PDA

View Full Version : Sully, the movie



Dan McCosh
01-24-2017, 09:53 AM
Just watched Clint Eastwood's movie about the pilot who landed the airplane in the Hudson River. The dramatic hook was the NTSB investigation of the pilot Sullenberger, which eventually supported his actions that saved some 155 crew and passengers. The movie has Sully correcting the NTSB's investigation, which made for some drama. This irritated the NTSB, which did not actually question the handling of the plane. The detailed re-creation of the incident portrayed hundreds of people acting rationally, bravely, unselfishly, often calmly, many doing what they had been trained to do in a serious emergency. In the end, that was the non-story, when everything went right after the birds took out the engines--and even the birds had been anticipated in advanced. In real life, the NTSB did a thorough investigation to see if the procedures could be improved. Somehow, a non-story managed to become a great story.

peb
01-24-2017, 02:25 PM
Although I enjoyed the movie, it did a real disservice to the NTSB investigators. The way the investigation was portrayed was also quite unbelievable. So I would not say it made a great story.

bamamick
01-24-2017, 02:34 PM
I haven't seen the movie but have been a part of dozens of incident investigation teams. In almost every case the investigation is not to find fault or blame, but to make sure that whatever the cause of the incident was is not repeated. Many times this results in an engineering solution, or some training/re-training. And yes, it is a royal pain in the arse and there is always empathy for the person(s) involved, but it has to be done in order for us all to have a safer world to live in.

Believe me, no one LIKES doing this stuff, but it has to be done. It is important that something positive come out of every incident or accident, and we do our best to make it so.

Mickey Lake

Steve McMahon
01-24-2017, 02:50 PM
Although I enjoyed the movie, it did a real disservice to the NTSB investigators. The way the investigation was portrayed was also quite unbelievable. So I would not say it made a great story.

I enjoyed the movie very much. I expect the portrayal of the NTSB (or any similar type of agency) may be a bit more accurate than we would like to think.

Jim Mahan
01-24-2017, 03:21 PM
They needed the dramatic invention of the idea that a bird strike had never before been both engines on an airliner. The notion that there has to be a villian, the overbearing government, just has to be there because otherwise film wouldn't make a box office hit.

Yeah other than that, it was a good movie, and a welcome break from softcore porn gun and car chases.

Jim Bow
01-24-2017, 03:51 PM
Find a copy of "Fly By Wire" by William Langewische. He relates the history of the Airbus and fly by wire technology. The airport. NYC aviation, geese, and the pilots themselves. Simply fascinating.

While you're at the library, he also has a book about the engineering masterpiece that was the deconstruction of the wreckage of the twin towers.
One misstep with a crane would have opened a flood into the entire subway system. Great read.
Langewische is a pilot, engineer, and great writer.

If you're interested, here's a bit of a bio: http://www.newnewjournalism.com/bio.php?last_name=langewiesche

Dan McCosh
01-24-2017, 03:56 PM
I haven't seen the movie but have been a part of dozens of incident investigation teams. In almost every case the investigation is not to find fault or blame, but to make sure that whatever the cause of the incident was is not repeated. Many times this results in an engineering solution, or some training/re-training. And yes, it is a royal pain in the arse and there is always empathy for the person(s) involved, but it has to be done in order for us all to have a safer world to live in.

Believe me, no one LIKES doing this stuff, but it has to be done. It is important that something positive come out of every incident or accident, and we do our best to make it so.

Mickey LakeI've know a few people who do aircraft accident investigation, and they tend to love their work. It's very interesting detective work, with the satisfaction of adding to the overall safety of the industry.

bamamick
01-24-2017, 04:21 PM
Dan, the difference being that no one here does a job like that as their primary function. We are all in production, logistics, engineering, etc. AND safety. We have what's called a Central Safety Team and there must always be a 'disinterested' party on the team, someone who does not actually work in that plant or unit, but we are all-internal. Only in the event of an injury will OSHA be involved. In the event of a release it'd be ADEM.

I would imagine that in the case of a NTSB investigator you'd pretty much HAVE to love your job to be good at it.

Mickey Lake

Breakaway
01-24-2017, 05:30 PM
I once had an office on the 43rd floor of 1633 Broadway, NYC( paramount plaza). I saw the plane land in the Hudson. Was dumbfounded.

I did not see the movie( but will).

Kevin


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro