PDA

View Full Version : Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY



Larchmont Jim
01-22-2017, 06:00 PM
I am about a month into a project to build a Clint Chase-designed Calendar Islands Yawl. This will be the 5th boat i have built... yes it can become an affliction. Er... I mean addiction. Or avocation. Or, to my wife and kids, occasionally an annoyance, especially if I run the sander or table saw in the garage. So I'm starting build log here. Not to impart building wisdom, because there are many threads from much better builders than I, but primarily to show the design and the efficiency which which Clint has dsigned the kit.

I've moved progressively up the complexity and tools-required ladder with each build, and picked up enough skill to attempt this one. I'm working from Clint's plywood kit, but doing all the spars and other solid timber myself. My training ground and progressively expanding toolkit:

1) Pygmy Boats Arctic Tern 14 kayak: japanese handsaw, cordless drill, orbital sander
2) Pygmy Boats Murrelet: block plane, spokeshave even though i didn't really need them; Pygmy kits require almost no real wordworking (but produce wonderful boats!)
3) CLC Northeaster Dory: sabre saw, trim router
4) Dave Gentry Ruth wherry: table saw

And for this one, I sprung for a 10" bandsaw even though I probably only 'needed' it to make the oars.

I love my NE Dory, it's a fantastic boat and probably the most evenly balanced boat between being a good rower and being a good sailer that you can get. But I wanted something with a little more volume and freeboard for safety on the Maine Island Trail, but also a boat i could sleep aboard. (With the dory, you must find a campsite at night not just a tight gunkhole. ) But I still wanted a boat easily beachable and movable by two people. Not to mention one that i could build within the confines of a one-car garage. The CIY looks to fit the bill perfectly.

Me and my garage (shop) are located about a mile from Long Island Sound and 6 miles from the NY City line in Larchmont, NY. Next up, some photos as soon as I figure out how to post them.

James McMullen
01-22-2017, 06:05 PM
Good for you, Jim! That's a very good looking boat, and Clint Chase knows exactly what he's doing. I'll be rooting for you and following with interest.

James McMullen
01-22-2017, 06:08 PM
Probably should bump up to a 20 bandsaw though, just in case. It's okay, tell your wife I said you could have one. Just have her call me if you run into any problems there. :D

Larchmont Jim
01-22-2017, 06:11 PM
If this works properly, it means i have figured out how to post a photo...

https://plus.google.com/109521689897209169709/posts/ZQYZN94vHvT

Larchmont Jim
01-22-2017, 06:19 PM
If i follow the plans closely, it ought to come out looking something like this:

https://plus.google.com/109521689897209169709/posts/aSu4NHavL6Y

John hartmann
01-22-2017, 06:47 PM
Good choice! Following with interest, and looking forward to your thread.

Rich Jones
01-22-2017, 07:25 PM
Will be watching. Nice looking design.

Clinton B Chase
01-22-2017, 10:13 PM
Have fun Jim, I'll be watching too, you know where to find me when you have questions :)

Larchmont Jim
01-22-2017, 11:29 PM
I spent the first few weeks building stuff out that didnt come when the, that is the oars and the spars. All out of sitka spruce i got at ML Condon, a fantastic lumber yard in White Plains NY. I got a clear, vertical grain 17' rough sawn 2"x8" for the mainmast, not even the tiniest knot in it. And shorter ones for the other spars and oars. Wood like this is not cheap though; about $500 for all i need for this boat. Here you can see my handiwork, a box-section hollow boom, a round solid yard, rectangular mizzen and mizzen sprit, and two oars. The oars were from plans and patterns from CLC.

https://plus.google.com/109521689897209169709/posts/VE3p5EgcUbJ

Larchmont Jim
01-22-2017, 11:34 PM
Absurdly warm weather this weekend meant I could do some table saw work outdoors. To rip a 17' board into staves for the mast you need a >34' space (I guess I am as good at math as at boat building|:)) and that's a bit bigger than my garage. So i got 8 staves milled as you can see in the photo.

Larchmont Jim
01-22-2017, 11:42 PM
Also got the daggerboard trunk half-assembled this weekend. Then covered the inside with epoxy mixed with graphite. Muy slippery. Never used graphite before but it sounds like a good idea.

https://plus.google.com/photos/photo/109521689897209169709/6378649321125297026?iem=4&gpawv=1&hl=en-US

Larchmont Jim
01-22-2017, 11:49 PM
Last task of a busy weekend-- getting all of the plywood and chipboard pieces separated out of the router-cut sheets and cleaning up several zillion of those little nubs left by the router... which leaves you with a prodigious pile of offcut wreckage and sawdust. This will become the world's most highly engineered firewood. I kept the larger scraps which may come in handy. This Bruyneel okoume is nice stuff.

https://plus.google.com/photos/photo/109521689897209169709/6378649322573021842?iem=4&gpawv=1&hl=en-US

johngsandusky
01-25-2017, 06:41 AM
Looks like fun.
Maybe I'll see you on the Sound sometime.

Clinton B Chase
01-26-2017, 04:01 PM
Wish there was a good way to get a photo from Google Photos onto a post...

Larchmont Jim
01-26-2017, 11:37 PM
OK so after an hour and half of screwing around trying to figure out how to post the actual photo in this thread I have figured out that I'm not a total idiot, but that Google makes it impossible. They have some kind of roundabout links to photos that don't work for embedding in this forum. So going through the rigamarole of moving photos to Flickr, now I think I have it figured out.

More laminating to do. The stem is a clever design. Instead of having to cut, plane and then glue a bunch of solid wood strips into a laminated stem, the CIY kit provides you with 5 pieces of CNC-cut ply that you laminate in a transverse fashion (i.e. all the ply pieces run for-and-aft and you laminate around the centerline piece). Even more clever, you just align all 5 pieces with CNC-drilled temp screw holes, and then the edges of each piece tell you where you need to plane to:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/370/32505439346_669874d1f7_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-26-2017, 11:40 PM
And the result is like this:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/700/32393971162_e47737767f_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-26-2017, 11:43 PM
Here you can see the whole stem assembly. It also includes a centerline support for where the forward deck will go.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/719/31734365353_bae5d026af_b.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-26-2017, 11:45 PM
And yet more laminating, of the rudder and kickup rudder blade

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/352/32167254250_e7dc02e39a_c.jpg


The kit includes some CNC-cut templates that make it pretty easy to get the right foil shape. I'm not quite there yet, but close:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/605/32505439736_a2b4663487_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-26-2017, 11:56 PM
Enough with the laminating alright!!!

Last I think, but not least, the daggerboard. This thing is BIG.

Clint suggests a test fit in the clamped-together daggerboard trunk before you glue the trunk sides together. I tried that and it's already a reasonably snug fit, and I haven't glassed the daggerboard yet. The glass will make it a bit wider. I think I'll hold off on the trunk until the daggerboard is completely finished!

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/285/32167253240_5bb95634e3_c.jpg

webishop14
01-27-2017, 10:33 PM
Wise choice. Embiggening a dagger board trunk can be challenging. Easier to just not go there.

Bill

keyhavenpotterer
01-29-2017, 11:12 AM
so enjoying this thread. thanks for posting. from the very first images of CIY

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/566994cb57eb8d30818d9963/57956e4c37c58136e65a449f/57956e6d37c58136e65a459d/1469410933766/P1000731.JPG?format=500w


i was captivated and now I can enjoy the great kit design and building skills displayed

Larchmont Jim
01-29-2017, 10:22 PM
Thanks Keyhavenpotterer for the photo of the finished boat. It is much more interesting to see a boat rather than a bunch of random parts! I think that is Jim Levang's, he built what was essentially the prototype. Clint was confident enough in the CAD design (or foolish enough to take the risk) that he sold the first kit to Jim without ever having built one. That it went together quite well is testament to the capability of modern computer design...

For those of you in forumland who want to know what the finished design is supposed to be, in addition to that photo I post here a drawing from the plans:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/578/32505442236_c22f0d8e76_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-29-2017, 10:25 PM
Building progress... this weekend was consumed with more pre-hull building steps. Glassing the daggerboard:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/432/32560972456_3650a0df00_c.jpg

And epoxy sealing the rudder (no glass):

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/773/32466780351_4c486e59b2_c.jpg

Rudder is a kick-up, that is the top and this is the kickup blade:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/665/31786738333_d48795ac76_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-29-2017, 10:30 PM
The other big (actually biggest in terms of time consumed) job of the weekend was tapering all 8 of the birdsmouth mast staves. Taking the station widths off of the plans, I drew the shape, cut and planed one stave and then used it as a pattern for the other 7. A pretty squirrelly cut on the bandsaw followed by a lot of planing on the first one, but by the 8th stave I had gotten the bandsaw skill down to where I was able to cut pretty consistently close to the drawn pen-line and not have to do a lot of planing.

I'll need a decent weather weekend to take the bandsaw outside and cut the birdsmouth "v" into each of these, hopefully next weekend.
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/673/32478668231_7e71f43bd6_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-29-2017, 10:40 PM
Just for yucks I got out a couple of big pieces and did a quick-fit because I wanted to see something that actually resembled part of a boat. Here is the transom and the next-forward bulkhead, which join together with a very cool tab-and-wedge system for gluing. Side tanks and what will be a hinged lazarette in the center. Plus the center bulkhead sitting forward of it. I am amazed by the size... the tail end of my dory is maybe a foot wide; this boat has a generous "bustle". Exactly why I wanted it -- room enough for a sleeping platform and ability to camp aboard.

You can get a sense of scale by the yardstock sitting on top of the aft bulkhead:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/530/32561385376_9a6c07dc76_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-29-2017, 10:47 PM
Boatbuilding is fun, but getting out on the water is more fun. MLK Day, 2 weeks ago, your humble correspondent in his Pygmy Murrelet kayak out on Long Island Sound. Believe it or not, that woodsy land in front of me is the Bronx, NY:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/640/32466783951_59c33ca69b_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
01-31-2017, 12:01 AM
An hour and a half after work spent epoxy coating one side of the transom, bulkheads and frames, plus the 2nd side of the daggerboard. If I epoxy coat them now it will be a lot easier than doing them once they are assmbled into the boat. The masking tape is to keep raw wood where the fillets will eventually go, which will make for a better glue joint.

I am using Raka 127 epoxy for this build. My prior boats were built with System Three or MAS. So far the Raka is working great. The only difference I detect between it and those brands is that the Raka cost literally half as much. Maybe it cures a little harder than System Three (the plane just skips over it). I ordered it directly from Raka in Florida. Good quick service, very happy with it.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/336/31778663504_74daa20d70_c.jpg

Falcon1
01-31-2017, 01:50 PM
Looks great! I'm just reading the article on the CIY in Small Boats ( The annual, paper issue) It is a beautiful deisgn.

This is another thread that makes me wish I had ordered a kit for my Ilur.:pmad: Live and learn.

Please keep documenting.

Mike

webishop14
01-31-2017, 06:57 PM
Mike --

Building from the plans teaches you far more than just how to put a kit together. My opportunity (scrap?) pile attests to my learning experience. I'm sure my next boat (also built from plans) will be a much finer build for having built my first.

Bill

Larchmont Jim
02-01-2017, 12:31 AM
Building from lumber and plans does indeed develop skills that the kit builder will not gain. I respect those who do it the old-fashioned way. However, I have a more-than-full time job, and way too many hobbies to actually be able to pursue as it is. The kit is an enormous time saver, and most likely a finished product quality-improver. Ultimately my goal is more to sail than to build, so time savings is a wonderful thing. Plus, this particular design was born in CAD on the computer, so it would seem kind of silly to take those CNC instructions and convert them back to a lines plan so that the builder could then spile the planks to recreate what was already created on the computer... and have much less accurately cut planks than the CNC machine produces.

Plus I am a believer in modern technology and think it's pretty cool that it can be used to produce a sweet, traditional looking boat based on some very traditional design learnings. Kudos to Clint Chase for conceiving such cool trad designs for amateur builders using modern materials. I kind of wish I had a Deblois Street Dory, the most awesome uber-traditional boat built in modern ply and epoxy. (It's about one order of magnitude cooler than the CLC NE Dory I do have).

My concession to old-fashionedness is that I am making all of the solid wood parts from rough-sawn boards obtained at a lumber yard. A purist would cut his own trees and saw his own boards from logs. But I live in a city and don't have that luxury. At least I didn't just go out and buy a floating Clorox bottle!

webishop14
02-01-2017, 02:04 AM
Hello, Jim --

I didn't mean to disparage your choice. Your priorities are valid. They work for you, and that's all that's needed. I simply wanted to point out that Mike was learning more by building from plan than he would from a kit ("Live and learn" ?).

I'm not about to go out in search of trees to fell, to mill into the planks I need. (1/4" ply?) In the end, we do what pleases us. I would observe that for some of us building a boat is like getting a tattoo -- before the current one is finished we're dreaming of the next one.

Bill

Clinton B Chase
02-01-2017, 04:52 PM
I kind of wish I had a Deblois Street Dory, the most awesome uber-traditional boat built in modern ply and epoxy. (It's about one order of magnitude cooler than the CLC NE Dory I do have).



Well that makes me feel warm all over!

I used to be vehemently against building from kits. I was interested very much in building a Swallowboats design but only kits were available which was frustrating for me at the time. I felt that I could learn more from plans and I had some boatbuilding training so that pushed me that way, too.

However, when you build a boat in the computer (notice I did not say design)....when you BUILD a boat in the computer, it is quite silly to try to then build that same boat from plans from a practical point of view, especially if you want to start with offsets. (I don't even make tables of offsets as part of the plans.) However, it is not silly if the builder really has the time and desire to draw out all the parts that would normally come precut. It makes sense to build from plans if you really love spending hours upon hours laying out all the profiles of the normally precut parts and cutting to those lines and cleaning up with hand tools. You get good at those skills!

Then again, I am watching my customers learn heaps about working with epoxy well and spend more time on cutting solid wood parts that fit and spending time on details such as the rigging when that can get rushed. Moreover, they are getting more time in on the painting and fit out because of the time savings. So they get a better boat, it seems.

Then again, I recently converted a boat to offsets for a school project because the goal was to learn to loft. That made sense. They then used full size patterns for a number of parts as well as generated their own from the loft floor. I remember lofting a curved raked transom for the first time and the designer who was in house told us to come get the FSP to compare to our lofted transom. It is a great tool to have patterns and precut parts from the computer.

And to go on about one more thing, the boat comes out on the shop floor only as good as it was built in the computer and transferred into cutting files for the kit. If it goes together wrong in the computer, it will come out the same 'wrong' in the real world. Like Jim mentioned, I was confident enough with my software and my abilities building the boat in the computer at that point to let the first builder of CIY hull #1 have the first wack at building the kit, 1300 miles away. I did build a quarter scale model.

Skegemog
02-01-2017, 05:19 PM
Hey Clint, we met at the SRR last summer (you kindly sent me some really beautiful pics of my brother and me in GINGER my NGH Coquina), thanks again.
I just wanted to chime in here and second you about using CAD to engineer stuff for building. I design and build (with help) all kinds of architectural woodwork and furniture for a living and I have literally tons and tons of equipment, hand tools, edge tools, all manner of stuff but the most important tools by far I have are CAD software. Leaving aside the ability to export instruction to CNC equipment, the leverage you get from being able to design and engineer virtually in 3-dimensions is difficult to explain to people not used to using it. And the more complex the end product the more leverage you get. The fact that the license for decent software is no longer prohibitive for a small business helps as well.
I have contemplated "building" a traditional carvel planked boat in CAD just for the pleasure of it. Anyway, I'm glad to see this thread here because this is a little discussed topic and while the graybeards may get disgruntled a good tool is a good tool. Look forward to possibly seeing you at SRR 17, Jim

webishop14
02-01-2017, 08:39 PM
I agree wholeheartedly with what Clint has posted. Twenty years ago I "built" in CAD (AutoCAD R14) a complete 3-D model of a high-speed roll-fed labeling machine. As it turned out, the computer I was blessed with was the only one in the company powerful enough to load and display the model (but only with much groaning). Building models in CAD is a great way to design. A teammate and I designed and built another similar machine from the ground up in 3-D, going from design specification to shipping out the back door of the plant in 6 months, with only one part on the scrap heap. CAD is a great tool, and I see a lot of fine looking boats being turned out this way -- eg. Francois Vivier. I would suggest that Clint does more than JUST build models of boats in CAD. Whatever design tools you use, you still need to make design decisions. This, not that; here, not there. Don't sell yourself short, Clint.

Skegemog
02-01-2017, 09:13 PM
Whatever design tools you use, you still need to make design decisions. This, not that; here, not there. Don't sell yourself short, Clint.
Hear, hear!

Larchmont Jim
02-05-2017, 09:14 AM
A cold but dry Saturday allowed me to get the table saw outdoors and I got the "Birds mouths" cut into the mainmast staves.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/657/32593645231_d62f4d1d31_c.jpg

And now with most of the parts assembly done, I spent a good part of the day rearranging the shell game that is my garage in order to make enough room to set up the building frame. The kit comes with the main parts of the building frame pre-cut, and the long pieces splice together with puzzle joints, so it makes it very easy to come up with a straight frame. Then the moulds slot right into precut slots in the frame, also super easy. I had to do almost no measuring to get the frame set up. Next step, to level it carefully.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/683/32716338435_303636c6e0_c.jpg

BrianMCarney
02-06-2017, 08:55 PM
Kudos to Clint Chase for conceiving such cool trad designs for amateur builders using modern materials. I kind of wish I had a Deblois Street Dory, the most awesome uber-traditional boat built in modern ply and epoxy. (It's about one order of magnitude cooler than the CLC NE Dory I do have).


I really want to build a Deblois St. Dory.

Larchmont Jim
02-12-2017, 06:31 PM
4 days of business travel last week, so no progress until the weekend. Saturday I glued up the scarfs in all the planks. The planks in the kit have very cool multi-level puzzle joints that make aligning the planks super-easy and provide a lot of gluing surface:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/623/32867917335_f11bcdb311_c.jpg

Clint suggests using a string line to check the alignment of each plank. I did that for two of them, found they aligned well and the joints fit tightly allowing no play, so I didn't bother aligning any more. I would have had to glue one plank at a time to check the alignment. Being lazy and rushed, I just glued all the planks at once, in two stacks with plastic sheets in between each plank. Here is my gluing setup:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/514/32826806346_d6dfab8ab0_c.jpg

Works great, saves a lot of time, and the joints almost all came out looking perfect, which would be this. Note that the puzzle joint is all hidden inside:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2545/32867916985_ef299d5a7b_c.jpg

But... dooh I used one plastic divider sheet that was a little too small, and two of the planks became one. Out came the heavy artillery (a 1" chisel and a mallet" and it had to separate the Siamese twin planks. Not good. Note to self: don't skip on the plastic sheets!! Because now I have some body -shop work to do on two planks:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2766/32025044344_e1e2222514_c.jpg

I figure I'm doing pretty well if after 6 weeks of working, this is my biggest fubar to date.

Larchmont Jim
02-12-2017, 09:44 PM
The other project this weekend was building a roller. I keep my dory on a floating dock at my local boat club. It's so light that I have been able to launch and retrieve it using just a cylindrical fender as a roller. I think that the CIY, which will take the dory's spot on the dock, will be too big for that. So a roller mounted at the edge of the dock is called for. With some scrap doug fir 2x4's that I had lying around, plus a galvanized grounding bar from Home Depot for the axle, I made this:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/363/32870590265_80bc2f4b4e_c.jpg

The plan was in my head already and then I recently saw an article in Small Boats Monthly that gave a few hints on how to make one of these as well. A harcutting board from the kitchen gave its life to become what I hope to be low-friction bushings.

cracked lid
02-12-2017, 10:54 PM
If it happens again, its worth breaking out the heat gun to see if you can heat the epoxy enough to separate the wood before breaking out the chisel. Never had to do it with something on this scale, but I've been able to separate smaller epoxied joints with just a heat gun and a little force. Continued application of heat allows for using a scraper to scrape the wood clean and give it another go.

Larchmont Jim
02-14-2017, 07:39 AM
Heat gun... good one, I should have thought of that. That might have led to less destruction. Fortunately, not enough wood was ripped out to compromise the strength of the plan, and a little epoxy bondo fixed the problem:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2778/32772894551_b5a7a610ae_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
02-16-2017, 12:10 AM
Tasks over the past couple of days: set up cradles for mast gluing, dry fit & clamp the mast staves,

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/262/32774313992_20aaa714fb_c.jpg

and mill the plugs that will go in each end of the mast during the glue-up. Masthead plug of oak:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/263/32547371590_4ab139bf69_c.jpg

and plug for the foot of the mast made of sitka, eight-sided on the table saw. I had to glue it up from two pieces because I didn't have any single piece thick enough:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2366/32113066003_c7474ea1ce_c.jpg

WI-Tom
02-16-2017, 09:01 AM
Are you gluing tapers into the plugs? I might worry about a hard spot if the inner plugs are not tapered--do the plans talk about that?

I know I've seen threads here on that somewhere. Never built a birdsmouth spar myself, so I'm just curious if that is necessary.

Tom

Larchmont Jim
02-16-2017, 10:34 AM
The plans didn't call for tapering the staves on the foot end; the staves are straight for at least 6 feet. So the plug section for that end is straight also, no tapering required. The taper in the mast from the partner down to the mast step end will come from planing down the staves on the outside. I think it will be a good idea to taper the top 2 or 3 inches of the foot plug just a bit to relieve any potential "hard spot" at that end.

The plug I cut for the masthead is only 7 inches long, and the amount of taper in the inside diameter of the mast over that length is small. Plus the plug is fairly loose fitting anyway, and will just be cemented in place with epoxy to fill the gaps in my amateur-level joinery (compounded by my el cheapo table saw which doesn't cut very accurate angles).

BrianMCarney
02-16-2017, 10:51 AM
Jim, I don't have a good picture of it (thought I did; can't find it...), but you might consider cutting a crown-type shape into the top of the bottom plug. This picture (not sure whose it is--sorry to the photog!) is in a square piece, but the idea is the same for an octagonal one:
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7330/9228508060_f6b519d0a1_b.jpg
The idea is that then the plug doesn't create a hard point in the mast just above the partners. Four quick cuts on a band saw after you've shaped the plug would do it. I did the same on my mast, FWIW.

BrianMCarney
02-16-2017, 10:56 AM
That picture came from this thread, which may be of interest generally:

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?188876-Internal-blocking-in-a-birdsmouth-mast

Larchmont Jim
02-26-2017, 10:47 PM
Today we glued up the mainmast. Special thanks to Brian Carney, who made himself known to me via this forum and who lives just 5 miles from me, for graciously offering to help me with what is definitively a 2-man task. Brian has a Goat Island Skiff that he built so this task was a repeat for him.

Since the staves were reasonably well milled, everything went together smoothly. Here are the plugs in each end of the mast. We also put a solid core in the mast where it will encounter the mast partner, complete with wedges cut out of it to give it a crown shape similar to Brian's post above and to match Clint's drawing. The plug in the masthead will be cut flush:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/632/32758118500_4dc637c323_c.jpg

Whereas the plug at the butt of the mast will be rounded and will become the mortise that sticks into the mast step:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/656/33013621381_5158dfc27c_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
03-11-2017, 01:27 PM
Three weekends away from home meant little progress, but I finish shaping and sanding the mast and got a coat of varnish on it. So nice to see what was just rough wood become something finished! Now it's time to set up the molds and get working on the hull.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/653/33335805666_4a788ed73b_c.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/724/32561988073_42efc29a17_c.jpg

BrianMCarney
03-11-2017, 06:07 PM
Looks lovely!

Larchmont Jim
03-12-2017, 08:04 PM
Woo-hoo, after 2 months of making parts, I'm finally starting to work on something that resembles a boat. This weekend was spent setting up the molds and bulkheads, and then gluing and filleting the ends and the middle. Specifically, the stem assembly to the forward bulkhead:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2824/32537723644_f97f77f98e_c.jpg

, the daggerboard trunk to the middle bulkhead, and the aft bulkhead to the "sternposts" and the transom.

It is quite ingenious how the strongback, molds and boat parts all go together. The two molds (where there is no bulkhead have come with this pre-cut right angle brace that makes getting everything square and level very easy:

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3741/32565279364_d716506ff0_c.jpg

and the result is a nicely constructed mold/boat parts with all the bulkheads/frames already in place.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/686/33252232892_58ca0c6dab_c.jpg

Next step, the bottom and garboard planks!

PhillySailor
03-13-2017, 07:12 AM
Looks really good Jim! And very familiar! I think the gussets for the aft bulkhead may go on the front of the strongback. Very interesting watching your progress. I am going to have Clint cut the spar timbers as I don't think my table saw skills and time would be an easy one for all of those.

-Nick

Larchmont Jim
03-13-2017, 09:39 PM
Eagle eye Nick, you are spot on on the gusset location! I took this photo before gluing everything, then I read the instructions carefully and they clearly state that the gussets go on the aft side of bulkhead #1 (fwd) and bulkhead #3 (amid) but on the forward side of aft bulkhead #5. I had all three of them wrong, so i moved them before gluing anything.

HOWEVER, your eagle eye might also notice that the two stern posts which are supposed to have the already-attached cleats on the outboard sides, (ie insides of the side tanks) have them on the inboard sides here. I did not catch that, and the sternposts are now quite permanently epoxied into the wrong sides. So tonight's task is to cut and fit cleats on the "new" outboard sides of the sternposts. An annoying, but recoverable, error. I will also have some work to do later cutting down the height of the top inboard cleat by 1/8" with a rabbet plane to get it down to the height you are supposed to glue it into.

In a further "doooh" maneuver, I glued in the daggerboard trunk, forgetting that I had not gotten around to attaching the specified hardwood side cheeks to it yet. Because I didnt have any of the right wood at hand when I assembled the trunk a month ago. I guess i'll apply those in situ...

I'll be watching your progress as well. Who will launch first? When we get these things built we should have a Northeast CIY class rendezvous-- all 2 of us!

Larchmont Jim
03-14-2017, 09:53 AM
First screwup fixed -- attached additional cleats to outboard sides of stern posts. These will be twice as reinforced as is called for in the plans...

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/689/32624011373_d537293931_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
03-14-2017, 09:56 AM
The wedges that hold everything tight while gluing can now be removed. A few raps with a chisel and then flush sawing with a Japanese pull saw do the trick. It's not beautiful, but will get faired and painted over anyway.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3700/33054837060_e9fafa951c_c.jpg

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2910/32594964034_83de4f9c16_c.jpg

Clinton B Chase
03-14-2017, 01:09 PM
Lookin' good!

My Echo Bay's use the tab-n-lock system as well. One student/customer at WBS last summer wanted to varnish the outside of their boat. We plunged a router bit and cleaned out the slot and put in a wood colored epoxy and they were good to go with the varnish. In fact, their boat is one of the boat's of the year in Maine Boats Homes and Harbors.

