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View Full Version : What knife would you carry every day, if there were no restrictions?



TomF
02-21-2017, 10:35 AM
A while ago I wrote on the pocketknife thread that what I'd really like is to carry a fixed blade knife. Even a pretty slightly built fixed blade knife is stronger object than most things built with a hinge in the middle. Even over-built versions.

So One who shall be Nameless asked what I'd want to carry every day, if I weren't worried that people would get freaked by the sight of an actual knife. If there weren't this or that pesky bit of legislation or regulation that might get in the way of My Damned Freedom. ;)

Hmm. For me, "form follows function." I'm not going to choose a blade for fightin' off zombies or islamophobes; not so many of either in my day-to-day to justify humping around my khukuri. :D Not a lot of matters of honour to be settled these days either, so I guess that rules out either a dress version of military sabre or a courtly small-sword, even though either would accessorize rather well with the incoming fashion for g(u)ilt. I hate being a slave to fashion. But what I'd carry probably depends on the day, and what kind of stuff I could envision myself doing.

Graham Knives makes something they call a "Razel." Combines a knife blade and a chisel point, in a variety of different style variations. The blade design in the middle below seems kinda interesting, though I'd prefer a handle like the one above and a little belly to the blade. While the quasi-hawkbill on top looks better to my eye, I've had a couple of hawkbill knives and they just haven't been too useful for me in how I use a knife. The inward curve might be great for stripping wire or giving a strong point ... but I've found a convex curve or a straight blade much better for shaping wood or etc. I can imagine benefits for that chisel end, but can't tell from the pics whether the whole blade/chisel is ground like a chisel (i.e. that there's a flat back) or if it's all V-shaped. The one would compromise knife function, the other chisel function. Either, though, would still be pretty robust, and beat the hell out of a dinky little pocket knife if you had to apply some force to something.
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/558639d9e4b04f0a4c072377/55864036e4b0ceb9559ed28a/558640fae4b0bb81f47f14eb/1434861819080/1516226_1505688753007525_799580077_n.jpg?format=30 0w

A little bird and trout style knife would be great. While I like some with a ring at the end, this one by Jerry Hossom caught my eye. Tiny little blade, slim enough profile to not be a big deal to carry, and the enlarged pommel would make it secure in the hand and easy to draw from the sheath. Blade's only 2", and the knife is 7" overall.
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/e1/95/08/e19508e29ded31c21fabfe5320b05aa7.jpg

Keith Wilson
02-21-2017, 10:50 AM
The same one I do now. The blades are the least of it.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61HNZwOYAaL._SY355_.jpg

David G
02-21-2017, 10:55 AM
I'm pretty happy with my present setup. Folder in the right front pocket on a lanyard clipped to the belt loop. I can have it out and open in a trice - without the ever-present obtrusiveness of a belt sheath. Both my work and play have too many things for a sheath to snag on.

If I were situated so that a belt knife made sense... oh, what a world of possibilities. I wouldn't likely go with anything exotic. Just your basic fixed blade of maybe 3.5". Something like this --

https://www.crkt.com/pub/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/920x412/beff4985b56e3afdbeabfc89641a4582/h/t/httpimages.salsify.comimageuploads--6n9ouqsv--c_padw_1840h_824fl_clip.png8joyvrulomkzrpr72ybvc.p ng

TomF
02-21-2017, 11:03 AM
Yeah Keith, but. I've carried one of those off and on forever. But mostly "off" nowadays; it's been on my dresser for a few months.

Other screwdrivers (even small ones) are better, and can live in my computer case. I've never once used the awl and liked it ;), and the can opener kinda sucks too. The bottle opener's nice, but I've a tiny-but-better one on my keychain ... and somehow I don't use one as much anymore ;). Either coffee, or sharing a growler, or screw-tops. If I need a corkscrew, I'm usually at home where I've got others that work better. So a blade that does blade things well is what I need. Cutting/opening stuff, jimmying something to make it fit. Sometimes scraping off something.

I dunno if that Razel would be useful or a pain in the butt - wouldn't know till I lived with it for a while, I suspect.

David, I like using a little dangler sheath hanging off my belt, like they make for Scandinavian knives. Means it swings out of the way when bumped, so the knife doesn't catch on stuff or poke you in the butt when you sit down. But you can tuck the tip end into your pocket if for one reason or another it's got annoying.

Old Dryfoot
02-21-2017, 11:04 AM
I like a knife you can build a cabin with.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n74/lewis_the_killer/Z3_zps38c30e6e.jpg%7Eoriginal

Jimmy W
02-21-2017, 11:07 AM
I would probably continue carrying my Kershaw Leek.

http://www.kershaw-knives.net/images/Kershaw-Leek-1660CKT-350x350.gif

For a fixed blade, I really like my Grohmann D.H. Russell Canadian Belt Knife

http://104.236.16.159/wp-content/uploads/2006/07/Grohman%20Knife%20Canada%20Design.jpg

Captain Intrepid
02-21-2017, 11:17 AM
I'd continue carrying my opinel 7 carbone, a knife should be cheap enough to abuse.

Canoez
02-21-2017, 11:23 AM
The same one I do now. The blades are the least of it.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61HNZwOYAaL._SY355_.jpg


+1000!

amish rob
02-21-2017, 11:23 AM
I carry a really thick-spined Gerber drop point fixed blade, but I'd take one of them Canadian belt knives like Jimmy has.:)

Peace,
Robert

Jim Bow
02-21-2017, 11:39 AM
I would have a Randall knife, because I like the song.

https://youtu.be/KY5MOUO464Q

ahp
02-21-2017, 12:13 PM
None

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
02-21-2017, 12:51 PM
I used to carry a medium sized multitool (what used to be full-sized), a Leatherman PSTII. Now I carry a mini, a Leatherman Squirt PS4, which will do quite a lot, and fits in my watch pocket. Still can't bring it on planes, prior to 9/11 I would frequently carry the PSTII.

