PDA

View Full Version : 3M tack pads



Ian Marchuk
04-03-2017, 10:20 PM
I've been refinising and alaskan bulkhead on our stinkpot. After several coats of epiphanes woodfinish gloss I worked it down a bit to level it and work out some of the usual whoopses. I had applied the vanish while hung vertically to lessen dust drop.
On impulse I bought 3M tack pads at a local auto finishing supplier. These look somewhat like very fine scotch brite with a tack surface. They worked very well at tacking off for the wipe down immediately before laying varnish. I applied the epi on the horizontal surface this time, succeeding in laying down a heavier coat and filling what had seemed like a mildly mottled surface.
After and hour or so the varnish leveled nicely... BUT... there was a mild clouding effect.
The mild clouding persists now... 24 hours later
I strongly suspect the tack pads, as they are the only differing factor. All other procedures and conditions are the same.
On reflection, I realize that "modern" finishing aids are for "modern" finishes. Given that modern auto finishes are water based thes tack pads are probably the ducks gronicles for a water based finish, but not for a hot varnish.
Lesson learned... stick with what you know has worked well in the past.
I will be giving the tack pads to a friend in the auto business, and ask forgiveness from my box of Gerson tack cloths.
I am not hopeful that more coats of varnish will lessen the cloudiness. I wait to see how the finish holds up over time.
If it works, don't fix it.

pcford
04-03-2017, 10:59 PM
Hope persists. May have sucked up some humidity from our soggy environment. Wait a few days, see if it changes. If not recoat...see where you are then.
good luck.

Ian Marchuk
04-03-2017, 11:41 PM
Words of wisdom from the vicah of vahnish.
It has been a tad more dampish around here with spring runoff and all. But this is a very dry area usually.
This is in a heated shop with lots of wood stored inside that does mitigate humidity changes.
Previous coats applied under the same conditions were fine, excepting the usual whoopses of course.
I have five coats on now and will carry on with several more, keeping in mind your optiism: it will be OK 'cause our vicah said so...
Best wishes to you Mr. Ford, I will keep you posted as to the end results.
Ian

pcford
04-03-2017, 11:55 PM
Words of wisdom from the vicah of vahnish.
It has been a tad more dampish around here with spring runoff and all. But this is a very dry area usually.
This is in a heated shop with lots of wood stored inside that does mitigate humidity changes.
Previous coats applied under the same conditions were fine, excepting the usual whoopses of course.
I have five coats on now and will carry on with several more, keeping in mind your optiism: it will be OK 'cause our vicah said so...
Best wishes to you Mr. Ford, I will keep you posted as to the end results.
Ian

Well, I did not necessarily promise that all would be well...though I think I would bet on it. However, I do remember problems with tack rags occasionally...can't remember what the issue was...but I do not believe I had to remove the coating.
(Loss of memory is sometimes a blessing of old age. By the way, I am more of a country deacon than the vicar of varnish.)

ulav8r
04-04-2017, 09:04 PM
If the cloudiness is due to humidity, allow it to dissipate before putting more finish over it. Otherwise, you will be sealing in the moisture.

OceanChris
04-04-2017, 09:31 PM
If the cloudiness is due to humidity, allow it to dissipate before putting more finish over it. Otherwise, you will be sealing in the moisture.

I learned that the hard way. When i was recoating the small boat i have at my summer location the waether was damp and guess what happend T_T. Least to say i have learned that lesson and these days i check the weather AND pull the boat up into the big shed instead of close to the water...

David G
04-04-2017, 10:18 PM
Tack rags are meant to be used with a very light touch. More like a magnet picking up filings than a scotchbrite scraping slime off the waterline. If you scrub with them... they can contaminate the surface.

Another tip for coaxing out a haze due to varnishing. in humid conditions. A light wipedown with a clean rag gently doused with denatured alcohol.

Ian Marchuk
04-08-2017, 09:28 PM
Thank you for the feedback and pointers, gents.
After 24 hours the mild haze cleared off and subsequent coats have not shown a haze. Thank you Vicah.
David, your suggestion re the light touch with the tack cloth may have been the key in this case.
As a galoot with a size thirteen shirt and size three hat I probably need to lighten my touch with tack cloth. Good point.
I'm using epi woodfinish gloss. Epi tells me that subsequent coats applied within 72 hours do not require sanding.
This has made it easier for a varnish newbie to build thickness more quickly. In the past, I tended to oversand because of all the whoopses beginners make.
After several coats harden off, I can use a cabinet scraper on the ham handed bits then 220 followed by scotch brite.
I started out with the panels hung vertically to avoid dust settling. I wasn't too happy with the results. So I cobbled together some clear poly into a paint booth. Varnishing in the flat yielded better results. But, dust was still showing.
I bought a tyvek painting coverall, and that seems to have cut down the dust factor. i think that a lot of the "dust" was lint and dry skin bits.
So, to sum up, I am seeing a consistent improvement as I carry on.
Thanks to you, my friends for your advice and encouragement.
Best wishes,
Ian

BTW.... I dabbed a bit of turps and epi on my earlobes hoping that darling would show some interest.
Dunno how that is going to turn out... any further advice in that department?????
Thank you for your sage advice...

Canoeyawl
04-08-2017, 09:35 PM
There was a manufacturer of premium tack cloths that posted here some years ago. Very informative, all tack rags are not created equally... or not even close as it turns out.
For years I was gun shy of tack rags and just went with a clean surface.
I wonder if we can find that thread?

Garret
04-08-2017, 09:37 PM
...BTW.... I dabbed a bit of turps and epi on my earlobes hoping that darling would show some interest.
Dunno how that is going to turn out... any further advice in that department?????
Thank you for your sage advice...

Hope she doesn't brush you off - but at least you'll be a little thinner. Oh - make sure you don't tell her about being tacky! :)

Canoeyawl
04-08-2017, 09:39 PM
Here we go.
A lot of generous and helpful information at least for me!

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?161951-about-Tack-Cloths-(tack-rags)

Ian Marchuk
04-08-2017, 10:59 PM
Garret, I have my tacky moments alright, and thinner would help.
Mebbe I'll be rolled out before I'm brushed off.
I remain an incorrigible optimist.

Ian Marchuk
04-08-2017, 11:12 PM
Thank you Canoeyawl that thread is gold.

Jay Greer
04-09-2017, 07:03 PM
There are some people that are not aware that a tack rag should be completely unfolded, prior to use, and lightly gathered together. It is then gently passed over the surface. One rag will last a lone time as it can be re-wadded to present a new surface. Heavy pressure can transfer the wax they contain to the surface to be painted and ruin your entire day!
Jay