Larchmont Jim
03-14-2017, 09:47 PM
Hey Clint,

i plan to keep that great big transom varnished, so i filled those slots with some wood-colored epoxy. But i was also thinking of just covering those two spots with wood onlays of some sort - maybe stars or compass roses. The bulkheads will just get painted.

Larchmont Jim
03-15-2017, 10:34 PM
Tonight's extracurricular activity was cutting the holes in the tanks for the inspection ports. The drawings call for putting the 6" plastic circular inspection ports in the tank tops. But I didn't want plastic so conspicuously located in the boat (I plan to varnish the tank tops) and I wanted to be able to stow some long thin stuff for camp cruising (thermarest, camp stool, tent) inside the tanks. So I checked with Clint and he said it's fine to put the ports in the bulkheads.

But the bulkheads are already mounted on the building frame. It would be really hard to get a decent cut with a saber saw. So I made a template on the bandsaw that could be mounted on the bulkhead and then I can use a router with a flush cut bit to "follow" the template. Added advantage, I only had to cut carefully one template... then got 4 identical holes.

Here's the template -- on the left and the "hole" cutout on the right:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2884/33083372510_e96d0033d5_c.jpg

Cutting big holes in your boat is kind of scary, but this method made it less dangerous to screw up. They came out pretty good, and they don't have to be perfect because the flange of the port will cover the edge of the cutout hole.

Aft tanks:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/711/33426073346_2de3e31bf7_c.jpg

And forward tank:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/753/32652368323_d79008aebc_c.jpg

I think it would be easier if the bulkheads in the kit came with the holes already cut in them! Clint you should consider that. Or provide a CNC-cut template in the kit so the builder can use it to rout out their holes where they want them.

Clinton B Chase
03-16-2017, 06:51 AM
Hi Jim, Nice work.

It's a good suggestion to precut the holes on the kits and I do on a number, but then some folks want the holes in the tank top and others in the bulkhead. So I left the holes out on this one until I saw what people generally liked. I would put one in the forward and one in aft tank top. You will need three deck plates...which is fine. I agree on the precut pattern...good idea!

Larchmont Jim
03-26-2017, 10:07 PM
Lots of travel, for business and otherwise, has meant slow progress on the building lately.

Before starting the planking, I thought it would be a good idea to make cardboard patterns of the molds that I can use to cut some cradles for when I turn the boat over. I did one of each of the two molds that don't become part of the boat, and the after bulkhead. Sure, the molds will still be available once I take the boat off the building frame, and I suppose I could use those to cut cradles out, but this way I can cut cradles in advance and have them at the ready. And of course the bulkhead won't be available to use for a pattern to cut a cradle, since it will be inside the boat, if I decide I need cradles at three different locations.
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2854/33516384232_8ce5101692_c.jpg

Now, finally, on to the planking! Over the course of the past week I did get the bottom plank and the garboards on though. First the bottom plank, weighed down by a bunch of old tiles while the epoxy sets:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2948/33180817780_4a0021138e_c.jpg

And voila -- the bottom and garboards epoxied and filleted - sort of - to the frames, stitched and glued to each other, cut to length at the transom, stitches removed and joints sanded. Almost ready for glassing, but first I have a few screw holes to fill.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3933/33673039505_063d1c3efe_c.jpg

keyhavenpotterer
03-27-2017, 09:09 AM
still here, very much enjoying your updates, and now the exciting planking bit. The method of using plank edge to edge and then lapstrake sides seems a really good solution to me.

Larchmont Jim
03-27-2017, 01:15 PM
The stitch and glue of the bottom panel to the garboards was familiar to me because that's the way CLC does it "Lapstitch" boats, including my Northeaster Dory. For a boat built on a frame/molds the importance of the stitches is much less, as the planks are held in pretty close contact by the planks temp screwed to the molds/bulkheads and you're not counting on the stitches to force the shape into the hull before gluing. It was really only necessary to hold the planks into vertical alignment in the spans between the frames. The advantage is it allows glassing of the bottom and garboards in one unit with glass going over the joint, which allows the plywood used to be thinner than otherwise. In fact Clint has spec'd 6mm plywood even for the bottom panel, which struck me as a bit light (the NE Dory uses 9mm for the bottom and garboards), but he says that with the glass on it, it's plenty sturdy.

Clinton B Chase
03-28-2017, 07:03 PM
[QUOTE=Larchmont Jim;5195186]Lots of travel, for business and otherwise, has meant slow progress on the building lately.

Before starting the planking, I thought it would be a good idea to make cardboard patterns of the molds that I can use to cut some cradles for when I turn the boat over.
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2854/33516384232_8ce5101692_c.jpg


Good Idea...I'll be doing cradles as part of future kits.

Larchmont Jim
03-28-2017, 09:54 PM
This week's business trip got cancelled, so I am actually making some progress at nights this week.

Tonight's task was cleaning up all the epoxy fairing putty I had used to fill screw holes and wire holes -- a task made way too laborious because I had put too much of the stuff on and had lots of Shinto rasping and sanding to do. Followed by taping the glued seams between bottom plank and garboards.

The kit instructions say to cut a strip of cloth off the 6 oz. fiberglass swath you're going to use to cover the whole bottom and use that, but I think that would lead to a real mess of fraying fibers. I got some 2-inch glass tape from Raka that has almost no selvage edge that would absorb epoxy and then have to be scraped off. This tape doesn't fray at the edges and is very easy to use. Seems to work well:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2868/33555266922_41d380400b_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
03-29-2017, 11:09 PM
"Ahh, I love the smell of epoxy in the evening!" (Sort of a paraphrase from Apocalypse Now...) 6 oz glass cloth goes on next, onto the entire bottom panel and garboards.

A quick once-over on the tape edges with a cabinet scraper took off the not-too-high selvage edges first. Then I put blue tape on the garboard edges exactly where the bevel will be cut, so that I can later cut the glass at the tape line with a boxcutter knife and remove the glass. That way I won't have to plane through it when beveling for the plank lap. My plane blade does NOT like glass or epoxy!

I have heard two schools of thought on whether one should saturate the plywood first before laying on the glass. I learned it on my Pygmy kayaks as a 3 -step process: 1) roll saturation coat on bare wood 2) after that is no longer tacky but within 12 hours, lay on the glass and the first epoxy fill coat 3) come back within 12 hours and put in next fill coat. But I recently watched Eric Blake on an OffCenter Harbor video express a strong preference for doing it by laying glass on the clean wood and filling it with epoxy all in one, replacing steps (1) and (2) above. I did it that way here; for horizontal surfaces I think it works great, I got full saturation and it saved a lot of time. Not sure how well it would work on a vertical or near-vertical surface though.

I'll roll on a fill coat in the morning while I can still get a chemical bond with the not-fully cured epoxy in the weave.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3698/33690097616_46c0c25b99_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
04-06-2017, 10:42 PM
Finally onto planking... cutting laps, cutting gains, and epoxying everything together. Cutting the laps is complicated by the flimsiness of 6mm plywood planks. You really have to use two hands with a block plane, one to hold the plane and the other to hold the back of the plane -- actually to squeeze the plane and the plank together-- as you move the plane along. Forget about using a #4 plane for this job. But okoume is soft so it's easy to plane, and the plys make it easy to calibrate the evenness of the bevel.

The Stanley #78 rabbet plane makes easy work of the gains for the bow.

I'm using a clamping batten and drywall screws into backing blocks to clamp the laps for gluing. The first one I did with a 1/2" thick spruce batten and the forward end came out with low spots between the molds and a less-than fair curve. For the second one, I used a 5/8" thick oak batten on the forward half of the boat... that did the trick and pulled the planks into a nice fair curve. The after end is less troubling for the planks and I only have one thicker batten so I still used the spruce batten on that. Here's the work in progress:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2945/33474057010_1c9c78aa62_c.jpg

You learn as you go. My first plank gluing job was a real mess of epoxy everywhere and sagging fillets. On the second one I used this gizmo that I found at the local hardware/chandlery store. What a great time-saver and quality improver over a big syringe or a pastry bag. You just fill it with your epoxy putty/goop and use it with a construction glue gun. When you're done, there's no real cleanup... just let whatever small amount of epoxy is still in the end and in the nozzle harden, and the next day push it out the back with a rod. You can see the clump of hardened epoxy that came out of this one. Now it's ready to use again. Almost as good as sliced bread!

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2893/33072518693_87bc962237_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
04-11-2017, 11:51 PM
Planks are added at a ferocious pace... Tonight I finished fitting and gluing plank#4. Only one more pair of planks to go!

Singlehandedly maneuvering 16 foot planks that are 6mm thick is tricky, and I managed to have one break along the puzzle joint. Not a big deal, some new glue and glass tape on both sides of the break did the job of fixing it, but I did lose a couple of days waiting for that repair to cure. Anyway the repaired plank is in place. Over the weekend I cut proper planking-clamping battens out of some oak, 3/4" wide by 5/8" thick, enough to glue two 16-foot planks at a time, and switched to using 3/4" plywood backing blocks to screw into. That combo has got the planks "pulling" into a nice fair curve. And I've figured out how to keep the backing blocks out of the squeezeout, to make cleanup on the interior easier.

Here is plank #3 on:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2920/33602197790_ddf7341eb7_c.jpg

And then plank #4

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2894/33602198160_ee257a38ed_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
04-11-2017, 11:54 PM
I also convinced my 18 year old son to help with the plank gluing. It's phenomenally easier to get it right with 2 people. 2 people to position the plank = a lot less glue getting smeared around. 2 people clamping with one driving screws and one under the boat holding the backing blocks in place, works really well. My son has never been that interested in my building projects. Maybe that threat of not paying next year's college tuition if he didn't help me did the trick... :)

Clinton B Chase
04-12-2017, 08:35 PM
Looks great, Jim. Love the aft shots...shows the boats fullness and bearing aft. Will make for easy launching of the trailer and perhaps even some planing surface when sailing hard on a broad reach!

John hartmann
04-13-2017, 06:14 AM
Clint and Jim, is this build the first of the revised hull form? She has lovely lines. Really enjoying the build, Jim.

Clinton B Chase
04-13-2017, 08:17 AM
John, yes this is the MkII version. You can see she has a firmer bilge than the mkI. The pics are Jim Levang's built in Duluth, hull #1.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2894/33971289556_1e0d538085_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/TKVJQU)Calendar Islands Yawl (https://flic.kr/p/TKVJQU) by Clint Chase (https://www.flickr.com/photos/clintchase/), on Flickr

https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2914/33882970351_74db1b32c8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/TC85BZ)Calendar Islands Yawl (https://flic.kr/p/TC85BZ) by Clint Chase (https://www.flickr.com/photos/clintchase/), on Flickr

Larchmont Jim
04-13-2017, 11:07 AM
Thanks John H. I have gotten all kinds of great ideas on how to outfit this boat and special details to add from your log and posts and the video of you and Waxwing on OffcenterHarbor. She is a beauty! The CIY has some similar characteristics, in a lighter, not quite as traditional hull. I have been thinking for a while on how to do a tent and your Mk III is a great design. I'll be at SRR in July, hope to meet you there.

Clint -- not sure I will have the CIY done for SRR, but I'm working away with that possibility in mind. I would love to show it off! If not, my dory will be my ride for SRR.

Larchmont Jim
04-23-2017, 08:32 PM
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2880/33420618863_cb2497ea27_z.jpgSpring is here! And the opportunity to work with the garage door open, and take tools and timber outside to do other projects.

I took advantage of a weekend at home and a guest with some able hands to help me out to get the last two planks on. A great feeling to get "the whiskey plank" mounted. Cleaning up goop underneath the boat after gluing is NOT my favorite job!!! Trashed some work clothes, but that's why they are work clothes. The hull is starting to look pretty good:
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2828/34074415422_483ddb9c28_c.jpg

so a sip of whiskey is in order

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2922/33389669794_d54e201d8e_z.jpg

Mediocre weather on Saturday allowed me to rip my rubrails out of some Philippine mahogany I bought recently (18 foot board - no scarfing!). Good weather on Sunday allowed me to put a first coat of varnish on all my spruce spars and oars that I made in January:



https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2880/33420618863_cb2497ea27_z.jpg

I may get this boat in the water and sailing this summer after all!

Larchmont Jim
04-23-2017, 08:57 PM
Left to right on the spars:

hollow box-section boom - solid round yard - solid ovalized mizzen mast - squarish sprit boom for mizzen - 9'9" oars made from plans/patterns from CLC. All from sitka spruce. I used Minwax "Helmsman" varnish from the local hardware store for the first coat, it's actually pretty good stuff, but will switch to Pettit Captains Varnish to finish these. I like the darker color and it applies pretty easily.

The oars were already sealed in epoxy (except for the handles, those will get tung oil). I'm not sure whether that was a good idea or not. I wanted the blades epoxied for edge hardness, and had a little extra so covered the whole thing. It will make them a bit better sealed, but dents may cause water entrapment. It's a lot of extra work too. It I did not epoxy the spars.

Larchmont Jim
04-27-2017, 10:06 PM
How many clamps does it take to glue on a rubrail? As many as you own! In my case, I counted 53... Tomorrow I'll move the clamps to the other side.

I'm using Philippine mahogany for the rails. True mahogany would be nicer, but it's too darn expensive for this modest craft. I was surprised to see that it was cheaper than the sitka spruce (spars and oars) and western red cedar (floorboards) that I bought.

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2862/33502973663_d03f59f29a_c.jpg

Clinton B Chase
04-29-2017, 10:27 PM
I enjoyed my stop at Jim's to see the boat and his building space. Even as the designer, I was impressed with the volume of the hull!

I also took note of the building space...it is tight with only a couple feet all around except at the transom where there is a couple more. I always felt that kits lent themselves to small workspaces.

Jim's doing a great job and has hardly bugged me with questions, so I stopped by and bugged him. Thanks, Jim.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2862/33509751214_9e5ea8a92c_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/T49ezh)2017-04-29_11-26-04 (https://flic.kr/p/T49ezh) by Clint Chase (https://www.flickr.com/photos/clintchase/), on Flickr

Larchmont Jim
04-30-2017, 04:22 PM
So Clint stopped by on his way passing by New York to see how the boat is coming. I was amazed when he told me that this was the first time he had actually seen a Calendar Islands Yawl in the flesh... and he designed it! Shows the power of computer design (in the hands of a skilled practitioner).

Over the past few days I have gotten both rubrails and now the stem attached. The plans call for a laminated outer stem but I chose to just use two pieces of 3/4" stock scarfed in the middle. It worked, with generous amounts of epoxy putty to fill in for my less-than-perfect joinery between the stem and the hull.

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2813/34368218345_079982510c_c.jpg

BrianMCarney
05-01-2017, 08:21 AM
Looking good Jim! To think that when we did the mast, the boat was still just a strong back!

Clinton B Chase
05-02-2017, 08:12 AM
Jim, Nice work on the outer stem. I will be using your method on future kits...simple and plenty strong. What was your approach without the stem already there to fit the rubrails to?

Larchmont Jim
05-02-2017, 10:45 PM
Clint, my sequence was

1) When attaching each plank, extend the plank about 3/8" past the end of the inner stem
2) fill the channel between the planks (the front of the stem) with epoxy - I used squeezeout from each planking operation
3) when all the planks are on, fair the stem curve and make a flat/square face on the front of the bow, 3/4" in width
4) attach rubrails to the sheer planks, with rails extending about 2" in front of the plank ends. A 1 1/4"#10 bronze screw was beefy enough to pull the tenacious end of the rubrail up tight against the stem, plus zillions of clamps along the sheer
5) mark off the 3/4" width of the slot for the outer stem on the rubrails, and cut (carefully) along the plane of the where the outer stem sides will be with a Japanese saw to make the notch for the outer stem. Then cut to length and round off the fronts of the rails BEFORE attaching the stem
6) Use the pattern from the kit to check the fit along the curve, and your stem stock to check the slot width
7) Cut the pattern into two pieces with a scarf angle cut, to get decent grain orientation along each piece
8) Trace and cut the two pieces out of the stem stock
9) Dry fit the two pieces in place and shape as appropriate to fit the curve (that took a while)
10) Drill, screw and glue the stem pieces in place (including gluing the scarf joint, in place). With lots of goop to fill the gaps!

Here is the finished product. I think I will leave the rubrails and the outer stem bright, while the hull planks will be painted.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4193/33609102343_7c1a78a720_z.jpg

And here is the scarf joint. Not fine joinery, but still looks decent.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4156/33577345084_a8f46624f5_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
05-07-2017, 08:16 PM
Busy weekend working like mad in hopes of getting this boat ready for the Small Reach Regatta in Maine in July. My boat club opened for the season on Saturday -- oh holy day!!! But the weather was sketchy so I resisted the temptation to get out on the water in the kayak or the dory, and kept my shoulder to the wheel on the CIY build.

I got the skeg fastened & filleted on,

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4190/34521368095_4e1d72e4bb_c.jpg

and starting prepping for taking the boat off the strongback and flipping it over. Next weekend I have enlisted my son and a few of his friends for a boat-flipping party where we will pick it up off the frame, carry it outdoors, flip it over, and carry it back in. IOn the plans, Clint has included very handy cradle patterns for holding the boat right side up on the strongback using two of the in-place molds. So I got out the jigsaw and hacked out one of the cradles from a no-longer-needed chipboard mold. This is mold 2 looking forward:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4169/34521368505_1b5179005a_c.jpg

And traced the outline of the second one, frame 5 looking aft, and will cut it when we lift the boat off:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4167/33710825473_b7205cb50b_c.jpg

I also got the spars zapped with one more coat of varnish, got the boards for seats, inwales and floorboards planed to thickness (new Dewalt benchtop planer is a really sweet piece of machinery!) and got the first coat of paint on the dagger and rudder blade. I can almost smell the salt air...

Rich Jones
05-07-2017, 09:49 PM
Sounds like you're zipping along. Lots of work ahead of you, but the goal of the SRR can be an inspiration.

Larchmont Jim
05-19-2017, 06:33 AM
A flurry of activities last week and weekend -- signing an acquisition deal for a client, son's 18th birthday, Redsox game at Fenway, daughter's college graduation (!), Mothers' day -- meant taking a break from building. But 4 or 5 evenings this week of tablesawing, bandsawing, planing, routing, spokeshaving and sanding turned a board into this tiller assembly:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4224/33935240373_9ccf5df465_b.jpg

The wood is ash. If it's strong enough for baseball bats it should make a nice tiller. The tiller is hinged into the cheeks which bolt onto the rudder, so that you can flip it up and out of the way when not sailing and use the aft tank as a seat or part of the sleeping platform:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4183/33901972594_da32d98cb1_b.jpg

By flipping it up like this:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4268/34744416125_4c3c7d75ba_b.jpg

Larchmont Jim
05-29-2017, 06:16 PM
I had planned to flip the boat and finish the inside before flipping again to epoxy and paint the outside. But flipping requires more hands than I can easily round up so I'm going to go ahead and get the outside completely finished before flipping, and only have to flip it once.

After epoxying the hull it looked so nice I almost wanted to keep it bright...

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4249/34978087855_3acece05d9_c.jpg

But practicality prevailed. It's a boat, not a piece of fine furniture. After sanding the epoxy, applying 2 coats of primer (with more sanding) and rolling and tipping 2 coats of brightsides paint, it looks pretty good:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4267/34167356213_0f1f211bd7_c.jpg

The sheer strake will be painted red, to add a little accent (and visibility) to the otherwise haze grey (as in ... and underway) hull. Must be the former naval officer in me that landed me on that color.

Rich Jones
05-29-2017, 06:36 PM
Looking very spiffy.

Larchmont Jim
06-15-2017, 10:12 PM
Very slow going lately. Each coat of paint needs a day to dry and I haven't been able to get to it every day or even every second day. Anyway the hull is completely painted on the outside and ready to flip over. Rolling and tipping the Brightsides gives very nice results. I ran out of grey paint after two coats but it is pretty well covered. The red took 4 and there are still a couple of thin spots.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4250/35285910065_e599a7cd9e_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4285/35245658586_6a74ae8232_c.jpg

I also received my sails yesterday, a very nice set made for me by Douglas Fowler out in Ithaca NY. 121 sq ft for this small boat seems enormous, but I got the mainsail with 3 rows of reef points at 2-foot intervals so I should be able to adjust to any conditions.

Larchmont Jim
06-15-2017, 10:23 PM
And lest I forget, a whole set of cycles spent varnishing the big beautiful transom:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4233/35205447041_c2605c6acc_c.jpg

The transom is extra large because it extends very high ... the slot is where the tiller fits in. I won't get "pooped" by following seas in this boat!

A little of the red paint for the sheer plank added some character to my oars as well:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4259/34947617100_1051efb4c0_c.jpg

Clinton B Chase
06-16-2017, 07:07 AM
Jim, looks grand, love the red accented sheer...I love it when my customers do a great job.

FYI that boomkin hole is likely going to need a little rasping to get just the right fit.

galleywench
06-16-2017, 09:32 AM
Looks great, I love watching your progress.
I think you said you were using Interlux Brightsides; is it Kingston Grey?

Ed Armstrong
06-16-2017, 09:35 AM
Lovely!

Larchmont Jim
06-16-2017, 10:55 AM
Looks great, I love watching your progress.
I think you said you were using Interlux Brightsides; is it Kingston Grey?

Yes, it is Brightsides Kingston Grey and Fire Red. The red is a little brighter than I would ideally prefer but it still seems to look pretty good, and will certainly help make the boat visible.

Larchmont Jim
06-16-2017, 10:58 AM
Jim, looks grand, love the red accented sheer...I love it when my customers do a great job.

FYI that boomkin hole is likely going to need a little rasping to get just the right fit.

Thanks Clint. Question -- do you think it is important for the boomkin to be square-sectioned where it fits through the transom, or could I go with it round and just square off the tip of it that fits into the holding block on the aft tank top? Also, I am thinking that it should be a hardwood; I have some ash left over from making the tiller. If I use that stout wood, what diameter would be necessary?

Larchmont Jim
06-17-2017, 08:58 PM
A momentous checkpoint in the build process: today we lifted the boat off of the building frame and flipped it over so I can finish the inside. 6 of my kayaking buddies rallied to the task and helped me get the boat re-positioned. Thanks to Jean, Alex, Bea, Josh, John Andrew! Despite being pretty big, it is amazingly light, as we found when lifting and carrying it with six people turned out to be a piece of cake. I had cut cradles into a couple of the building frames (per Clint's drawing in the kit) which made it easy to drop it back in place right side up:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4198/34529441204_8b5fcc943c_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4207/34529441614_4ef58a15aa_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4268/35333021486_2aa5994cfc_c.jpg

Now I have my work cut out for me, for while it is looking pretty nice on the outside, the inside is a mess, with hardened epoxy globs and goobers everywhere. Out with the 60 grade sand paper and the flush-cut saw!

swoody126
06-17-2017, 10:12 PM
in addition to right side up have you considered a sling system so you can roll her up on her side(s) for creating horizontal surfaces out of vertical ones?

i do a similar thing when working on the insides of my dinghies(i even stand them on their butts)

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Rl85SmiFQJCiWbpKfFYWwbnyqOeTTn0xmBp41GSXGhE1nlLptG wcM-nW6WFqkbMX2Ow6f4DkOI5R8OgtExDxzJzl4soEO2ggWbMJRwPP Kb0NKBCKRpLnZZbQ5-b9wEP1G9m_FyGAz2lQoMaoFWnFXmk24yz06_KjdxfGdx23fm9Z sSZbTYH3AQE4fcKWWYU5ZvbUEa2mEWRbzOuFvSFIUjQPAdr5ji 3VYj6pKTQl0zujoRxb1CojEF--RVohV-E-9MJDSthupOxVtBSPiew7VUHpS8r1CN1O-_psLT6C--57HzJM_5tdL1FDUpxMCotLcl6GGZbFcON6wOVW8PUdTFlJpeqg r9LEHc432lRTMZLlqxuOxsU28JHAP159ht24_fi916uGy8Y57o X91VkGmNeF1mkIwKH6_AZusA5hEFVxpcN2ALSn24MHMwsBwKJ4 5YJSQ0WSPyeSIqigJ5B5De2zLX43o8BafclrCYlj5azvLMvfWv OcZnh5LoPhytWloxQwVu4u8EyoHigOyO6dkVnDgLHJBR6xg4pj _LIms4sQeiH6UHqfX0CaLtk5cUWcAxCkzTQ3E1DiuBnmeH_bJS iEcfgQ-WzCKRg7JCh4w=w480-h640-no

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/RTQRxehGkFONjGPxKQNrpvVtmOyaSysEikG5v5A-ZMLooLvogHcpgtXWd32Xckp5CVcngkozbKui-j2aRej78cNIQCHCf4nSi_Eeqh2NJoyBH1i3TEp2xGLPeiVMwdG bNPedA0OeFYFYnED01WodhLKN06U4ValPh5v5Jq-97Q04GizTBcZIeblQ1suPEjId3VgbFoOew4QEHzZLy53mKm3xK EAPEHtaoCS5dJKrns6ZI9uRC2Y9mI5R0I0OoDo3O4nB7VkDTG3 xghbKAnqlLLx4QJ3lgnZKeu8FlNv1fTYVZ_Uj_bNSx1KZsrOrN 82SdAyO7zggIyKnS1UjQaF357fNrwA5fgDkYPrj4N89lMxteTZ 9QQQACGgXTRyz5wqgFC59wJSCj8d1TX-nzpGdKtk3s7NJ--HIjNvNdoUfXOrwdzMkFCYkZoPGEpxgBeJ23mo_jFfmtNEGZxCI AyERvE_fbidEgZioDJc7KckhkhnkvzSF8H0SBSbH7s25bdIgwV cbLFc8t6iGaBAWW1y1uc3wqYov_NVnS2T8Bbulsndan55FLUaX QpmbFZznD31bEqT9qbtZyESvImj28jc8Q8CjYGYmZaSnTtQCPd iDuQ=w480-h640-no

my work tables are knee high and i can work from a mechanic's roll around stool or chair to ease the strain on this old man's back ;-)

LOVIN YOUR LITTLE GIRL

sw

Breakaway
06-17-2017, 10:14 PM
Looking good!

Kevin

Larchmont Jim
06-25-2017, 10:55 AM
Swoody, positioning the boat differently might help in leveling epoxy etc. but this is a 16-foot boat with 5'5" beam... not very practical for me to move it around while working solo.

Now I'm in the phase where as much as I work away the progress only glacially apparent. I spent probably 6 hours just cleaning up the epoxy mess on the inside. Lately I've been working on finishing the aft tanks, which requires a lot of cutting and fitting of cleats . Also installed the mizzen mast step, which is off center in this design so the tiller can swing on the centerline. This seemingly trivial little item still took a fair amount of time, because the corner it sits in has no right angles whatsoever:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4205/35357101932_21bd649bda_c.jpg

Here you can see it in the bigger picture. The center section will be a pretty big lazarette with a hinged top, and the outer sections are the two side tanks which will be sealed save for the circular access ports. I'll have to be over-generous with the epoxy to make sure the tops are filleted in air-tight.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4263/35524455605_aeb414fc1a_c.jpg

swoody126
06-25-2017, 11:18 AM
hey Jim, GOING WELL

i could not see the weep hole in the mast step in the pic

if it'z there, bueno

if knot, might oughta should make one, B4 you close that area in... ;-)

sw

Larchmont Jim
06-25-2017, 11:37 AM
A few more hours of work, a few more details. More of the cleats that the tank tops and mizzen partner will be glued onto:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4239/34686327104_19bec31cf3_c.jpg

Mizzen partner:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4253/35140874100_d1622cb77e_c.jpg

And tank tops and lazarette hinged hatch:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4290/34686327084_cd677c1ec3_c.jpg

Also this weekend I glass-taped the stitch-and-glue seams between the bottom panels and epoxy saturated the inside of the hull. Then I spent about 15 minutes scratching my head and pondering the plans trying to figure out why 2 of the the 3 pre-cut plywood floor 'timbers' fit just right but the third one didn't fit anywhere... I finally figured out that the middle one gets cut in half and in the slot in between the halves is where a hinged strut will hide when the floorboards are down. The strut, when hinged up, supports the floorboards when they are raised to form a sleeping platform.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4216/35360269882_33cd608d3b_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
06-28-2017, 07:07 AM
I am a bit bleary-eyed this morning after staying up way too late last night fitting one of the inwales, then cutting and fitting the breasthook and transom knees. The rail is just clamped in place for now, learning the appropriate bend. The Philippine mahogany will look nice for the rails and will be finished bright.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4210/35200434710_9407f03b6e_c.jpg

Lots of compound-bevel cutting for the breasthook... I did pretty well getting the sides angled properly, but screwed up the cut on the notches where the inwale inserts. Since the pattern I had made was for the top of the hook, and the bandsaw only cuts a bevel one way (so the pattern lines were actually drawn on what would be the bottom of the hook), I had to cut 1/8" wide of the pattern line. When it came time to cut out the notches, I had a "temporary mental apparition" (to quote O Henry) and cut an eighth on the wrong side of the line. I'll fill the gap with a splint of the same wood to hide my mistake. I am not going to bother with trying to crown the breasthook... the wood is only 3/4" thick and I don't want to make it any thinner, plus I would like to finish this project before the next decade and go sailing.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4218/35457172261_a644891bf3_c.jpg

The transom knees were easier, as there are no real curves there and I was starting to get the bandsaw-table-tilted thing figured out for cutting the bevel. And I'm choosing not to notch the inwale into these, just take it all the way back to the transom and glue the knee to the inwale. I'll probably put one long screw all the way through the gunwale into the knee, if not for strength then just to help with the gluing.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4280/35419175642_c5a78c9c58_c.jpg

Rich Jones
06-28-2017, 07:25 AM
Those quarter knees on the transom are perfect. Why not take another stab at the breasthook? It's not all that much work to make another and, once done, will be worth the effort.
I've trimmed out a few boats in Philippine mahogany and it does look great finished bright.

Larchmont Jim
06-29-2017, 05:53 PM
Those quarter knees on the transom are perfect. Why not take another stab at the breasthook? It's not all that much work to make another and, once done, will be worth the effort.
I've trimmed out a few boats in Philippine mahogany and it does look great finished bright.

Thanks Rich, you are overestimating my degree of perfectionism and understimating my impatience to get this boat built and out on the water! I think i can fill those little gaps with some of the same stock and with the grain aligned so that the patch will be almost invisible -- kind of like bunging a screw hole. It' a question of which test one is trying to pass - looks good at 10 feet, or 3 ft, or 1. I think that would pass the 3 foot test.

Falcon1
06-29-2017, 06:33 PM
You really have the pedal to the metal. Moving fast!

If you were to take another shot at the breasthook, watch the Caledonia Yawl build series on OCH. Geoff Kerr has a great tutorial on this piece of the boat.
I followed his instructions and was pleased with the result.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4265/35450834152_a4b1275190_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/W1EMUu)bow cleat (https://flic.kr/p/W1EMUu) by Michael Owen (https://www.flickr.com/photos/107084128@N08/), on Flickr

minuteman
06-30-2017, 06:03 AM
"I would like to finish this project before the next decade and go sailing."

Does the WBF have an official motto? I nominate this! I can picture it on coffee mugs and t-shirts.

Boat looks great.

Kenny

Larchmont Jim
07-09-2017, 06:35 AM
No progress on the CIY build over the long 4th of July weekend, since I was enjoying the holiday at Seneca Lake in New York's beautiful Finger Lakes region. I got lots of rowing in in my Dave Gentry-designed "Ruth" wherry, which is a joy to row. Plus it has the advantage of already being built. Yes, this is a file photo, as the astute would observe that there's no seaweed like this in fresh water:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2906/33099098773_03b8c0074a_b.jpg

Larchmont Jim
07-09-2017, 06:40 AM
Back to the task this weekend though. The rails are complete, along with quarter knees and breasthooks. They came out pretty nice.

Quarter knee:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4209/35681212051_a6f515f9c1_c.jpg

Breasthook:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4242/35772628536_2711323ea9_c.jpg

And the whole assembly:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4260/35644014152_b11ec129c8_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4254/35772628986_8ac83a2fcb_c.jpg

Plus I spent a lot of time yesterday sealing planks, seats, tank tops, pretty much anything that didn't move, with epoxy in prep for eventual painting & varnishing. A variation on the old Navy boatswain's mate's saw, "if it doesn't move, paint it, if it moves, grease it"...

Rigadog
07-09-2017, 09:09 AM
Beautiful!!

Falcon1
07-09-2017, 02:00 PM
Yes! Looking really nice.

WI-Tom
07-09-2017, 03:25 PM
I have a great fondness for this design, and you're doing a great job with the build. Looks beautiful!

Tom

Rich Jones
07-09-2017, 03:38 PM
Thanks Rich, you are overestimating my degree of perfectionism and understimating my impatience to get this boat built and out on the water! I think i can fill those little gaps with some of the same stock and with the grain aligned so that the patch will be almost invisible -- kind of like bunging a screw hole. It' a question of which test one is trying to pass - looks good at 10 feet, or 3 ft, or 1. I think that would pass the 3 foot test.
My latest boat is a true 18 footer. It's 18 feet long and looks great from 18 feet away. Get any closer and the defects start to show up...
Your breasthook solution came out just fine. On my steam bent coamings, I ended up having to slip in a 1/16" filler. It's next to invisible.

Larchmont Jim
07-09-2017, 08:51 PM
Yes Rich, the patch on the breasthook is only visible at 18 inches so I am feeling ok with it.

Today was a great day on the water -- kayaking in the morning, sailing in the afternoon. With some boatbuilding in between. Today I glassed the inside of the bottom plank and garboards forward of the midships bulkhead. The plans don't call for this but I thought that with only 6mm plywood on the bottom, a little extra strength couldn't hurt. Plus, this is where the mast step goes and the plans do call for 2 layers of 6-oz glass right under the step. So I just did the whole thing and two layers at the front end.

Masking tape at the edge of the plank makes it easy to cut the glass when it has semi-cured and peel it off, as you can see here with one side cut and one not yet:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4257/35017966783_9679a6c6e9_c.jpg

When done and with one fill coat of epoxy on, it looks pretty neat:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4256/35017966733_ea6b91a674_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
07-30-2017, 08:14 PM
Two weekends away, at Grey Fox Bluegrass Festival in upstate NY, then to Maine for the Small Reach Regatta. Since the CIY is firmly still in the building cradle, we took the dory up to the SRR. A good time was had by all, great weather, no fog, awesome. SRR at Pond Island, Blue Hill Bay:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4328/35989248651_0a10beae47_b.jpg

Now back to work. And work on the boat build. Two weekends of drudgery sanding, filling holes, more sanding, filling holes some more, filleting, and sanding. I tried this tape trick to keep the epoxy putty in the holes and not everywhere else. Masking tape with holes punched in it:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4318/35471410573_41f7efe9af_c.jpg

There were a whole lot of holes! The boat looked like someone who had had a really bad time shaving.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4295/35881644720_4a820cf302_c.jpg

Whether it saved me time or not, I'm not sure. Anyway with holes filled I proceeded to sanding. And filleting.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4308/36234492706_3d1a227df7_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
07-30-2017, 08:17 PM
A stabilizing plate has to be screwed glued and filleted to the front of the daggerboard trunk:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4298/36108753952_84e05b5a85_c.jpg

And after all that, the boat looks pretty much the same as it did 3 weeks ago. But I'm actually getting closer to launch date.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4295/35471411893_36defeabb7_z.jpg

johngsandusky
07-31-2017, 10:15 AM
The yawl is coming along nicely.
Is your dory in that pic? What design is it?

Larchmont Jim
08-01-2017, 06:32 AM
The yawl is coming along nicely.
Is your dory in that pic? What design is it?

My dory is indeed in the picture, but among the 40+ (!) boats on the beach, it's hard to pick out. It's a CLC "Northeaster" dory, a great boat. There were 4 Northeasters in the fleet, plus one of the larger CLC "Southwesters", an Oughtred "John Dory", a Swampscott dory built from John Gardner's plans, a traditionally built Swampscott sailing dory, and Clint Chase's "Deblois Street" dory. Here is mine (with the red pennant), along with a sister-ship.

Here it is, along with a sister-ship.

Larchmont Jim
08-01-2017, 06:32 AM
Photo didn't post:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4327/36080950686_c1fce8f8dc_b.jpg

johngsandusky
08-01-2017, 07:42 AM
Very nice, thank you. I was looking at a couple of NE Dories online, both sold before I saw them. I have since bought another 17' sailing dory.

Larchmont Jim
08-01-2017, 09:58 PM
Floor timbers are set in place with lots of goo... I have found that floor tiles left over from some long-ago renovation project are perfect for gravity-clamping epoxy jobs.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4401/36188564801_f95f0c5027_c.jpg

Clint says that he didn't intend these "timbers" which are really only 9mm plywood, to have any structural function, just to hold up the floorboards. However, I think that epoxied firmly in place they definitely stiffen the 6mm bottom plan and garboards, which I have left unglassed on the inside in this after section as per the plans:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4386/36156386182_de36915c14_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
08-06-2017, 11:34 AM
I finally got around to gluing in the last of the cleats to hold up the aft tank tops -- tricky because gluing to a curved surface and without any ability to apply direct clamping pressure. Indirect clamping did the trick, and the tank tops are now on and sealed/filleted.

Swoody, thanks for your hint on putting a weep hole into the mizzen step, I wouldn't have thought of that and would have created a potential rot spot.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4390/36267235971_5b9e18fced_c.jpg

Now I can see what the whole "poopdeck" looks like, it's a big surface area. Tanks on each side and lazarette in the middle with hinged top. I intend leave it bright, and all that wood will look really nice:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4334/35596221203_882a76c431_c.jpg

With that done I turned to milling and fitting cleats here there and everywhere... to hold up the floorboards, I used Philippine mahogany left over from the rails, since it will be semi-visible it should match the WRC floorboards in color:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4406/36403829335_b00ab6303e_c.jpg

And to strengthen the bulkhead that will serve as mast partner (and provide surface for gluing the forward tank top to) where I used big pieces of doug fir for strength.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4415/35568669144_06317dd630_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
08-06-2017, 09:28 PM
Adventures in clamping... since I finished the outside of the hull already, fitting out the inside takes some ingenuity to figure out how get all those cleats and things in place for gluing. You can't just screw it through the hull with a temp screw and fill the hole later.

For the bow tank cleats, which have a significant curve and a compound bevel, I decided to laminate them in place with three strips of spruce about 1/4" thick each. You can't get enough clamping pressure to bend a 3/4" piece with my indirect clamping trick shown below. Thanks Clint for the hint on how to clamp these!

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4429/36279289571_50f3d6e8a9_c.jpg

The knees for the side seats also presented a problem. I ended up screwing the knee to a long batten that straddled the aft and middle thwarts to hold the knees in place. Using a clamp amidships and some weights aft (nothing to clamp to there now that the tanks are in place), I was able to hold it in place vertically and apply a little bit of sideways pressure against the hull. Of course... dooh! I laid the batten on top of the tank instead of where the cleat will sit (lower by the width of the side seat), so I realized ex post facto that the knees are just a bit too high. Oh well, the bullnose plane will be put to work later to knock a little off of the tops of them.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4361/36370818606_a6d09ef42b_c.jpg

Clinton B Chase
08-07-2017, 10:23 AM
Clint says that he didn't intend these "timbers" which are really only 9mm plywood, to have any structural function, just to hold up the floorboards. However, I think that epoxied firmly in place they definitely stiffen the 6mm bottom plan and garboards, which I have left unglassed on the inside in this after section as per the plans:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4386/36156386182_de36915c14_c.jpg[/QUOTE]

I think this is a good call.

Larchmont Jim
08-10-2017, 10:40 PM
Workin' away this week... the theme of the week is seats. The plywood side bench tops that come in the kit are pretty flimsy, so I reinforced the underside with a 3/4"x3/4" stringer.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4397/36095903100_f5ae64b24b_c.jpg

The other 3 sides will be resting on cleats attached to the hull/bulkhead/knee, which I cut and glued in place:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4336/36095902890_5252f89cc1_c.jpg

The bow tank top from the kit was a pretty close fit without a lot of shaping, but still required some notch cutting and edge trimming.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4426/36446632776_93c67963e2_c.jpg

So the boat starts to look like a real boat with the thwarts/benches and tank tops in place... although I still have to glue and fillet the bow tank top in.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4381/36355417531_3a4f8ec47c_c.jpg

Clinton B Chase
08-15-2017, 10:48 AM
Looks great Jim.