I agree that a fixed blade with a chisel tip is quite functional, as in the day-to-day life of a craftsperson, that chisel tip is handy to scrape things. But I personally would go for a little style, not flashy, but a pleasing shape, accessorizing if you will :)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/55/Sharpfingerknife.jpg

3-1/2" blade. I have an old carbon steel USA one just like that, I like the shape and the thick blade, especially through the handle. I artificially aged it with some Ospho so the steel looks like a 50 year old carbon steel Sabatier that's been cutting a lot of lemons. They're still available, but stainless and made in China, though a good deal on a fixed blade, especially for young folks, inexpensive and not large in size. And the lanyard hole is a plus. (A fixed blade, in my opinion, is much preferred for hunting, as you don't have to worry about blood and hair and such getting into the pivots of a folder.) Anyway, whenever I strap on the 152, I've gotten inquiries and compliments. :) But in my current day to day, I frequently carry a 3-1/2" forged kitchen knife, because my adventures are more in cooking these days, and the straight blade shape is better for that.

Another design I like, somebody was thinking.
https://www.starlex.fi/verkkokauppa/images/crkt5500_hi_0903_78d.jpgkiss_0903_78d.jpg

I prefer no serrations, much easier to sharpen. However on all of these single bevel folders, the bevel is on the left (for easier right-hand deployment), and as a right hander, I would prefer the bevel to starboard; if you are cutting salami off the right end, left bevel makes it impossible to cut straight, but right bevel works great. If I am skinning fish with skin side down, laying the left (flat) side against the skin and slicing to my right works best. That's how sushi knives are set up. On their fixed blade designs, they did it right:

http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/-YcAAOSwUV9WoOb8/s-l300.jpg

Breakaway
02-21-2017, 01:08 PM
I wouldn't carry a fixed. I'd still carry a folder. Any task for which a fixed comes up, I will have planned for, or have access to it. The carry knife is for convenient, opportunistic use as things come up (or not) in the course of a day. For instance, I keep fixed blade knives aboard my boat and there is a 6-inch sheath knife in the toolbox in my truck.

My 1973 cub scout issue has been serving my pocket uses well for almost five decades ( I've had a few dalliances with Leathermen, but came back). Mine is just like this one.

http://img-fotki.yandex.ru/get/4611/24879594.6/0_62845_1292fb88_XL.jpg

Kevin

Todd D
02-21-2017, 01:11 PM
None. Except for a couple of years in grade school when I had a small pocket knife, I have never needed or carried a knife.

seanz
02-21-2017, 01:14 PM
Gasp!

Jimmy W
02-21-2017, 01:20 PM
I also own an Old Timer Sharpfinger like this. I think that I found it at a campsite in the mountains of Georgia 30 to 40 years ago. I made a sheath for it.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/55/Sharpfingerknife.jpg

David W Pratt
02-21-2017, 01:22 PM
Prolly the same 3 blade Gerber I do today.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
02-21-2017, 01:27 PM
I also own an Old Timer Sharpfinger like this. I think that I found it at a campsite in the mountains of Georgia 30 to 40 years ago. I made a sheath for it.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/55/Sharpfingerknife.jpg

I've always had a fascination with utilitarian things, that also had an aesthetically pleasing shape, someone put effort into the design. A knife, a small manual typewriter from the art-deco era, one of those expensive wood planes that I can't think of the name. But especially, little things you use every day. A quality pen or mechanical pencil, in the days when people hand-wrote a lot.

CWSmith
02-21-2017, 01:35 PM
Tom, those knives are lovely, but Keith and Kevin have the right idea.

Jimmy W
02-21-2017, 01:35 PM
I wouldn't want to carry it around all the time, but for a knife to build a cabin with, there is my USMC Hospital Corps Knife.

http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd41/jimmywga/USMC%20knife_zpsz6pw4dcb.jpg

seanz
02-21-2017, 01:39 PM
http://www.svord.com/index.php?id_product=72&controller=product

:D

TomF
02-21-2017, 01:56 PM
Tom, those knives are lovely, but Keith and Kevin have the right idea.To a degree, sure. But to a degree, I'm with William Morris: "Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful." I figure that the chisel-tip knives may at least be useful, and the little bird-and-trout knife ticks both of those boxes. While I've carried a few Swiss Army Knives over the years - most of my life, probably - the industrial design of them doesn't appeal to the "beauty" thing for me anymore. And I wonder if for the purpose I nowadays tend to put to a knife, if something else might be more useful.

A SAK was exactly what I used when I was out hiking and camping more; the little saw, in particular, was really useful at times. I sorta like the design curves of the Sharpfinger, and sorta don't. Were I to be doing a fair bit of hunting, though, the curve might prove brilliant for skinning.

One thing I've wondered about, actually, is there's a guy on Ebay who's allegedly selling off forged but un-ground blanks of antique Sabatier professional kitchen knives. I've considered getting a 3 1/2" or 4" blade from him, and completing it to be a small belt knife. If one left the ground knife maybe 25% beefier than a kitchen knife of the same size, you'd be starting with a very well proven Chef's knife shape in a size that I use a lot in the kitchen.

Nicholas Scheuer
02-21-2017, 02:09 PM
What are the big holes for , Tom? I can understand little holes for a lanyard, but those big ones don't seem suitable for flipping the cap off a Molsons, eh?

TomF
02-21-2017, 02:49 PM
Big holes are so that when you need to use your fingers for something else for a minute, the knife hangs from your little finger. Don't have to put it down, or in the sheath, or etc. - it stays right there. I've seen the idea from time to time with other tools (e.g. light spring-loaded shears), but paid attention the first time when I saw it in a little guardless bird-and-trout knife. Because you're often gonna get a good bit of slime and blood onto the grip of such a knife, the finger ring has the virtue of helping prevent your hand slipping up onto the sharp bit.

Less my interest, but a little-finger ring is often included in smaller "tactical" knives too - similar reasons, but also to help with "knife retention." A hard jolt to your forearm/wrist can knock a weapon from your hand, except if it's fastened in there somehow. Of course, the ring also makes the knife into a handy lever for the other guy to apply pressure to your joints ... You'll see it frequently with karambits (little claw-shaped knives, held in a fist), sometimes with bumps and thorn-shaped bits to turn the outside edge of the ring into a nastier but still less-lethal striking surface. With karambits the ring also helps drawing the knife - worn in a hidden sheath as a backup weapon, with only the ring accessible.

I don't have much use for a karambit - they're fookin' effective and almost invisible weapons (punch beside someone or catch behind their knee with a 2-3" hooked blade hanging off the bottom of your fist), but lousy tools otherwise, IMO. Were I ever massively unfortunate enough to use a weapon in a self-defence situation, the police would raise deep questions about why I'd carried a karambit instead of, say, an Opinel. Or a screwdriver even.

