a real former.:)

Anyway, please post more of his work, or a link, and pass on the compliment. It's lovely stuff.

Peace,
Robert

Gerarddm
04-27-2017, 11:06 PM
Beautiful work. Kudos.

leikec
04-27-2017, 11:17 PM
https://markpaulson.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/h3100001.jpg


Paul did very nice work, and he inspired an entire generation of narrow gauge modelers through his articles in model railroad magazines, his videos, and his modeling clinics at shows around the country.
Jeff C

Garret
04-28-2017, 06:07 AM
The detail is truly astounding. My favorite little thing is the out of kilter telegraph pole. The skill, and even more, patience is way beyond my skills!