Some of these details, like the stiffeners, if they were not called out or drawn in the plans, will be in the next batch!

Larchmont Jim
08-15-2017, 11:28 PM
Clint, I have to admit i haven't been following the plans very closely on this detail stuff. If it's not structural, i'm kind of winging it. So i dont even know really of some of these details are in the plans. For the mast step and partner, i will FOCUS on the plans closely. Also, the side benches will get some strengthening from the ledges that will be glued under the inboard edges to hold up the floorboards to make a sleeping platform. But i thought the hardwood reinforcement would still help.

Larchmont Jim
08-23-2017, 03:47 PM
I'm going through my punch list of all the little things that need to be done to finish the hull. It's still a pretty long list. I've now glued/laminated in place the forward tank cleats on the inside of the hull. So one thing on the list BEFORE gluing on the tank top is to put a bolt eye through the stem, which will be needed to secure the boat on the trailer. I got a 4" stainless bolt eye, which was long enough to bolt through the stem. Given that the plywood it is bolted through isn't very hard, i made a backing plate/ washer out of G10 for the inside of the stem, and sealed it with silicone:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4434/36295336120_490e6a19e6_m.jpg

And it looks OK on the outside of the stem.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4435/36552615541_b77e708dc5_m.jpg

Larchmont Jim
08-28-2017, 10:38 PM
The most awesome summer weather this past weekend, sunny and dry and in the 70s -- in NY in August! But other than a couple of hours on the Sound in the kayak, I spent the whole time in the shop working on this boat. Seems like misplaced priorities but I will admit it, I am obsessed. Or possessed maybe -- to get this boat finished!

I finally got the bow tank glued and filleted. I think that is the last of my serious epoxy work on this boat project. Yahoo! Gooey sticky epoxy gets old after a while.

Also got the mast partner fitted and now glued in place:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4427/36049646064_73aee08abd_b.jpg

The mast partner required a bit of thinking and tinkering but the arrangement I came up with, which is similar to the drawing in the plans but not exactly the same, looks plenty strong.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4351/36023337534_c9354809b5_b.jpg

It has bolts threaded through brass straps, the partner plate, the plywood tank top, an oak cross piece glued and screwed to the bulkhead, and more brass straps. Then a swinging oak gate is used to close the mast in. 5 of the 6 bolts stay in place, and the removable sixth one gets a wing nut, so when removed the gate pivots on the 5th bolt:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4401/36857932115_ace50b763d_b.jpg

And i got the mast step screwed (from underneath) and glued in place.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4403/36075339553_18151ea6b0_b.jpg

Next up is floorboards and side bench extensions, both of which are of solid wood. I cut the cedar stock for the floorboards this weekend and realized I bought about 15 feet less of 1x6s than I actually need :( Back to the lumberyard at some point.

MADOC1
08-29-2017, 07:46 PM
be back!

Larchmont Jim
09-10-2017, 09:39 AM
Progress continues slowly, interrupted by business travel and labor day weekend away from home. Still working on the details of interior fitout.

The side seats provided in the kit are cut from 9mm plywood but the extensions that take the seats forward to the middle thwart are not in the kit so I cut them from some 1x6 planks edge glued and planed to about 11/16" thick. Since the floorboard assembly is designed to be able to raise up to seat level to make a sleeping platform, you have to glue a ledge onto the underside of the plywood side seats for the floorboard to sit on. For the extension, I routered a ledge into the wood (left):

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4372/36329323673_5c7209fc3e_c.jpg

And here is the full bench seat
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4339/37143126315_d10efc45bd_c.jpg

I used cypress for the extensions. Then tried to stain it to make it darker to closer match the side seats.. It didn't really work. I'm not thrilled with the look here; someday I will probably replace these with mahogany or WRC to look better, but for now I just want to get the thing floating.

Between the ledges on the side and cleats on the bulwarks, there is a support for the floorboard assembly all the way around the perimeter. On the midships thwart it's a 3/4" square cleat. I had to router and chisel it about 9mm deeper where the side seat extension sits on it, since that's thicker than the ply seats. it would have been easier to just glue the cleat lower in this spot, but I didn't think of that ahead of time.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4394/36329323643_fcb73440d4_c.jpg

Cleats everywhere -- this one holds up the side bench extension and is screwed to the knee
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4339/36953987666_ed9dbd14ec_c.jpg

And I got all of the floorboards cut and planed. Western red cedar. Pretty straightforward until you get to the curved edge, which needs to be spiled to match the seat ledges and also still fit the hull. Not quite done on that but I'm pleased with the look. Per the plans, I'll screw the floorboards to tranverse cleats so that the whole thing is in two assemblies, one aft and one forward.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4432/37143126755_c552bcdfda_c.jpg

Let's see if this baby sees salt water before the winter comes on...

PhillySailor
09-10-2017, 11:53 AM
Jim,

It's really looking great! I'm a little behind you but coming along. Did the sills for the permanent side benches come with the kit? I can't find them or the cut sheet from the plans. I'm glad I've been following your build. The cleats for the side benches was giving me a headache as I was trying to get one piece for the whole thing and there was just too much bend in it. Using several small cleat pieces is much better. I'll probably do that in the bow tank, also. So, you're using athwartship cleats under the floorboards instead of the ones in the kit? I was thinking that the pieces included would attach and support the floorboards instead. However, I do see your point in that it'll strengthen the bottom there. It's a bit of a run between bulkheads there.

Thanks for posting and I'm glad I'm able to learn from your experiences!

-Nick

Larchmont Jim
09-11-2017, 10:54 PM
Nick, glad that you are making good progress too on your CIY! Although it looks like we won't be able to do our east coast CIY class rendezvous until next spring... To your questions:
- the sills didn't come with the kit, but I had enough 9mm scraps from the cutouts to get them from. I will suggest to Clint that he adds those to the CNC cutting file

- I didn't think of using several small cleat pieces for the bow tank. Maybe because I was thinking that you need a glue joint on top of the cleat the whole perimeter for air tightness. But you could probably do it that way as long as you have a good fillet all around the top edge. It WAS a little tricky gluing that continuous side cleat into the bow.

- since I used the ply floor timbers from the kit for floor timbers to strengthen the hull, and they will also hold up the floorboards when they are down, they can't also serve to hold the floorboards together for when you raise them to make the sleeping platform. So my additional transverse pieces are for that purpose. Also, you would have a hard time screwing all those planks into 9mm plywood edges, and it would also likely split the plywood. I think you should either (a) glue those plywood pieces in to the hull as floor timbers and then use other transverse pieces to hold your floorboard assemblies together, or (b) use them as patterns to cut combination floor timbers/sleeping platform transverse supports out of 3/4" hardwood stock, then screw your floorboards to those timbers and don't attach them to the hull. BUT getting the floorboards attached squarely was a little tricky even with nice flat pieces siting on the floor -- it would be REALLY tricky doing it to odd-shaped pieces.

Here is how I built the floorboard sections. Forward section: there is a 3/4"x3/4" cleat at the front and a 3/4" x 1 1/2" cleat at the aft edge. That's so 3/4" of the wider piece extends aft of the forward floorboard ends to make a ledge for the after assembly:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4371/36781177340_e1773d455c_c.jpg

Here it is raised into where it will be for the sleeping platform:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4373/37178650445_fc37bd4c59_c.jpg

I made a similar assembly for the after section. They meet at the same station as where the side bench knees are. Here is the aft section upside down so you can see the assembly:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4345/37178650315_77f726547e_c.jpg

Here's the detail of the "ledge" between the forward and aft assemblies. You can see how the aft one (left) sits on the forward one's ledge:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4425/36342028414_f1f8f2e8a1_c.jpg

I screwed the floorboards to the transverse supports for now. (That's about 60 bronze screws, glad I bought 100 of them!) I will go back and put some epoxy on and re-screw them once I get them fitting perfectly, since screws in soft cedar will probably loosen over time, also with only one screw in each plank (except the single wider middle plank) they could parallelogram on me which I don't want. The transverse supports are philippine mahogany which has a similar color, is pretty strong and takes glue well. It was left over from the planks I got my gunwales out of (not by design, just luck).

The final setup looks and fits pretty well:
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4427/36781177180_cd1f242899_c.jpg

I just need to cut the curved side pieces, which I saved for last so I can cut them to width (I already cut the outer curves of those 4 pieces using the side benches as patterns). By just starting this assembly from the center and keeping it symmetrical, I really didn't have to do much ruler measuring.

I also need to make the hinged strut (which will swing down from the 3/4"x1 1/2" transverse piece and thus hold up both assemblies as the sleeping platform. This platform idea is one of the coolest features Clint put into this design, and was a big selling point for me in selecting this boat, as it will allow me to camp aboard!

PhillySailor
09-12-2017, 09:03 AM
Jim,

Interesting solutions. One question would be if one would be able to glue the boards to the stringers or supports? Too little surface area to provide much lateral support? I was figuring I'd glue them since screws alone would eventually loosen, like you said, and then rack, right? Why did you make the floor in 2 sections? Would 1 single be too much to handle? I figured one would be able to angle it out from below somehow, after all, it's only slightly bigger than the opening. I suppose I could make 1 and if it doesn't come out easily enough, cut it into 2 pieces and go from there.

Unfortunately, I made the mistake of throwing out my marine ply scraps. Would you strongly recommend against using big box store birch ply for the ledge? Just a thought. A half sheet of 3/8" should be just about right I'd think. I do like what you did with the side removable benches. Using a solid piece makes sense, and then routing down or however needs to be worked to be flush with the side benches and rowing thwart. I may save both of those items until the very end.

I ended up putting the hatches on the top of both the fore and aft tank tops. However, I like the look of yours a bit better. I'd worry that access may be difficult on the deck like that. I'm not sure how often they'll be accessed, anyway.

We'll see. Next up for me is finishing filleting behind the stem and fitting the bow tank top. Thanks for adding the photo of the SS eye bolt. That reminds me, I need to order one. None of the ones locally available are welded and I think a bent one would just look bad.

-Nick

schoonerjay
09-12-2017, 09:16 AM
Hi Jim, thanks for sharing your build and thought process regarding your innovations! With respect to the mast gate/partners, I like that one of the six bolts has a wing nut to facilitate removal. Will you need a wrench to hold the head of the bold steady while turning the wing nut? Would a recessed hold cut to size for the hexagonal bolt head work to trap the bolt?

Good luck!

Larchmont Jim
09-12-2017, 10:18 PM
Schoonerjay, the gate bolt on the mast partner doesn't need to be more than hand tight with the wing nut, and the bolt itself is a bit tight in the hole, so I hope I won't need a wrench, although it's probably a good idea to keep such a wrench in the boat just in case. You can't recess the bolt because it has a brass plate under the bolt head.

Nick, the plans from Clint show (although maybe not very clearly) the floorboards in 2 sections. The building manual is clearer -- see figure 21. I think there are two reasons they need to be in 2 sections: 1) they have to be a tight fit on the ledges, which means that they are wider than the opening you need to lift them through. Thinking about the geometry, I don't think you could lift one great big floorboard section out. Maybe with some tilting and shimmying but it would be tricky. Not to mention that that is a big and somewhat heavy assembly to be lifting, and where are you going to sit in the boat while lifting it? (it's easy I'm standing on the floor of my garage and my boat is in its cradle, but that's not the real world condition). It's way easier to lift them out in 2 pieces. The after piece is still pretty big and ungainly. 2) I don't know how you would position the strut that holds up the sleeping platform, since you wouldn't be able to get at it under that big assembly.

If you don't have okoume ply left over to make the seat ledges, you could use birch ply but I think solid wood - mahogany or doug fir -- would look better and be strong enough. Depends on if you have a planer or table saw to cut it to a decent thickness.

I got my eye bolt via internet from Jamestown Distributors, since I couldn't find a good one locally either.

Larchmont Jim
09-12-2017, 10:21 PM
I finished the last of the floorboard planks tonight. The side planks are curved in multiple ways so it took some planning. Planing cedar is like cutting butter though -- very easy. Here is the whole assembly raised to be the platform. It's really big, a full 8 feet long x 5 feet wide amidships and about 3 feet wide even at the transom:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4349/37007441996_3c2f98a333_c.jpg

And here are the floorboards where they belong.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4409/37007442066_c999972e96_c.jpg

jimL55804
09-14-2017, 09:25 PM
If you need a little more inspiration to get through the build and get her on the water, here is a short video of CIY #1 on Lake Pepin earlier this summer:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcXF81HceCY&feature=youtu.be

Jim

Clinton B Chase
09-19-2017, 10:34 AM
Great progress! Jim thanks for posting your photo...glad you are still getting out in her.

I can't wait to actually sail one myself!