Paul Pless
02-21-2017, 02:59 PM
Or a screwdriver even.or in paladin's case, a pencil. . . ;)

Dave Hadfield
02-21-2017, 03:15 PM
I reach for my SAK 20 times a day.

And it REALLY BUGS ME that since 911 I can't have it in my pocket when at work.

TomF
02-21-2017, 03:18 PM
or in paladin's case, a pencil. . . ;)Exactly. A robust, but entirely "non-weapon" kind of weapon ... that you've taken the time to train with a bit.

A sensei once had us do a karate kata empty-handed as usual, and then had us pick up any one of a number of everyday objects he'd brought along, and do the kata again while holding something. Just to see what the motion of the kata suggested. As I recall he brought a small hardcover book, a bottle, two umbrellas (one collapsible, one not). A backpack, and yeah, an aluminum bodied mechanical pencil.

Was very interesting seeing some lightbulbs go off overtop of people's heads. Any movement we train is just a movement; what you're learning is how to do it quickly, with good body dynamics and force, and without thinking. We've put names to those movements for convenience' sake, calling some "Punch," "Block to deflect a kick," "Block for a punch to the head" etc., but they're just general-purpose movements of limbs, torso, and body weight. A block to deflect a kick works just as well as a strike to the groin, or to an extended knee, or even as a throw. Put an object in your hand too, and a lot of doors open up.

Someday, I'm gonna be old enough and stiff enough to warrant carrying a cane. It's not gonna be a flimsy collapsible little POS either. In fact, it might have a heft and balance that's remarkably similar to a "jo," the quite short white oak staff used in the Japanese arts. :D

Peerie Maa
02-21-2017, 03:22 PM
Someday, I'm gonna be old enough and stiff enough to warrant carrying a cane. It's not gonna be a flimsy collapsible little POS either. In fact, it might have a heft and balance that's remarkably similar to a "jo," the quite short white oak staff used in the Japanese arts. :D

I still have, and used my fathers stick. It is more akin to a stout ash plant than a bentwood cane.
Somewhat like this
http://www.canesgalore.com/images/9008700.jpg

amish rob
02-21-2017, 03:34 PM
Exactly. A robust, but entirely "non-weapon" kind of weapon ... that you've taken the time to train with a bit.

A sensei once had us do a karate kata empty-handed as usual, and then had us pick up any one of a number of everyday objects he'd brought along, and do the kata again while holding something. Just to see what the motion of the kata suggested. As I recall he brought a small hardcover book, a bottle, two umbrellas (one collapsible, one not). A backpack, and yeah, an aluminum bodied mechanical pencil.

Was very interesting seeing some lightbulbs go off overtop of people's heads. Any movement we train is just a movement; what you're learning is how to do it quickly, with good body dynamics and force, and without thinking. We've put names to those movements for convenience' sake, calling some "Punch," "Block to deflect a kick," "Block for a punch to the head" etc., but they're just general-purpose movements of limbs, torso, and body weight. A block to deflect a kick works just as well as a strike to the groin, or to an extended knee, or even as a throw. Put an object in your hand too, and a lot of doors open up.

Someday, I'm gonna be old enough and stiff enough to warrant carrying a cane. It's not gonna be a flimsy collapsible little POS either. In fact, it might have a heft and balance that's remarkably similar to a "jo," the quite short white oak staff used in the Japanese arts. :D

Hey, ain't, Mr. Miyagi! I thought I was just painting the fence! :) Sorry. Could not resist, and I trust you understand I mean NO disrespect to the art of Karate.

I have come to believe more that "muscle memory" is actually fascial memory, the patterns are burned into our neural network. I think we have lots of little "body brains" connected to the main brain, and the mind is separate. Your fingers, when you play an instrument, for example, are surely not in direct contact with the thinking brain, after "mastery" is achieved, after the fascia has learned. They work via the little clump of "body brain" nerves that subcontract to control the hands.

Instict, or reflex is really the primitive, body based, animal mind operating. I think.

As to weapons. Yep. Use a chopstick or a pen cap on my kids all the time. Actually, in Wing Chun, there is an idea, bil jee, stabbing fingers, roughly. The fingers are the longest arm weapon, so the strengthening of the fingers into stiff, hard, stabbing weapons is part of the game.
I can still take down Oldest Son with one finger, though he is a few inches taller and almost 70 pounds heavier (and stronger than a two ton rat!). Using a pen, or even a disposable lighter, it is easy to incapacitate someone.

Then again, there is always the old roll of quarters...

Peace,
Robert

TomF
02-21-2017, 03:35 PM
There is some very good material around on how walking sticks were used for self defence in Europe in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries. Often held like one would hold a sabre in a "hanging guard," and generating the impact for a strike by rotating the stick either forehand or backhand down and through a full 360 degrees before cracking down onto your assailant from overhead.

Didn't take many strikes, with a stick like your father's, Nick.

amish rob
02-21-2017, 03:36 PM
I still have, and used my fathers stick. It is more akin to a stout ash plant than a bentwood cane.
Somewhat like this
http://www.canesgalore.com/images/9008700.jpg
That reminds me of a knobkerrie. Looks painful and comfy, at the same time, depending on the application. :)

Peace,
Robert
(still keep my cane in the corner, and I curse it every day with fresh venom :))

TomF
02-21-2017, 03:40 PM
My fingers aren't strong enough for that, Rob. What did your instructors recommend to strengthen them? In Japanese styles of karate, they're mostly devoted to increasingly ridiculous forms of finger pushups (which I can't do, beyond the first versions). Okinawan hardcore folks will tie together a bundle of bamboo, and thrust their fingers through. The tighter and closer the ties, they say, the harder it gets. And some will poke their hands into bowls of rice, then work up to sand, then small pebbles, then etc. As a musician guy, I never really wanted to screw around so much with my fingers, just on the off chance.

I'd be interested to hear more about fascia; some of karate guys who lived to be tough 80+ year old birds used to talk about stopping relying so much on muscle strength, instead on "ligament" or "tendon strength," and even "joint strength." I don't yet know what they meant ... but it sounds like you've thought about it some.

