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Jim Bow
02-19-2017, 04:19 PM
Can an American, who wishes his country were more like Canada, call himself a Canadian-American?

outofthenorm
02-19-2017, 04:33 PM
It's OK with me.

Peerie Maa
02-19-2017, 04:34 PM
What is wrong with North American? When it comes down to it you are all Americans.

Ron Williamson
02-19-2017, 04:47 PM
There's a reason that most of us,while sympathetic to their plight,and despite geography,chose not to call ourselves Americans.
R

Dan McCosh
02-19-2017, 04:52 PM
Those of us with roots in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, use the term "American".

CWSmith
02-19-2017, 05:14 PM
I spent a week in Wolfville, Nova Scotia some years ago and I like it very much. It's exceptional.

Chip-skiff
02-19-2017, 05:19 PM
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/q9-7onB9RAmZeoc5D3dRCYmVVN3H5nj_TVopYTMQeY9l8rB4Gb18c 7fWupXsoEJvjGWSSRrIw8IJeeEVhZ9OAjCTw9QNlfln6wX7LgX 8B0r_hJjq5z9wUBM4TJNSTLRnZGsw4pXZLhqgqXUG8bhkdZhxy 6WyhVeDh1AfAgZQ6cRTdHaLyVrmhBg9noMZQdmIBp_DgIfYpuV haHV97If8NzSDgo8AHKZzalEXbdH6d7vTmohF1tHgWvf2WVb7T mYDWkxxoHDvvO6RqWl38-pCD1CheSknLZHI0ZsvHa39AjRe7lyMaUjrd6_qZhctTS0GYD4I o5XOp7nrGFQ48y6G2H_5ljiolZjKtlLHXooPQPpqCfJB6zer3I GIvxb1KzDjYp6CesKwQrhQJwuXpeA-GZQX79npjlJwLvR40Q03gAvameYXi6jYI4HaFmu88XJsYskJfj AWicjXSL76-HknXbqupcNjjXsGWoe_cXSaDXV5r2ijZnoICLrcRKukaIEChtz XoleQ1-mpnoPxsyxFBqc4_jk6MZdF_BQTx8AvKcLg4QMAP7r5sVfhVLIN KMIvFXZVAJAoBJGg-AMI7Gewfu4i-l3fgu1iiq3YmcSx26olCUUa=w482-h407-no

Bob (oh, THAT Bob)
02-19-2017, 06:13 PM
To paraphrase George H.W. Bush (The Elder), Canada is "a kinder and gentler America".

Jim Bow
02-19-2017, 07:24 PM
What is wrong with North American? When it comes down to it you are all Americans.
We had the "American" talk with a group in Costa Rica. One of the participants came up with "Persona de Doodle Dandy".

Jim Bow
02-19-2017, 08:33 PM
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/75/1st_Special_Service_Force.patch.jpg

B_B
02-19-2017, 09:19 PM
Those of us with roots in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, use the term "American".
No. We don't. You might. We don't.

Dan McCosh
02-19-2017, 09:39 PM
No. We don't. You might. We don't. The ambivalent "we".

B_B
02-19-2017, 09:49 PM
http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/misc/quote_icon.pngOriginally Posted by Dan McCoshhttp://forum.woodenboat.com/images/buttons/viewpost-right.png
(http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?p=5164858#post5164858)Those of us with roots in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, use the term "American".http://forum.woodenboat.com/images/misc/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by B_Bhttp://forum.woodenboat.com/images/buttons/viewpost-right.png
(http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?p=5165052#post5165052)No. We don't. You might. We don't.The ambivalent "we".
Non "Americans" - I've never heard a Canadian nor a Mexican, nor anyone from South or Central America for that matter, refer to themselves as "Americans" colloquially. Technically yes, as in "sure, we're all 'Americans' but why can't America give a sh!t about anything or anyone but themselves?".
"American" is a term pretty exclusively reserved for citizens of the United States of America, sometimes proudly, sometimes pejoratively.

Dan McCosh
02-19-2017, 09:56 PM
Non "Americans" - I've never heard a Canadian nor a Mexican, nor anyone from South or Central America for that matter, refer to themselves as "Americans" colloquially. Technically yes, as in "sure, we're all 'Americans' but why can't America give a sh!t about anything or anyone but themselves?".
"American" is a term pretty exclusively reserved for citizens of the United States of America, sometimes proudly, sometimes pejoratively. Quite perceptive. Residents of France usually call themselves French as well.