Larchmont Jim
09-24-2017, 09:38 PM
4 coats of varnish makes the wood look pretty good. I had a bit of a hiccup as the varnish I started with - Totalboat Lust from Jamestown Distributors -- ended up being unsatisfactory. It's very viscous and was hard to brush on. I had bought it because it said you could overcoat in an hour and a half with no sanding. But it fell into the category of "If it sounds too good to be true, it's because if probably isn't true"... By the third coat, the varnish needed thinning bigtime because it was getting impossible to spread out. The instructions say thin with xylene or toluene only. I thinned it with xylene, maybe too much, but it came out looking terrible, almost milky white. Out with the sandpaper to knock down that last coat. The other problem with no sanding -- independent of the varnish -- is that you end up amplifying the brush strokes. Which is exactly what happened. A 4th coat of Minwax Helmsman spar varnish from the local hardware store, after some sanding, has it looking ok:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4347/37269877532_53c7c94d1b_c.jpg

$20 a quart to boot. Here's the bow tank, looking quite nice

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4374/36589335524_d9e43519a0_c.jpg

I also oiled the cedar floorboards and re-stained the seat extensions a different, redder color to match better

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4418/37269877632_352911818b_c.jpg

It's almost bright wood overkill right now, but it will look a little more balanced when I paint the inside of the hull below the thwarts and the sheerstrake.

Larchmont Jim
09-30-2017, 08:20 AM
Painting is done! Not my favorite job but it sure makes the thing look good. I just stood there staring at it for something like 5 minutes this morning. The inside of the hull is painted with Pettit Easypoxy, "sand" color. I flattened it with their flattening agent so it wouldn't be too shiny staring me in the face. Now to start mounting oarlocks, lazarette hinges, bow chocks, pintles and gudgeons, etc. And I still need to make the boomkin.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4409/37361369146_fa1238f2d5_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4396/36738529893_6782bfe672_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4397/23556600888_25b220f5cc_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4392/36738529863_d2c41615b9_c.jpg

AJZimm
09-30-2017, 09:29 AM
Looking great Jim! Of course I’m partial to your hull color scheme having used the same for my boat.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

WI-Tom
09-30-2017, 10:40 AM
Looks like great work--getting close now. I think you'll really appreciate the daggerboard. I'm normally not a fan, but having been forunate enough to sail the prototype CIY with a centerboard, I'm convinced a daggerboard is the right choice for this boat for lots of reasons (low-ish boom, legroom in the cockpit, ease of moving from side to side).

Enjoy the fitting out--looks really good.

Tom

Clinton B Chase
10-01-2017, 05:54 PM
Nice Jim, you may be setting a Calendar-Islands-Yawl standard paint job!

Great work, thanks for posting.

Also, in response to Tom, above, the boom is really not that low, it's just that the builders of #1 cut the mast short to get it to fit inside the hull. In fact, I have the mast drawn at 16 1/2'...it could be 16' so it can be gotten out of standard Eastern White Spruce stock. I think #1 the mast was cut below 16', but I don't recall how much less.

I might add that SAND by Pettit is a favorite color. And also, isn't it amazing how paint helps break up the intensity of all that wood grain/color...compare to the photo in post #136

cmosheh
10-01-2017, 10:20 PM
What a beautiful job - and a lovely boat! Bravo!

Chris

BrianMCarney
10-01-2017, 10:23 PM
Looks great Jim. Sorry we didn't get out together this summer.

WI-Tom
10-02-2017, 02:32 PM
Also, in response to Tom, above, the boom is really not that low, it's just that the builders of #1 cut the mast short to get it to fit inside the hull. In fact, I have the mast drawn at 16 1/2'...it could be 16' so it can be gotten out of standard Eastern White Spruce stock. I think #1 the mast was cut below 16', but I don't recall how much less.

Clint,

yes, I had forgotten the mast was shortened on the prototype--thanks for the reminder. Another 6-8" inches of mast height vs. the prototype would make a big difference for sure. I think I'd still prefer a daggerboard, though, for the increased openness of the cockpit. It looks very inviting with no centerboard case in the way of the helmsman's seating.

Lovely boat--I really like it. Of course, I really like the look of Drake, too. Maybe someday...

Tom

WI-Tom
10-04-2017, 11:32 AM
Also, in response to Tom, above, the boom is really not that low, it's just that the builders of #1 cut the mast short to get it to fit inside the hull. In fact, I have the mast drawn at 16 1/2'...it could be 16' so it can be gotten out of standard Eastern White Spruce stock. I think #1 the mast was cut below 16', but I don't recall how much less.

I wanted to follow up on the mast height issue I mentioned--Clint is completely correct. According to the text/captions of the review I wrote of the prototype boat, that mast measured 14' 11"--so, WELL under the designed 16' 6" height the plans specify. No wonder the boom felt low!

Clint, I apologize if I have mislead people with my comments. They were relevant to that particular boat (the prototype), but NOT to the CIY design itself. I suspect with a 16' 6" mast it would have felt fine to me, even though I'm tall-ish (6' 2"). In fact, re-reading the SBM review article, I'm reminded of just how closely the CIY fits my own dreams for a perfect cruising boat.

Hope that clears things up. I'll try to be more careful with comments in the future.

Tom

Clinton B Chase
10-06-2017, 07:16 AM
No worries, Tom.

Larchmont Jim
11-01-2017, 10:06 PM
Since my last post on September 30, I have had to abandon any idea of getting the CIY in the water before the sailing season is over... The good side of that was it let the pressure off to be building, which allowed me to get a number of beautiful not-even-fall days on the water sailing my CLC dory and rowing my Dave Gentry "Ruth" wherry.
Now that the docks are pulled from my boat club, the dory is on a trailer in the driveway, and the Ruth is sitting... well, on top of the CIY in the garage (note the Pygmy Arctic Tern hanging in the overhead -- this one-car garage is now a 3-boat garage:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4464/37394726474_c783157d3a_c.jpg

So the building progress has been miniscule. Next up was building the boomkin. The plans suggest you could use an ordinary closet hanging bar, which would be easy. I was intrigued by the elegance of John Hartmann's hollow boomkin on his Ilur, and while I'm not willing to go to the trouble of doing a birdsmouth as I think he did, I came up with a pretty easy method: I milled 2 pieces of ash to 5/8" x1 1/4", then cut a maybe 5/16" channel in each one to make a square hollow when they are put together. Here are the two pieces:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4445/38050108476_125062cbf2_m.jpg

And here they are gluing up. The rope in the middle was put there to be able to hopefully swab out any epoxy squeezeout

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4453/37394726094_063d46bf7a_c.jpg

Then I cut a "tenon" on the inboard end to about 7/8" square with the bandsaw, did the standard 8-siding and rounding of the outboard part, did some head-scratching compound angle cutting to make it fit the transom, and voila, a nice boomkin:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4456/38103551091_9d8606b4e5_c.jpg

The mizzen sheet will be led through the boomkin to a jam cleat mounted on the afterdeck. Here is the detail of where the "tenon" meets the square hole in the transom
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4493/24251142218_03727fd09d_c.jpg

galleywench
11-02-2017, 06:28 AM
Since my last post on September 30, I have had to abandon any idea of getting the CIY in the water before the sailing season is over...

Looks awesome great job. I've just came to the same conclusion with my Campion build. I had really hoped to launch the same year the build started, but the weather is really starting to turn here and there just isn't any need to rush to get the boat in the water. I don't really want to get to used to the boat knowing that if I capsize, the water is cold enough to kill (I don't have a dry suit).
From the looks of it, I'm just about where you are (finishing up the boomkin) and cobbling all the little bits and pieces together. I like you hollow boomkin arrangement, I originally planned on doing a birdsmouth, but got lazy and just glued up a solid piece. If I had known I wasn't going to launch, I would have taken my time and thought throw a method like yours. Nice work.

Clinton B Chase
11-02-2017, 07:51 AM
I think these boat projects are very intensive and are supposed to be FUN!!! So, Jim you made a great decision. The great thing is that you started and are almost there...many people don't even start and I am one. If I can settle into my business enough I will finally build a boat again for myself. I can't wait.

I give myself credit for the hollow boomkin idea. John built his ILUR from my kit and I said, "you know what would be a great idea"...and he did it in spades. Jim, your idea takes it further...no need to go birdsmouth here. I plan to incorporate your idea! Thanks!

David G
11-02-2017, 09:01 AM
It's fun for us lurkers to see a build chronicled. Sure is a pretty design, Clint.

Larchmont Jim
11-05-2017, 02:13 PM
Here is a little more detail on the boomkin arrangement. The boomkin is cut square on the inboard part and fits through a square hole in the transom. It's actually a little larger than 1" square. The outside diameter of the round part came out at just over 1 1/4". It flexes a bit under a load, so I hope it is strong enough. But the mizzen is tiny, something like 18 sq ft, so it shouldn't pull very hard.

It took a little careful chiseling to get the "shoulder" to sit flush to the transom:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4457/38194214781_4f4f61d470_c.jpg

I cut a little socket for it to fit into, and epoxied onto the tank top:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4450/38162008052_ec700df357_c.jpg

The boomkin is held in place by dropping two copper nails into holes drilled into the socket and the boomkin end. They are not very large nails, but they really shouldn't take any load -- the transverse and vertical loads are taken by the socket itself, and the tension on the mizzen sheet should pull the boomkin forward against the transom. So the nails only prevent it from loosening aftwards. They can be easily removed when it's time to unship the boomkin. (Got that idea from Geoff Kerr's video series on building a Caledonia Yawl on Off Center Harbor; he used that trick to hold the tiller into a mortise in the rudder. That series was invaluable for me to learn enough techniques and tricks to be well equipped for this build).

A jam cleat screwed to the tank top holds the mizzen sheet which is reeved through the inside of the boomkin. Since the tank tops are thin (6mm) I screwed the cleat into a backing plate made out of some 9mm ply scrap and glued to the underside of the tank top.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4540/26417327179_def3fa387d_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
11-07-2017, 11:31 PM
With no crunch on to make a launch date now, I can do little details at my own leisure. Tonight's addition: tie-lines below the gunwales.

I figured out with my CLC dory that one little drawback of glued lapstrake boats is that the hull has no place to tie lines into. No gaps between ribs and planks at the lap. So unless you build a spacered inwale, you've nothing to tie your binoculars, radio, knife etc. to. In my dory I ended up drilling some holes into the tops of the frames. I started with that idea here and then realized I could run a line through those holes instead and have a continuous line to tie or clip things into, all along the hull. I made some padeyes and glued them to the sheer plank, then ran a line through all that. It ties off to a cleat screwed to the underside of the quarter knee so I can put some good tension on it. I used traditional colored twist line which blends nicely with the wood:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4578/38224699622_df4e192801_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4580/24385339988_d43f43d80b_c.jpg

Clint says he designed the lazarette to fit a big fender that can be used as a beach roller. I found that, just by dumb luck, my Rocna 13-lb anchor fits perfectly into it - with about a half an inch to spare. This is truly fortunate because that anchor is a very odd shape and not something I would want kicking about in the boat where I could stumble on it.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4561/38201741136_6ed1237293_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4554/38201741426_8c2cf58cc1_c.jpg

Falcon1
11-08-2017, 07:09 AM
Great work! Thanks for documenting this so nicely. I'll be referring to this in the future for sure.

Mike

swoody126
11-08-2017, 07:38 AM
MY COMMENTS ARE IN BLOCK CAPS FOR SEPARATION NOT SHOUTING


...

PAD EYES/TIE LINE ARE A GOOD IDEA AND YOU DUNN A REAL WELL JOB OF IT!

Clint says he designed the lazarette to fit a big fender that can be used as a beach roller. I found that, just by dumb luck, my Rocna 13-lb anchor fits perfectly into it - with about a half an inch to spare. This is truly fortunate because that anchor is a very odd shape and not something I would want kicking about in the boat where I could stumble on it.

YES, ANCHORS NEED TO BE OUT OF THE WAY AND SECURE

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4554/38201741426_8c2cf58cc1_c.jpg

YOU MIGHT GIVE SOME THOUGHT TO LAYING A PIECE OF TRUCK MUD FLAP UNDER THE ANCHOR TO PROTECT THE HULL AS YOU ARE GOING DOWN THE ROAD. THE BOUNCING & JIGGLING WILL CAUSE THE HEAVY METAL TO ATTACK THE WOOD :-(



sw

WI-Tom
11-08-2017, 03:53 PM
MY COMMENTS ARE IN BLOCK CAPS FOR SEPARATION NOT SHOUTING

I generally put the anchor in the car for trailering, along with just about everything else besides spars/oars.

I've used lines under the gunwale for tie-ins on all my boats, too--works great.

Tom

robm
11-08-2017, 04:02 PM
The same comments about the anchor apply when using her in a chop.

Larchmont Jim
11-08-2017, 08:40 PM
I like the idea of a sturdy rubber mat under the anchor to protect the hull. I will also glue in some padeyes so that i can strap the anchor down tight so it doesn't bounce around while underway. And I think putting it in the car while trailering is a prudent idea. Thanks for the suggestions!

Next up will be to install strap-down padeyes on the inside of the hull for securing drybags and fenders. I have found in my dory that strapping them down low and tight in the boat makes them good ballast and also good flotation if I should ever swamp. Even good things to sit on. Also since they are immobilized and not hard-edged, they help calm down the bouncing of the boat when towing without causing any wear or abrasion on the hull.

Larchmont Jim
11-11-2017, 11:45 AM
More details...

I have found that webbing straps with plastic side-release buckles are the best way to secure gear into the bilge or the sides of the boat. Much easier to strap things down tight than with a line, no knots to tie, and can be released with one hand. So I made about 36 of these wooden strap padeyes:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4585/38250006276_ce16fe374f_c.jpg

And after varnishing and/or painting them, I am busy epoxying them into key spots in the boat, like under the side benches...