Shang
02-21-2017, 04:01 PM
I have a British military issue Gurkha kukri--looks like this one.
I found it in a curiosity shop in Chelsea.
It doesn't fit in one's pocket very well, but it's handy for lopping off heads.

http://gurkha-antiques.com/onewebmedia/DSC_0010-imp.jpg

TomF
02-21-2017, 04:03 PM
Mine looks a bit different - but it's really good for lopping quite a lot of things. Haven't tried it on heads (yet,) but it's part of my standard camping kit now, and is brilliant dealing with downed trees.

amish rob
02-21-2017, 04:19 PM
One of the fundamental of the Wing Chun punch is the snap. The power comes from the slight hyper extension of the elbow and the powerful snapping of the tendons and ligaments. My arms make an audible "pop" when I punch.

Really, though, my research into fascia came after I injured my back, the last time. I had to relearn how to run, and as I was doing so, I changed everything about my running. I'm tall, and have long legs, especially femurs, so I was always encouraged to stride out. I had problems for my whole life with my hips and IT bands.

After The Bed, as I call it, I had to relearn how to walk and run, and I did it all barefoot. I quickly learned that by landing mid foot, and simply absorbing the step and rebounding, I could travel at an easy pace without expending much energy.

Well. Then I went deep. Basically, there is a ton of evidence that we only survived because we can run down any animal alive, and we can do that because of a few things. We sweat to cool off. We have a stride that is independent of our breathing. And, we have this marvelous system of bands and levers that propels us with nearly zero effort.

I am a highly trained aerobic runner. I don't use sugar when I run, at all. I'd as soon drink my own pee as Gatorade. And, yes, I can turn a 3 hour marathon, so I ain't jogging. I do mean running, though, and not sprinting. I can run 50 consecutive 8 minute miles with very little intake. If it's cool, I could do it with a few cups of water and some handfuls of nuts and fruit.
Blah blah blah.
The point is, our fascia. The nerve bundles and powerful bands that connect the body. The legs are literally spring loaded lever. The foot compresses the Achilles, it pulls on the hammy, they stretch, then rebound. Obviously, that is a very simple view, but it is the way it works.

Lately, I have been crossing the line into "The Matrix". My friends and I, also athletes, have long investigated the idea of Qi, and the idea of harnessing said. It becomes a bit metaphysical and mimbo jumboey to some, but there really is no physical reason I cannot redirect energy with my mind, eh?

Ah, but there's the trick. I can't run unless I'm empty headed. Like fighting. Fighting was my escape because it allowed me to turn of my human. During a fight I was never right or wrong or good or bad, but became simply The Fight. And, I do that with running, and especially swimming. I, the Robert thing I claim to be, disappear, and my body simply "does". Those times make me think my body must have some part of the mind in it.

Oh, yeah. Knives, knives, knives. Gotta stay on topic, eh? :)

Peace,
Robert

Forgot to answer. Fingers folded, middle on top, pinky beneath, ring and index flanking, thumb between pinky and index. Make a little bird head, sort of. Now, hit stuff. Boards. The Wing Chun dummy. A pail of heated sand was a favorite.
The whole idea of the art is to defend and disengage. Sort of using long weapons to warn people not to get close. My default, left over from Wing Chun is part of form training. It is a series of overlapping punches directly down the centerline. I can still muster over 80 punches a minute for five or so minutes. My sifu called them "Chinese" push ups.
Oh, I can do push-ups on all finger tips, thumbs, thumb-index-middle, knuckles, and I can still clap doing diamonds.
Gyms are lame. :)

TomF
02-21-2017, 04:25 PM
Well, I've gotta run away for a bit, but you've certainly grabbed my interest, Rob. If you want to jot down a few more thoughts about fascia somewhere, here, in another thread or over pm, I'd be very interested. I've done a fair bit of lifting stuff over the years, and learned to use a rebound reflex to get up out of the hole in a heavy squat ... but this is quite a lot further than I've thought. Not least, I think, because I've always had fairly tense muscles, and relaxing them to get the spring you talk about is just terrifically difficult for my brain to figure out. Wastes a whole lot of energy, and screws up lots of things (karate, music, etc.) too, but there you are.

t.

amish rob
02-21-2017, 04:27 PM
I have a British military issue Gurkha kukri--looks like this one.
I found it in a curiosity shop in Chelsea.
It doesn't fit in one's pocket very well, but it's handy for lopping off heads.

http://gurkha-antiques.com/onewebmedia/DSC_0010-imp.jpg
That is Oldest Son's dream knife. He finds great beauty in the design, as do I.

Peace,
Robert

robm
02-21-2017, 04:40 PM
Dave wrote:

I reach for my SAK 20 times a day.

And it REALLY BUGS ME that since 911 I can't have it in my pocket when at work.

Do you still have a fireaxe in the cockpit?

And wasn't there a move afoot to permit such small blades aboard aircraft a few years ago?


If allowed, I too would continue to carry my SAK wherever and whenever.

On occasion., I might pack a sheath knife, but it would be on the way to or from or during a camping trip. Usually, they stay in the drybag, not on my person. Small, old Solingen or Sheffield-made knives, or a Mora. I do have a Buck 119, useful for knocking oysters off rocks and killing fish, but really more show than go.

I own many knives, but no weapons. If I had to stick somebody with something, it is more likely to be a Bic pen than one of my knives. There doesn't seem to be any problem carrying them aboard aircraft, either.

amish rob
02-21-2017, 04:42 PM
Well, I've gotta run away for a bit, but you've certainly grabbed my interest, Rob. If you want to jot down a few more thoughts about fascia somewhere, here, in another thread or over pm, I'd be very interested. I've done a fair bit of lifting stuff over the years, and learned to use a rebound reflex to get up out of the hole in a heavy squat ... but this is quite a lot further than I've thought. Not least, I think, because I've always had fairly tense muscles, and relaxing them to get the spring you talk about is just terrifically difficult for my brain to figure out. Wastes a whole lot of energy, and screws up lots of things (karate, music, etc.) too, but there you are.

t.
Sure enough.
I'll fire you a pm later on. I gotta play grown up for a bit my own self. :)

Peace,
Robert

Donn
02-21-2017, 05:06 PM
Jim Mahan's drawknife. Lethal!

Phil Y
02-21-2017, 05:06 PM
Just a smart phone is fine for me, and I prefer not to have that in my pocket. I just leave it nearby most of the time. I hate carrying crap in my pockets.