Steve McMahon
02-19-2017, 09:58 PM
Can an American, who wishes his country were more like Canada, call himself a Canadian-American?

No, that just wouldn't be right.
You can always immigrate if you qualify and can pass the tests.

LeeG
02-19-2017, 10:27 PM
Bobbys, you've gone full retard again.

Dumah
02-19-2017, 10:57 PM
Again??? :confused::confused: More like still:d

Dumah

B_B
02-19-2017, 10:59 PM
Quite perceptive. Residents of France usually call themselves French as well.
So why would Dan McCosh say "Those of us with roots in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, use the term "American"?
Many of "us" with roots in Canada and Mexico, don't refer to ourselves as "American" therefore; No. We don't.

Steve McMahon
02-19-2017, 11:13 PM
So why would Dan McCosh say "Those of us with roots in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, use the term "American"?
Many of "us" with roots in Canada and Mexico, don't refer to ourselves as "American" therefore; No. We don't.

You got me stumped. I've never heard a Canadian refer to themselves as "American". I have however been mistaken as an American in Europe. Usually got a big grin and a "so sorry" when I emphatically replied that I was a Canadian, not an American. (nothing against Americans, just not my thing)

Landrith
02-19-2017, 11:57 PM
In the words of Che Guevara from the Motorcycle Diaries, we are all Americans https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypmu86_sKpU I was a little taken back this week when watching a Vice documentary about the continuing bad conditions for Aboriginal peoples in Canada though and the discriminatory prejudice that has cast current native citizens a bad future....

TomF
02-20-2017, 06:35 AM
When libs travel they wear canadian maple leafs , they are ashamed of being americans..

they run through airports kicking soccer balls singing Celine Dione show tunes..
Never Celine. I'd do Nickleback before that. A guy must have some standards.

outofthenorm
02-20-2017, 08:18 AM
.

I thought it was pretty funny myself

Shows just how wrong a person can be.

Steve McMahon
02-20-2017, 08:43 AM
In the words of Che Guevara from the Motorcycle Diaries, we are all Americans https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypmu86_sKpU I was a little taken back this week when watching a Vice documentary about the continuing bad conditions for Aboriginal peoples in Canada though and the discriminatory prejudice that has cast current native citizens a bad future....

We are still struggling with the First Nations issues we have created. Some positive progress has been made in some area's, but we still have a long way to go.

TomF
02-20-2017, 09:42 AM
I have some mixed feelings about First Nations issues.

For instance, it's a fine thing IMO for a person to choose to live in a very remote area, if they wish. An enormous amount to be said for being far away from millions of people and the pollution they create, and instead living in much closer contact with the natural world. If there are traditional cultural practices and history associated with living in a particular place and etc., even more so.

That said, when a person chooses to live a massive distance away from the negative features of modern civilization ... they've also chosen to live a massive distance away from its physical benefits. You'll have a much tougher time going to a Radiohead concert, or seeing an international touring exhibition on dinosaurs found in China. You'll have a much tougher time getting smashed to pieces in a 25 car pileup on an icy highway ... but also a much tougher time getting to a trauma center if you tangle with a bear or a falling tree. Less likely that there are economies of scale in bringing in really high-tech water treatment plants, or that there's a lot of redundancy that you can create in the skill sets needed to keep them in absolute top form. In fact, by choosing to live in the wilderness, one might reasonably be choosing to live with the same risks/benefits that wilderness livers have always faced. Including sometimes bad water.

These are choices; choices bring actual fallouts in terms of the resources one can reasonably expect to have at hand as you live your life. If you want a different mix of resources, getting them could reasonably require you to make a different choice.

This is not in any way intended to delegitimate people's experience of racism or abuse etc. But it is intended to re-introduce the idea that we are agents in our own lives in more respects than it is sometimes comfortable to acknowledge. If I choose to live in remote Labrador, I can expect that there will be lots more brilliantly fresh trout, and lots less cheap pineapple and winter lettuce. That's true whatever my own ethnic background. And it's not a Toronto or Halifax dweller's responsibility to subsidize me getting Romaine lettuce in January at the same price that it goes for in Toronto's supermarkets ... any more than it's a Labrador dweller's responsibility to subsidize the price of wild-caught speckled trout for Southern dwellers.