Gerarddm
02-21-2017, 05:43 PM
If I had to stick somebody with something, it is more likely to be a Bic pen than one of my knives

Reminds me of that line from John Wick: " I saw him kill three guys in a bar once with a pencil. A pencil! "

LeeG
02-21-2017, 05:50 PM
The larger Swiss army pocket knife with one blade, bottle opener/screwdriver, can opener/small screwdriver, corkscrew and awl. Looks like they've changed the style of it but can get more stuff out of a jar and the longer blade is a more useful scraping tool or knife for cutting food

Shang
02-21-2017, 06:42 PM
That is Oldest Son's dream knife. He finds great beauty in the design, as do I.

Peace,
Robert

When we were making films in India our work took us to Mussoorie, which is Gurkha country. I wanted to buy a kukri, so I asked around. The people were kind and good humored, but it was obvious that they found me ridiculous. They explained that kukris were family heirlooms and weren't for sale.
Much later, in London, I found two or three but they were seriously bunged up. So I bought the one I found in Chelsea.
In the meantime I saw dozens and dozens of fake tourist kukris--they were made of some kind of shiny metal probably amalgamated with aluminum beer cans. Don't buy these.

TomF
02-21-2017, 06:59 PM
Antique kukris are sold by Atlanta Cutlery (http://www.atlantacutlery.com/c-88-antique-militaria.aspx), from a stock they somehow came into from the Royal Nepalese Army. Some of these have all the bits, some are knives without scabbards, some are just blades. All date from the late 19th Century, it seems. If I didn't already own one ... well, 2 ...

New kukris (or khukuris, depending on your taste in spelling) can be got from a few reputable suppliers; mine is the 16 1/2" model here, from Himalayan Imports (http://yhst-7333098713883.stores.yahoo.net/wwii.html). That firm works with craftspeople in Nepal who still forge by hand, over charcoal fires even, and have made an incredible name in the business for selling good products while also paying their staff what they ought to be paid. It's owned/run by Yangdu Martino, a Nepalese woman who is the widow of the founder ... an American peace corps guy who discovered that what the poor folk in Nepal mostly needed... was work. Was a pathway to sell the extraordinary things they made.

HI has a page on BladeForums that discusses their stuff, and where they post "deals of the day" which are typically blems or one-offs. I got my two (well 3 ... but I gave one away) that way, looking for user knives which wouldn't be inconvenienced by a small blemish. They have a bewildering number of models, reflecting tastes and regional style differences throughout Nepal. The model I use the most is the one which was recommended to me by the company's founder ... he'd found that for a user blade for camping and general wood-cutting purposes, that size and model hit a sweet spot. Having worked with a few of them, different sizes and shapes, I concluded that Bill Martino was spot on.

johnw
02-21-2017, 07:09 PM
I would continue to carry the knife I now carry, a small pen knife. Not that I write with a quill, but it's minimal size and useful for things like opening boxes or cutting some line to length.

Paul Pless
02-21-2017, 07:32 PM
Cool thread. These knife threads often are though.

I carry one of these for a while now, cost about a hundred bucks, made in Pennsylvania

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/wp-content/uploads/FnF_open_IMG_0713.jpg

I have a Ka-Bar in my camping gear. I have no idea its age, provenance, who made it, if its actually a GI knife or what. I was given it by my mom and dad when I was 13 along with a bunch of other camping gear when I became very active in boy scouts and camping. Its heavy, I don't ever wear on my belt. Its a hell of knife though.

I also have a five inch bladed Puukko that is not much to look at it, but I use it musch more than the Ka-Bar when camping and fishing. Its probably about a $150 knife.

I have a Buck skinning knife but I never use it. The last deer I gutted was with a Gerber folder.

I like looking at custom made knives, both folders and fixed blade. I like a wide variety of styles and materials, including the super high end Damascus knives. I guess if I were in the market for another knife today, based on aesthetics and some functionality would be a fixed Tanto with polished micarta handles - simple, clean, elegant.

TomF
02-21-2017, 08:04 PM
That "Farm and Field" is a sweet piece of steel. Might have to look into that ...

Paul Pless
02-21-2017, 08:10 PM
http://c745.r45.cf2.rackcdn.com/img/2009/Farm-Field-Lockback-Pocket-Knife.jpg

TomF
02-21-2017, 08:13 PM
hmmm. white or green ...

amish rob
02-21-2017, 08:13 PM
http://c745.r45.cf2.rackcdn.com/img/2009/Farm-Field-Lockback-Pocket-Knife.jpg
Ooh. That's about right, eh? Me likey!

Peace,
Robert

wizbang 13
02-21-2017, 09:18 PM
I am happy with the $20 "Milwaukee" snap knife from Home Depot. Those expensive Kershaw knives do not float any better.

TomF
02-21-2017, 10:10 PM
Paul, is that handle the material that Great Eastern Cutlery calls "nifebrite?" A glow in the dark handle? How is that - a cool thing, or as weird as it sounds at first hearing?

Seems that the manufacturer doesn't have enough production to easily meet demand. Damn.

PeterSibley
02-21-2017, 10:17 PM
The one I have now, Dad gave it to me when I was 15, pretty much identical to the Google image but a plainer sheath.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/ef/1f/83/ef1f832303b569a22352d2ee779f27a7.jpg

A 3 1/2'' blade Mora. A good bit of steel.

Shang
02-21-2017, 10:29 PM
A Knife Story (Which I may have told in the past) :

My shooting, caving, canoe buddy, "Jerry the Bear" returned from a buying trip to Italy. Jerry ran a business selling rapid-fire weapons accessories. If you are serious about things that go bang rapidly you probably know that "Jerry" isn't his name. Sometimes Jerry branched out into other life-and-limb risking toys.
Back in town Jerry telephoned me: "How'd the trip go?" I asked.
"Pretty good," Jerry answered, "By the way, if you get a package from Italy give me a call...but don't open it."
Sure enough, a day or two later the postman delivered a brown paper package addressed to:

"Dr. Shang, DDS = Dental Instruments."

Against Jerry's instructions, I opened the package.
Two dozen beautifully made Italian switch-blade knives fell out on my table.

This could be a problem since according to the Feds, switchblade knives are illegal under USC Chapter 29. "The law allows a person to possess and/or carry a switchblade on or about his person only if the blade is less than three inches long and the person has only one arm."

I considered the matter: If a Federal Officer happened to drop into my kitchen at that moment I could go up the river for a long time.
On the other hand, what if I was drawn into a knife fight with a small person with only one arm?

While I thought this over I sorted through the knives and picked out a particularly nice one. Then I called Jerry to let him know that his dental instruments had arrived, but that there appeared to be a little shrinkage...

Jimmy W
02-21-2017, 11:10 PM
My Kershaw Leek in post 7 has what Kershaw calls SpeedSafe assisted opening. You can start it opening with a push on the thumb stud or a pull on the flipper and it finishes opening by itself. It is about as fast as a switchblade. It has a safety on it, but I keep a piece of tape on the safety to keep it from engaging. So far, it has never accidentally opened.

wizbang 13
02-22-2017, 04:35 AM
I have a couple of Leeks too. I believe it is their best selling knife. It is so flat, I have a tough time holding it,and it is slow to open, because of the wee safety slide thing. (2 step process). It costs more than $23.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
02-22-2017, 09:59 AM
To be honest, I'd carry a Leatherman Wave.

It's actually illegal in the UK as the blade is over three inches and it can be fixed in a rigid position, but the screwdrivers and scissors are really useful!

David G
02-22-2017, 10:17 AM
Datum: my Kershaw #1960 cost me just over $20. But it was, admittedly, on sale. Probably $30 - 40 new.

Paul Pless
02-22-2017, 10:19 AM
Paul, is that handle the material that Great Eastern Cutlery calls "nifebrite?" A glow in the dark handle? How is that - a cool thing, or as weird as it sounds at first hearing?

Seems that the manufacturer doesn't have enough production to easily meet demand. Damn.i don't ever notice it really 'glowing'

David G
02-22-2017, 10:29 AM
i don't ever notice it really 'glowing'

Maybe you need to adjust your 'medication'?? <G>

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
02-22-2017, 11:45 AM
To be honest, I'd carry a Leatherman Wave.

It's actually illegal in the UK as the blade is over three inches and it can be fixed in a rigid position, but the screwdrivers and scissors are really useful!

I found the Wave to be excessively big due to 4 full length blades (straight knife, serrated knife, saw, file). But if you wanna lug it around, be my guest. I think their best deal in recent years on a bigger tool is the Wingman, has the essentials plus scissors, the heavier plier jaws, and when it first came out, was $30. I had some sorta retail discount coupon, can't remember exactly, but it enabled me to get one for $20. In fact the MSRP was so low, I suspected it was made in China (especially since it didn't say USA on it like past Leatherman tools), I asked them about that, they responded that some parts are outsourced based on where they can best be made, but that majority of the tool is made in USA.

David G
02-22-2017, 11:45 AM
I rather like the little CRKT Pazoda I keep in the truck center console. If my work/play was a little less rigorous, it's maybe what I'd carry in my pocket. I just ordered 3 of them as gifts for my two boys, and the impending d-i-law. The new grandson is about 6 months away from arrival... so I figured it was maybe a bit premature to order one for him.

https://static.bhphoto.com/images/images500x500/crkt_6470_pazoda_2_every_day_1436189724000_1162297 .jpg

Canoez
02-22-2017, 11:49 AM
To be honest, I'd carry a Leatherman Wave.

It's actually illegal in the UK as the blade is over three inches and it can be fixed in a rigid position, but the screwdrivers and scissors are really useful!

Does that apply to all pocket knives? I just got a new Swiza brand "Swiss Army Knife" where the main blade locks into position. If that's the case, I ought to leave it at home if traveling.

TomF
02-22-2017, 11:51 AM
i don't ever notice it really 'glowing'So long as your eyesight's still good, that's a "plus." :D Website claims it makes the knife harder to misplace ... also a good thing.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
02-22-2017, 11:53 AM
I sorta like the design curves of the Sharpfinger, and sorta don't. Were I to be doing a fair bit of hunting, though, the curve might prove brilliant for skinning.

One thing I've wondered about, actually, is there's a guy on Ebay who's allegedly selling off forged but un-ground blanks of antique Sabatier professional kitchen knives. I've considered getting a 3 1/2" or 4" blade from him, and completing it to be a small belt knife. If one left the ground knife maybe 25% beefier than a kitchen knife of the same size, you'd be starting with a very well proven Chef's knife shape in a size that I use a lot in the kitchen.

Skinning is exactly what the Sharpfinger is designed for.

And yes, a 3-1/2" forged kitchen paring knife is a decent deal on a utility knife, at least if not a name brand. You can get a cheaper one for less than $10, it's not going to be made in USA or Germany but China, but will hold a decent edge. I had to reshape the edge on mine away from cleaver-blunt toward a fine Japanese style edge. Steeling over time seems to have improved the edge I think, perhaps a little work hardening. I haven't had to stone it in years.

Stuff on ebay, buyer beware. Lots of fraud. One company constantly has their patented cargo lifting straps copied and sold cheap.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
02-22-2017, 11:56 AM
Does that apply to all pocket knives? I just got a new Swiza brand "Swiss Army Knife" where the main blade locks into position. If that's the case, I ought to leave it at home if traveling.

Yes.

Or, if flying, pack it in your checked baggage, and don't carry it in public in the UK.

Canoez
02-22-2017, 12:05 PM
Yes.

Or, if flying, pack it in your checked baggage, and don't carry it in public in the UK.

Typically pack my knife in checked luggage. I'll just switch it out for my other Victorinox version that doesn't have a locking blade as is my usual plan. Thanks for that little bit of info.

Knew longer blades were an issue - an American in line at the London Eye was arrested for carrying a pocket knife with a 3-1/2" blade or the like. Nothing that dangerous or unusual, just in excess of the law and found at security check.

Shang
02-22-2017, 12:09 PM
I was preparing to board an airliner in Kansas City when the bozo at the gate confiscated my nail clippers and nail file. I said that it would be better if he let me keep them.
"Why?" he asked.
"Because without them I might be able to scratch your eyes out!"