Similarly, tiny settlements and big cities have very different social dynamics - and not all of the characteristics of small are better. One abusive SOB can affect a much bigger proportion of the gene pool; a place where there are only a dozen adolescents probably won't have an enormous amount of variety as those kids look for someone to pair off with. That's not any outsider's historic oppression coming into play; it was as true in the centuries before Europeans came along with flags, guns, and a sense of superiority.

goodbasil
02-20-2017, 09:45 AM
Identified as Amercian-Canadian?
Not if his name is Trump.

bob winter
02-20-2017, 09:59 AM
I have some mixed feelings about First Nations issues.

For instance, it's a fine thing IMO for a person to choose to live in a very remote area, if they wish. An enormous amount to be said for being far away from millions of people and the pollution they create, and instead living in much closer contact with the natural world. If there are traditional cultural practices and history associated with living in a particular place and etc., even more so.

That said, when a person chooses to live a massive distance away from the negative features of modern civilization ... they've also chosen to live a massive distance away from its physical benefits. You'll have a much tougher time going to a Radiohead concert, or seeing an international touring exhibition on dinosaurs found in China. You'll have a much tougher time getting smashed to pieces in a 25 car pileup on an icy highway ... but also a much tougher time getting to a trauma center if you tangle with a bear or a falling tree. Less likely that there are economies of scale in bringing in really high-tech water treatment plants, or that there's a lot of redundancy that you can create in the skill sets needed to keep them in absolute top form. In fact, by choosing to live in the wilderness, one might reasonably be choosing to live with the same risks/benefits that wilderness livers have always faced. Including sometimes bad water.

These are choices; choices bring actual fallouts in terms of the resources one can reasonably expect to have at hand as you live your life. If you want a different mix of resources, getting them could reasonably require you to make a different choice.

This is not in any way intended to delegitimate people's experience of racism or abuse etc. But it is intended to re-introduce the idea that we are agents in our own lives in more respects than it is sometimes comfortable to acknowledge. If I choose to live in remote Labrador, I can expect that there will be lots more brilliantly fresh trout, and lots less cheap pineapple and winter lettuce. That's true whatever my own ethnic background. And it's not a Toronto or Halifax dweller's responsibility to subsidize me getting Romaine lettuce in January at the same price that it goes for in Toronto's supermarkets ... any more than it's a Labrador dweller's responsibility to subsidize the price of wild-caught speckled trout for Southern dwellers.

Similarly, tiny settlements and big cities have very different social dynamics - and not all of the characteristics of small are better. One abusive SOB can affect a much bigger proportion of the gene pool; a place where there are only a dozen adolescents probably won't have an enormous amount of variety as those kids look for someone to pair off with. That's not any outsider's historic oppression coming into play; it was as true in the centuries before Europeans came along with flags, guns, and a sense of superiority.

You seem to be exhibiting a lack of knowledge about the Indian Act (or whatever they have PC'd the name to these days) and the reserve system. The tribal system, and the way it is subject to government manipulation, might be a good thing to take a look at as well. I remember forty years ago a good friend of mine who was executive assistant to the minister of Indian Affairs was convinced that the best thing for the future of the First Nations would be to scrap the Indian Act. However, this has yet to happen and I doubt it ever will in my lifetime because vested First Nations interests have a considerable financial stake in maintaining the status quo. I certainly wouldn't live in squalor like Grassy Narrows unless I had to and the First Nations people of my acquaintance are certainly no dumber than anybody else.

TomF
02-20-2017, 10:30 AM
I'm aware of the Indian Act, and in particular am aware of the fights between Federal and Provincial jurisdictions over which order of Government is accountable to fund services for First Nations people, whether on-reserve, off-reserve, or (frequently) as people shift back and forth for this or that reason. My first job in government was as a cost-sharing analyst respecting Federal/Provincial funding for child welfare services. It's a colossal mess and failure, and I agree that the Acts in question have had the impact of creating and perpetuating much of it.

Dad was friends with a chief on the 6 Nations reserve just outside Brantford when I was a kid. The chief's opinion mirrored your friend's. He said that one impact of the Indian Act was that no band member was able to get a normal bank loan to buy, build or renovate anything on a reserve ... because the banks couldn't hold anything for collateral if someone defaulted. Same respecting getting loans for entrepreneurship; the impact of the Act, intended or otherwise, was to keep people who lived on-reserve dependent. He thought it was crap.

A friend who works down the hall is Cree, and has a status card etc. She chose to get an education, and has had quite a remarkable career. A senior administrator with the City of Toronto for a while, then in Health Canada. A short stint with the UN, before coming to New Brunswick (to be near her sick father). She's in her mid 50s now, and is training online for her next career, in an aspect of architecture. My friend has the same horrible family of origin stories that many tell - that's part of why she left the reserve. She's been a surrogate mom to a young lad for the past several years, whose own mother is still deep in the muck.

Choices are possible; they're not easy. But one can indeed make them, though any comes with a cost.

Landrith
02-20-2017, 11:24 AM
I'm aware of the Indian Act, and in particular am aware of the fights between Federal and Provincial jurisdictions over which order of Government is accountable to fund services for First Nations people, whether on-reserve, off-reserve, or (frequently) as people shift back and forth for this or that reason. My first job in government was as a cost-sharing analyst respecting Federal/Provincial funding for child welfare services. It's a colossal mess and failure, and I agree that the Acts in question have had the impact of creating and perpetuating much of it.

Dad was friends with a chief on the 6 Nations reserve just outside Brantford when I was a kid. The chief's opinion mirrored your friend's. He said that one impact of the Indian Act was that no band member was able to get a normal bank loan to buy, build or renovate anything on a reserve ... because the banks couldn't hold anything for collateral if someone defaulted. Same respecting getting loans for entrepreneurship; the impact of the Act, intended or otherwise, was to keep people who lived on-reserve dependent. He thought it was crap.

A friend who works down the hall is Cree, and has a status card etc. She chose to get an education, and has had quite a remarkable career. A senior administrator with the City of Toronto for a while, then in Health Canada. A short stint with the UN, before coming to New Brunswick (to be near her sick father). She's in her mid 50s now, and is training online for her next career, in an aspect of architecture. My friend has the same horrible family of origin stories that many tell - that's part of why she left the reserve. She's been a surrogate mom to a young lad for the past several years, whose own mother is still deep in the muck.

Choices are possible; they're not easy. But one can indeed make them, though any comes with a cost.

I know we are not better. My distant Indian ancestors were the run, hide, and pretend not to be Indian tribe that had the misfortune to have mistakenly ended up with a billion dollars of oil on their Oklahoma reservation lands in the 1920's at the end of the Trail of Tears. The genocide that followed didn't leave many on the rolls. I have seen the reservations of their casino wealth cousins today and they are not doing badly even on every social science measure except the incidence of diabetes. However their casino funded tribal clinics are among the best in treatment. I know these communities have nothing of the continuing poverty of the large Western remote reservations, but the Vice documentary was following young families in the clutches of the Canadian CPS, the child stealing of the urban children of those taken away by the government schools in the 60's. It resembled the worst of the CPS rackets here today on the majority non aboriginal population to the point I could not watch it further. Russel Means was right when he said the control techniques used by the government on the reservation would become the techniques it would use on the rest of us: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3IUnFq3U0Y

JimD
02-20-2017, 11:27 AM
I am going to suggest that essentially the only thing that accounts for the differences in behaviors of any populations is the circumstances they find themselves in. This is true of all people, everywhere. So why is it that the First Nations of Canada have such shorter life expectancies, higher rates of poverty, AIDS, illiteracy, criminal incarceration, and on and on? If you think it has anything to do with the fact that they are natives then you are racist. If you accept it is almost completely due to the circumstances they find themselves then let us ask how did they get into those circumstances? Hint: They didn't do it to themselves.