TomF
02-22-2017, 12:15 PM
Saw a vid from a self defence guy I follow about using a "kubotan." What amounts to a 6-7" long stick, maybe half an inch in diameter. The guy's British, and he observed that in the UK you can train with a kubotan, but you can't walk around day-to-day carrying one - because it was designed to be a weapon. Designed to amplify force, and cause personal harm when used as intended. In other parts of the world, people put a kubotan on their key-chain, but not in the UK.

So he did part of the training video with a kubotan ... and part of it holding a felt tipped marker. Just as effective, less illegal.

amish rob
02-22-2017, 12:39 PM
Saw a vid from a self defence guy I follow about using a "kubotan." What amounts to a 6-7" long stick, maybe half an inch in diameter. The guy's British, and he observed that in the UK you can train with a kubotan, but you can't walk around day-to-day carrying one - because it was designed to be a weapon. Designed to amplify force, and cause personal harm when used as intended. In other parts of the world, people put a kubotan on their key-chain, but not in the UK.

So he did part of the training video with a kubotan ... and part of it holding a felt tipped marker. Just as effective, less illegal.

Carried one for years. On my keys. Marvelous little things if you know pressure points and joint manipulation.
I spaced the PM. Fire off one in a few. :)

Peace,
Robert

Chris Smith porter maine
02-22-2017, 07:38 PM
A leathermam on my belt, opinel in the lunchbox, and a lapin puukko in each vehicle, lapin puukko. Are well made handmade knives for short money I have 3, the camping knife will just do a deer altho a larger one is much better for that.

http://www.lapinpuukko.fi/en/products/outdoorknives/

Dumah
02-23-2017, 12:11 AM
Leatherman Wave and Minimag on right hip, in the big truck I carried a Russel. Unfortunately lost years ago.

Dumah

Stiletto
03-05-2017, 09:18 PM
Tried this, it works well, even if you only have a car!;)


https://youtu.be/zleVA9yxdm8

skuthorp
03-05-2017, 10:17 PM
Carrying knives of any sort are illegal here unless you are working and can say it is part of your essential kit. It's a bit ridiculous as box cutters are ubiquitous and If I looked in either of our cars there'd be at least one in each. Then there's my pruning knife which travels, my boat Weatherman which is in my kit and often in the car, t2 scalpels and blades in my 1st aid kit.
Not to mention various screwdrivers, chisels, draw knives etc. etc.

Old Dryfoot
03-05-2017, 11:34 PM
Tried this, it works well, even if you only have a car!;)


An old kitchen trick is to flip over a rarebit dish, they have a nice flat, unglazed bottom.

Jimmy W
03-06-2017, 12:05 AM
At work, I would just use the side of a cardboard box as I would a leather strop. It works very well.

paulf
03-06-2017, 12:45 AM
This, and a Swiss army tool box. I used to carry one I made, lost it, don't want to do that again. These are 11 or 12 bucks, the SAK is 35.
https://morakniv.se/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/companion-mg-carbon.png

https://assets.victorinox.com/mam/celum/celum_assets/6cc/34c/8849449713694_celum_74896_320Wx280H.jpg?1

PeterSibley
03-06-2017, 01:28 AM
This what I DO carry ....an excellent little knife that fits in my fob pocket.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71b9yjFvgnL._SX355_.jpg

RFNK
03-06-2017, 02:23 AM
Just a smart phone is fine for me, and I prefer not to have that in my pocket. I just leave it nearby most of the time. I hate carrying crap in my pockets.

Oh come on, Phil! How can you kill people with a smart phone?

Rick

RFNK
03-06-2017, 02:28 AM
This what I DO carry ....an excellent little knife that fits in my fob pocket.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71b9yjFvgnL._SX355_.jpg

A good little knife like that is very useful but I'd rather have one with a snub point or flat point. I find sharp points pretty vulnerable and dangerous.

I like the Leatherman tool. I only use the knife and the pliers most of the time though, but having those two tools available is very useful. On the boat, the knife has to be serrated,for cutting line quickly.

Rick

PeterSibley
03-06-2017, 02:39 AM
Yes,a boat knife is on the list but the Spyderco Ladybug is a neat little thing and is available with a serrated blade.
Google image.

https://www.chaletessentials.com.au/images/fullsize/spyderco-ladybug-3-salt-yellow-h1-serrated-blade-lyls3-70c.c40.jpg

RFNK
03-06-2017, 02:49 AM
But still with that sharp point! Why do you need a stabbing point on a serrated knife? I just bought a neat little Wichard knife for the boat. It has a point but not a very sharp one, it has a shackle key blade too and it glows in the dark. I'm hoping it'll be pretty good.

Rick

RFNK
03-06-2017, 02:51 AM
By the way, Peter, how are you posting those pictures? Do you upload them into Photobucket or something and then paste them from there or is there a quicker way?

Rick

PeterSibley
03-06-2017, 02:54 AM
Take 10mm off the nose with a grinder ! It's still an excellent bit of steel, the best stainless I've ever used. It actually holds an edge.

PeterSibley
03-06-2017, 02:55 AM
By the way, Peter, how are you posting those pictures? Do you upload them into Photobucket or something and then paste them from there or is there a quicker way?

Rick

Google Chrome, Copy image , Paste. I only need to use Photobucket for pictures from my files.

RFNK
03-06-2017, 03:48 AM
Thanks. Sadly, it doesn't work for me on this Apple computer using Chrome. Hmmm ...

Rick

oznabrag
03-06-2017, 09:17 AM
Thanks. Sadly, it doesn't work for me on this Apple computer using Chrome. Hmmm ...

Rick

Works for me on my Apple using Firefox.

Right-click the image, select 'copy image', go to your post, right-click 'paste', et voila!

Sometimes the address of the image exceeds 10,000 characters, and the WBF won't post it, but that's another matter.

Breakaway
03-06-2017, 09:20 AM
Thanks. Sadly, it doesn't work for me on this Apple computer using Chrome. Hmmm ...

Rick

For me, using a Mac with either Chrome or Firefox, I can't do it from the Google images search page. I have to click on the image in Google and then click on the box that says, "View Image."

From there, I can copy and paste or drag and drop.

Kevin

oznabrag
03-06-2017, 09:22 AM
Well, the mysteries keep piling up, eh?

I wonder if the key to this puzzle lies with the ISP?

David G
03-06-2017, 10:31 AM
A good little knife like that is very useful but I'd rather have one with a snub point or flat point. I find sharp points pretty vulnerable and dangerous.

I like the Leatherman tool. I only use the knife and the pliers most of the time though, but having those two tools available is very useful. On the boat, the knife has to be serrated,for cutting line quickly.

Rick

You're right - that needley point is a hazard. I've nicked myself a few times with mine. It's only happened a few times, though, and I often find the point handy... so I'll stick with it.

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
03-08-2017, 10:49 AM
This, and a Swiss army tool box.... the SAK is 35.


https://assets.victorinox.com/mam/celum/celum_assets/6cc/34c/8849449713694_celum_74896_320Wx280H.jpg?1

Not in Switzerland. :) Actually, the price of them has risen little in 25 years, but they were less than half over there, I came back with a couple dozen in red, black, a couple fine wood handles, plus a bag full of the eyeglass screwdrivers that screw into the corkscrew, paid the small duty on whatever was over the free limit, and gave them all out to friends. The SA golf knife with golf tools went over well with my golf-playing customers. :)

Somewhere in storage I have several dozen of the smallest SAK, and a couple larger ones that I bought in more recent years; I used to trek down to the government sales place where they sold, among other things, items confiscated by TSA. There would be a half-dozen locals lined up in front of me to scour the bins, they usually got all the nice stuff like Leatherman tools, but I was able to find a larger one of those for a friend ($3 I think), and a smaller PS4 for me (which is my main carry these days), about 20 Micras @$1.50 or $2, and the small SAKs with one tiny blade, a nail file, scissors, tweezers, and toothpick at the same price. A couple with pen or light. Several dozen nice metal folding corkscrews like sommeliers carry. In my spare time I would bring those back to like knew on a polishing wheel or scotchbrite for the Micras or corkscrews. I'd make up emergency kits for people with a Sucrets or Altoids tin box, and inside a small SAK or micra, disposable butane lighter, magnesium firestarter block ($1.50 on sale at Harbor Freight I think), some 200 lb dacron line, etc. But everything is in storage right now, no workshop.

For my dire emergency boat knife, I like the serrated blade because it does cut line lightening fast and can saw through a kayak hull for a rescue, but in the everyday I hate serrated blades because they take so much more time to sharpen, and just aren't necessary. A well sharpened standard blade works well, even for line, in fact most of the time you wouldn't want to use a serrated blade because it frazzles the end, making it harder to get a good melt.

paulf
03-08-2017, 12:07 PM
Not in Switzerland. :) Actually, the price of them has risen little in 25 years, but they were less than half over there, I came back with a couple dozen in red, black, a couple fine wood handles, plus a bag full of the eyeglass screwdrivers that screw into the corkscrew, paid the small duty on whatever was over the free limit, and gave them all out to friends. The SA golf knife with golf tools went over well with my golf-playing customers. :)

Somewhere in storage I have several dozen of the smallest SAK, and a couple larger ones that I bought in more recent years; I used to trek down to the government sales place where they sold, among other things, items confiscated by TSA. There would be a half-dozen locals lined up in front of me to scour the bins, they usually got all the nice stuff like Leatherman tools, but I was able to find a larger one of those for a friend ($3 I think), and a smaller PS4 for me (which is my main carry these days), about 20 Micras @$1.50 or $2, and the small SAKs with one tiny blade, a nail file, scissors, tweezers, and toothpick at the same price. A couple with pen or light. Several dozen nice metal folding corkscrews like sommeliers carry. In my spare time I would bring those back to like knew on a polishing wheel or scotchbrite for the Micras or corkscrews. I'd make up emergency kits for people with a Sucrets or Altoids tin box, and inside a small SAK or micra, disposable butane lighter, magnesium firestarter block ($1.50 on sale at Harbor Freight I think), some 200 lb dacron line, etc. But everything is in storage right now, no workshop.

For my dire emergency boat knife, I like the serrated blade because it does cut line lightening fast and can saw through a kayak hull for a rescue, but in the everyday I hate serrated blades because they take so much more time to sharpen, and just aren't necessary. A well sharpened standard blade works well, even for line, in fact most of the time you wouldn't want to use a serrated blade because it frazzles the end, making it harder to get a good melt.

Where I anchor my boat there is a small artificial reef made entirely of my deep six'd SAK's, some of them with perfectly good lanyards attached.

David G
03-08-2017, 12:31 PM
Where I anchor my boat there is a small artificial reef made entirely of my deep six'd SAK's, some of them with perfectly good lanyards attached.

I've sent a few knives swimming - but not one since I took to using a lanyard. Sometimes - to get the reach I need - I have to unclip the lanyard from my belt loop. But that brief delay just serves to remind me to Be Careful.

robm
03-08-2017, 01:07 PM
I have been wearing knives with lanyards since I was 16. I only ever lost one, the first, as it wasn't tied on at the time. We were running the Squamish River in a craft made of truck inner tubes and bush poles, which needed some serious body-English to get through a shallow spot, and the knife fell from where I had secured it to the "vessel" in a plastic bag. Since then, they have all been stolen from my checked luggage while being inspected at airports. I think I am up to 4 lost this way.

I find the ideal length for a lanyard is the same as my inseam. This seems to work for others, too. When secured to a belt loop, an open SAK can be dropped without hitting the ground or any body part, and can be used at a height up to about eye level with the arm straight out in front. Any higher, it has to be taken off the belt loop. An advantage is the knife can be pulled from the pocket and opened one handed, using the lanyard. Other knives can be opened one handed, but they are not legal to carry in some parts of the world.

gilberj
03-08-2017, 01:16 PM
I carry a Swiss Army Knife...a larger model with 3" locking blade, saw, screw drivers (small and large slot) cork screw and poker. I loose knives about every 5 or 6 years, one way or another.

RFNK
03-08-2017, 07:33 PM
Where I anchor my boat there is a small artificial reef made entirely of my deep six'd SAK's, some of them with perfectly good lanyards attached.

:) Under my boat there's also a small treasure chest but, unfortunately, secured by soft mud.

Rick

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
03-08-2017, 08:34 PM
Where I anchor my boat there is a small artificial reef made entirely of my deep six'd SAK's, some of them with perfectly good lanyards attached.

Next time someone around there gets mugged by a geoduck with a SAK, we'll know why.

Jimmy W
03-08-2017, 10:05 PM
I just used the very sharp point on my Kershaw Leek to remove another splinter. I like having it there.