TomF
02-20-2017, 11:46 AM
I think that the reasons why people find themselves disproportionately in horrible situations can often have a bunch of racist factors at play which helped originate and perpetuate the toxic stew in which people find themselves. About 60% of the kids I worked with way back as a youth caseworker had some amount of First Nations heritage. They weren't on my caseload because they were First Nations, but because they were kids in need of Child Welfare protection. Because their parents couldn't keep it together, were into all the criminality that goes along with the drug culture perhaps, or were sexually or physically abusive. Because the dad had gone AWOL or was dead/incarcerated, and/or the mom had a revolving door of boyfriends and zip interest in parenting.

None of this had anything to do with a person's ethnicity. A whole lot of it, OTOH, had to do with racism. A whole lot of it also had to do with how much capacity the "adults" in the picture had to deal with the racism they experienced, and the family of origin abuse they experienced. It's hard to see how "health" can emerge from a social context where so many people are so broken. As I've said here before, the principal at a school on-reserve just outside Edmonton said that he estimated a 100% abuse rate of the kids in his school.

Every one.

Bear in mind that this same reserve sits on top of staggering oil wealth, which is distributed in quite large cheques to each adult member of the band. All that prosperity hasn't gone well, and that reserve has had serious (SERIOUS!) issues with gangs, with drug crime, with violence, with etc. for as long as I can remember. So the problem there isn't poverty, and the wealth hasn't led to wholesale development of brilliant housing conditions etc. The problem is that when there's a 100% abuse rate, there's no "healthy" community to draw on to turn things around. Even when people want to.

Now, growing up and living in the same horrible sociological conditions would make any of us stunted, damaged, incapable of being the best of who we are. The notion that "it takes a village to raise a child" is grounded in the hope that the village has enough residual health in it to be a serious resource. Some villages don't much support that idea, and replicate what can only be described as evil conditions. Again, that is nothing to do with racism or ethnicity .. but with psychological and sociological development.

I know people from that particular reserve who are doing amazing things in their lives, and embodying hope and healing. They don't live there anymore.

Dan McCosh
02-20-2017, 11:47 AM
So why would Dan McCosh say "Those of us with roots in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, use the term "American"?
Many of "us" with roots in Canada and Mexico, don't refer to ourselves as "American" therefore; No. We don't. Many Americans do refer to themselves as American. I would think that you may be in the minority. How do you refer to yourself?

Dumah
02-20-2017, 12:25 PM
As refering to #32, an aquaintance told me once "Tom, you just can't stand prosperity." I believe there is a lot of truth in that, most of us raised in less fortunate households find when we are inudated with more cash than we can handle we (and I include myself here) tend to go off the rails. To that end I have a trustee that helps me with the more mundane issues, paying my rent, internet, phone, lights, hard to believe to most that I NEVER was taught how to handle money. Yes, I had summer jobs and made (I guess) decent money, but the orders were to pass paycheque to mother who "put it in the bank". After 5 years of this, when I left home to join a $3.25/hr job in the city, mother passed me two $100 savings bonds. Apparently I wasn't allowed to know how much was there, or where it got to. This continued with the marriage, pass the cheque without cashing, and know NOTHING about household finances. Gee, I wonder why I still can't handle money?

Yes, I'm damaged, and I believe it won't be resolved any time soon. Don't get me wrong, my ex was an excellent money manager, we never wanted for much and my children were always fed and clothed. I would suggest, as a direct result of my own upbringing I knew no other way so when the marriage broke down I was woefully unprepared. Please think that there are more causes than stated for abuse of all kinds, whether it be physical, mental, or drugs. I thank the military for teaching me the meaning of "Honour, comaradarie, and loyalty", something my mother spoke of but never practiced.

Enough whining, back to the previous progromming.

Dumah

TomF
02-20-2017, 12:33 PM
I want to very quickly say that I realize how incredibly hard this stuff is; makes me hope that the Hindus are correct, and we get multiple lifetimes. I'm just off to the bank now, to send some groceries money to a dear, dear family member whose own family of origin shyte has left her broken beyond most imagining. In a very real sense, it's not her fault - her particular twig was so bent as it was forming that it's remarkable that she's alive these decades later. It's not exactly for lack of trying the other direction.

She's a wonderful, luminous person, however monstrously f#cked. Could she have made other choices along the years? You bet - but how much was her capacity to choose restricted by that horrible family of origin ... especially coupled with some tendencies it set off respecting mental illness. It makes me weep, the waste that's been laid to her life. In part, by herself.

Robert Meyer
02-20-2017, 12:38 PM
We should elect Red Green in 2020 then we would be part Canadian and entitled to wear the maple leaf whilst traveling abroad. Well maybe just a half leaf. Just saying.....
http://www.redgreen.com

B_B
02-20-2017, 01:04 PM
Many Americans do refer to themselves as American. I would think that you may be in the minority. How do you refer to yourself?
Many different ways, most in jest. But though I live in North America I have never referred to myself as an American. "We" don't, generally. ;) I am Canadian.

B_B
02-20-2017, 01:12 PM
...None of this had anything to do with a person's ethnicity...

I know people from that particular reserve who are doing amazing things in their lives, and embodying hope and healing. They don't live there anymore.

The tolerance to alcohol is not equally distributed throughout the world's population, and genetics of alcohol dehydrogenase (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_dehydrogenase) indicate resistance has arisen independently in different cultures.[2] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_tolerance#cite_note-Pakstis-2) In North America, Native Americans have the highest probability of developing alcoholism (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcoholism) compared to Europeans and Asians.[3] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_tolerance#cite_note-3)[4] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_tolerance#cite_note-4)[5] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_tolerance#cite_note-5)[6] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_tolerance#cite_note-6)


But your last sentence is the crux of the matter. People who are motivated, vested in self, generally make good choices and leave situations which are detrimental to their success. Be that reserves, ghettos, failed counties or countries.

Dan McCosh
02-20-2017, 01:28 PM
Many different ways, most in jest. But though I live in North America I have never referred to myself as an American. "We" don't, generally. ;) I am Canadian. Many Canadians refer to themselves as Canadians. We don't. Mainly because we aren't.

JimD
02-20-2017, 04:44 PM
... Could she have made other choices along the years? You bet...And this is were I diverge from mainstream thinking. Which also debunks any notion of Canadian exceptionalism or any other exceptionalism. Lucky for you, Tom, almost everyone will agree with you and consider me daft.:confused:

bob winter
02-20-2017, 06:12 PM
And this is were I diverge from mainstream thinking. Which also debunks any notion of Canadian exceptionalism or any other exceptionalism. Lucky for you, Tom, almost everyone will agree with you and consider me daft.:confused:

I will certainly agree with you.

JimD
02-20-2017, 06:21 PM
I will certainly agree with you.Two sane voices is a start :d

Lew Barrett
02-20-2017, 07:42 PM
.

I thought it was pretty funny myself

You don't need a flag pin to tell who are the Americans overseas. They can pick us out of a crowd no matter where we go. Not BSing, that's for real. In order to pass in some other country, you need to adopt the local style and loose 40 pounds. And don't talk.

Lew Barrett
02-20-2017, 07:51 PM
lThis look familiar Jim? It should. You took it.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/incanada.jpg

TomF
02-20-2017, 08:02 PM
Two sane voices is a start :d
Sanity is overrated.

Flying Orca
02-20-2017, 08:34 PM
Sanity is overrated.

I'm not sane, and neither am I. (And FWIW, my experience my views closely match Tom's. Shocking, I know.)

B_B
02-20-2017, 09:56 PM
You don't need a flag pin to tell who are the Americans overseas. They can pick us out of a crowd no matter where we go. Not BSing, that's for real. In order to pass in some other country, you need to adopt the local style and loose 40 pounds. And don't talk.
And stop wearing white socks with your sandals, and shorts. Dead giveaway - either an American or an Ontarian (same thing...)

Ron Williamson
02-20-2017, 10:02 PM
Piffle.
I don't even own any white socks.
R

JimD
02-20-2017, 11:33 PM
lThis look familiar Jim? It should. You took it.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Rita%20images/incanada.jpg

Nice boat! :)

Landrith
02-20-2017, 11:46 PM
You don't need a flag pin to tell who are the Americans overseas. They can pick us out of a crowd no matter where we go. Not BSing, that's for real. In order to pass in some other country, you need to adopt the local style and loose 40 pounds. And don't talk.

That is so true. In Asia at a mile away I could tell whether Europeans or Americans were getting off a bus.

Dave Hadfield
02-21-2017, 04:10 AM
What? I have to throw out my white socks???