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4537/38250005976_85af831c30_c.jpg

Where they are perfect for securing drybags:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4559/26530334579_c9594288c3_c.jpg

I've gotten all of the after ones in, still need to do up forward.

swoody126
11-11-2017, 12:07 PM
consider this method of securing gear STOLEN ;-)

sw

Larchmont Jim
11-11-2017, 11:07 PM
Today's job was making a cap for the daggerboard trunk, to keep me dry while rowing. I looked for some pieces of wood around the shop that would work, and found some ash and oak that fit the bill.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4566/24478139408_fd4b30916b_c.jpg


https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4541/24478134068_de33ebe317_c.jpg

I'll have to decide whether to varnish it or paint it to match the hull and trunk.

Breakaway
11-11-2017, 11:51 PM
Looking good, as does your entire build!

I vote paint for the cap.

Kevin

hawkeye54
11-13-2017, 08:57 PM
Just a suggestion, post 150 / 152 , how about a perforated rubber doormat cut to fit under the anchor, would keep it quiet while also permitting some ventilation and drying while underway

Rick

Mike J
11-13-2017, 11:09 PM
Great work Jim! I also built a hollow boomkin for my Fulmar after seeing John's build thread. I'm convinced there's no way my boat would have come out as nice without all the build threads and ideas I've found here. Thanks for posting and I'm going to borrow the pad eye idea for my next build.

Mike

Larchmont Jim
11-16-2017, 11:01 PM
More fit-out details: tie down points in the forward part of the boat. The double padeyes allow me to strap something in the center and also stuff on the sides using the same padeye as one side of each lashing.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4537/37587418175_9e433b689c_c.jpg

It took a little trial and error to find where the daggerboard would sit nicely and out of the way, then a couple of padeyes and a strap keep it tied in nicely to the port side of the hull. Another strap secures the daggerboard into the trunk or (as seen here) the daggerboard trunk cap in place:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4571/26698518739_d00dd78ea6_c.jpg

I pondered what color to paint the daggerboard and decided that the only time you would see it was when it was stowed in the hull, so I painted it to match the inside of the hull. The other idea was that it would not scratch a different color paint onto the light-colored hull this way.

Falcon1
11-17-2017, 10:30 AM
I like those padeyes! How did you glue them? Was it just epoxy and masking tape?

Nice work!

Mike

Larchmont Jim
11-17-2017, 08:13 PM
Yes, just epoxied in place. I used a chisel to remove the paint and glass where each padeye would make contact so that I would have a good wood to wood joint. Then some unthickened epoxy on each face. Then pretty thick epoxycellofil paste to stick them in place. If the paste is thick and sticky enough, it will hold them in place even without clamping or tape.

stromborg
11-17-2017, 08:58 PM
Giving yourself the winter to add all these (very nice) finishing touches will pay off next spring.

Larchmont Jim
11-18-2017, 04:38 PM
Giving yourself the winter to add all these (very nice) finishing touches will pay off next spring.

Yes, having time to dabble in all these little details is actually kind of nice. Come springtime all i will need to do is rig the sails and go.

stromborg
11-18-2017, 06:21 PM
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4456/38103551091_9d8606b4e5_c.jpg

I built a hollow boomkin for Marianita and have found that the exit for the sheet has a lot more friction than expected. I simply put a big round-over in the end, it is still a tight corner and in light air the boom doesn't swing as freely as I'd like. I am pondering whether it bothers me enough to retro fit a more slippery eye of some sort in there this winter.

Clinton B Chase
11-20-2017, 07:39 AM
I believe John Hartmann rigged a low friction end on his boomkin...perhaps delrin?

John hartmann
11-20-2017, 08:09 AM
I believe John Hartmann rigged a low friction end on his boomkin...perhaps delrin?



My boomkin end was turned from a bit of hop hornbeam, Ostrya virginiana—locally called “ironwood” :
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20171120/41d18bbcd55fb52c0d20227b77513085.jpg

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20171120/fb290afc80545c998871cae904117c24.jpg

My initial experiments on the bench, with the mizzen sheet exiting the boomkin without some sort of bushing allowed the sheet to saw into the softwood......the hornbeam is 4 seasons on, with no sign of wear. I believe Tim Yeadon used an UHMW plastic bushing as the end piece of his hollow boomkin on the Hvalsoe 18 prototype.....


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Larchmont Jim
11-20-2017, 10:45 PM
John,

I have studied your build log closely and got a number of good ideas from it. It really is a valuable resource. And the CIY is similar to the Ilur yawl in a lot of ways. I think of it as the illicit love child of when an Ilur got it on with a Goat Island Skiff... Clint, is that the genesis?

GIS = flat bottom/hard chine, real easy to build; Ilur = big buxom hull, lots of narrow planks , uber-traditional; CIY = somewhere in between with a flat but narrow bottom panel instead of a keel, a lighter weight hull with less rounded bilges, simpler to build than an Ilur in terms of the number of planks and the amount of interior furniture.

One of its appeals to me however was that Clint designed it to have a lot of the same functionality, and a similar layout, but in a lighter weight which should mean a more solo-manageable boat, which was appealing to me. (More manageable wrestling it on a beach and onto my floating dock, not necessarily sailing it.) And another difference is that Clint spec'd a lot of it in plywood parts where the Ilur calls for solid wood. So for example the sternsheets/lazarette cover and the side benches are ply -- a lot less patternmaking, planning, jointing and shaping.

Additionally, I don't have the woodworking skill nor some of the tools you have to do the amazing details that you have done! So I've gone with the slightly easier but less elegant approach on some things. For example the boomkin I made was a simple box-section rather than birdsmouth, and I'm hoping that since I made the whole thing out of ash, which is reasonably hard, that the rounded over hole in the end will be hard and slick enough to handle the sheet going through it. We'll see...

If I make it to SRR next summer maybe we can see how its speed stacks up to the Ilur and the Goat! I know that my CLC dory got eaten alive by Waxwing last summer (day 2, on the close reach across Blue Hill Bay to the Blue Hill Bay lighthouse at the end of the afternoon, you just walked right by us).

John hartmann
11-21-2017, 05:56 AM
Jim, thanks for the kind words about the thread, and Waxwing....I’m glad my experiences are a helpful resource for other builders. Don’t underestimate your building skills—you are doing a great job with the CIY, and you’ve hit on a number of elegant solutions to many of the little choices that present themselves on a long and complex project.
Maybe Clint can speak to the design ideas, but my own sense is that the Ilur was one of Vivier’s early sail and oar designs, and so a logical starting point as Vivier began to explore the capabilities of CNC kit production.....many of the newer CNC designs like the Calender Islands Yawl, or Vivier’s Kernic or Jewell seem to incorporate the stitch and tape “skillet” with glued lap topsides....a pattern I suspect may reflect the designers evolving sense of what the optimally efficient build program of a CNC kit should be.....
By all means, bring this boat to Brooklin next summer!

Clinton B Chase
11-22-2017, 10:42 AM
The design genesis of the CIY is interesting. The design started as an 18'8" daysailer with a coaming and nearly 6'6" beam. That was before my love for sail & oar boating really kicked in...I was mostly a sailor, then rower, then found these boats that combined the two in a wonderful way. So when Christophe approached me and said, "Hey, man...can we find a boat as awesome as the GIS that I can still solo and sail fast but better in chop and row nicely and be as functional as the GIS without too much complexity?". I thought about it and wondered what would happen if, after scaling down the 18'8" model to 15 1/2' LOA, we might have something. Also, my first little boat that I built was a Shellback and I always thought a big Shellback would be awesome. A few years of working with Vivier had a huge, huge impact as did building a lot of boats, mostly with people. So the CIY was reinvented at 16' and the mkI was built by Jim Levang in MN. But after hearing some feedback and a little gut work, I decided to firm up the bilges and shuffle the interior, dropping a couple frames and having the aft quarters be buoyancy and the middle a lazarette. The firmer bilges gave some more displacement too, which is good. One thing about a light displacement 15 1/2' boat is when you load it up she loses too much freeboard. The firmer bilges I think will be a good thing for standing up to gusts, too. Hopefully it doesn't hurt light air performance much because that was one thing that I was surprised by in the launch of the first boat...it ghosted along very well....but the gusts were a bit much for the slack-ish bilges.

Jim has been great in sorting out detail stuff and the other builder in PA, Nick, is a first time builder so that has been great to see that the CIY is doable for a first timer.

John, I like the stitch and glue "skillet" term....been trying to think of a good one!

Larchmont Jim
11-24-2017, 09:33 PM
In today's episode of "Pimp My Ride (/Boat)", we continue with the embellishments.

I had finished the floorboard assembly a while ago, except for the strut that holds up the floorboards when they are raised to the sleeping-platform position. It's hinged to stow under the floorboards...

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4557/37733626415_3a516d91f0_z.jpg

Then flip up to vertical to hold up the sleeping platform:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4562/24749450328_caf0448da3_z.jpg

That photo is the forward set of floorboards. The after set sits on the ledge formed by the athwartship beam. The strut just pivots on a stainless steel bolt between two little side cheeks screwed and glued to the floorboard assembly.

I found I needed a handle to be able to lift up the after floorboard, so just strung a loop through a couple holes drilled in the cross-piece:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4566/37733630285_ed11506271_z.jpg

The platform is positively luxurious, it's so big... or at least it seems so to me. My wife says it's not quite her kind of luxury.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4542/38621942751_79154e0658_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
11-24-2017, 09:42 PM
More accoutrements... in the photo of the sternsheets and the sleeping platform you may notice a compass mounted on the lazarette top. When you're rowing, you need a compass the oarsman can see. But when you're sleeping on that platform, the compass would be a bit more of a bulge than "the princess and the pea" had problems with. Not to mention that when you're sailing you need a compass forward. So I borrowed another idea from John Hartmann, the bungie-mounted compass. Here it is up by the mast partner for sailing.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4526/37733627375_b30c5f35e1_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
11-24-2017, 09:59 PM
Even more pimping ... wait till you see the hydraulic lifters and the moving purple LEDs around the gunwale!

Lots of details up in the bow. Here you can see my rig for stowing my second anchor for cruising: a dishtub to hold the line and chain and hold the anchor off the deck. A screw-eye into the stem into which I can attach the anchor with a carabiner. And a couple of strap padeyes strategically located on the deck to allow for strapping the anchor down tight and immobilizing it. Seems to work well, but is also easily freed -- I can unhitch it with one hand. When I'm just daysailing, I'll leave the big Rocna at home and stow this Danforth in the lazarette.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4516/37733628515_9afc766233_z.jpg

But there's more going on here. You may ask, why are your oars hanging out over the bow like some kind of double-vision bowsprit, and how on earth are you going to row from there Jim? Well, Clint recommends 9.5 to 10 foot oars for this boat -- (it is 5'0" between the oarlock sockets). I made my oars 9'9" long. There isn't any good place to stow them in the boat without losing seating space.

But I found that I could wedge the blades of the oars on top of the rowing thwart, up against the middle frame, and cradle them in these extra oarlocks mounted on the gunwale up forward, and keep them out of the way -- not losing any of that nice seating that the boat has. I would like to claim that it was brilliant planning, but it was just dumb luck that the oar blades are just about exactly the same width as the distance between the thwart and the inwale, so they wedge in there nice and snug.

I glued some retainer blocks about 3/4" inboard of the hull to hold the side of the oar blade in place. With them wedged in their and tied down tightly to those forward oarlocks, they don't move.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4556/38626275931_d5614861c1_z.jpg

I'm rather pleased with this arrangement.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4516/37739733485_2003e1d718_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
11-24-2017, 10:11 PM
The details never stop -- here is my simple but proven rig for leashing oarlocks to the boat (since it's been scientifically proven that they don't float if you drop them overboard) on a boat without a spacered inwale to tie stuff to.

A small block glued to the inside of the hull, with a 1/4" hole drilled in. A light line tied to the oarlock, passed through the hole, and kept in place with a slip knot that won't fit through the hole. When you want to remove the oarlock, just slip the knot.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4535/26850106829_82a1156eab_z.jpg

To tie the oars into these forward "cradles", I thought about using bungees but ended up just using some cotton light line. It has a lot of friction so even a bow knot pulled tight will not come undone when you don't want it to. I drilled a 1/4" hole in the hull plank just below the gunwale, so it's basically invisible, and passed the line through it. The line has an overhand knot on each side of the plank to keep it from running away.

And yes, even though I haven't leathered my oars yet, I checked where the leathers will go and there will be leather at the part of the oars where they sit in these cradles.

Enough detailing for a day. Today I think I glued my 35th piece of wood to the inside of the hull to tie things to or reeve lines through. That was a lot of cutting, shaping, sanding and varnishing/painting (since I finished them all before gluing them in). Time for a cool refreshing adult beverage!

Alan H
11-24-2017, 11:54 PM
I finally spent a long while reading through this. You are doing a knockout job, but I'm quite taken by your boomkin/sheet idea. I'm stealing it!

Larchmont Jim
11-26-2017, 03:24 PM
I took advantage of my son being home from college for Thanksgiving, to finally hang the rudder. He has never been particularly interested in helping me build but will do so when I really need his extra hands. This was definitely a two-man job, but with four hands it went on pretty easily. The boat is looking almost done!

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4560/38593591612_4078a74507_z.jpg

I was thinking the tiller might be too short -- it seemed so sitting on the workbench, even though it is exactly to the plans. But now that I can sit in the boat and check it out it seems perfect.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4533/37908657744_61946cf206_z.jpg
Clint has designed the tiller with two bolts holding the tiller in the cheeks. The forward bolt uses a wingnut so you can remove it and pivot the tiller up and out of the way for when camping or having cocktails for 6 in the cockpit (and to get into the lazarette):

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4562/37774555135_5c3c510886_z.jpg


One thing I realized once the rudder was fully installed is that to remove it, you can't just lift it off the gudgeons. The tiller-through-the-slot-in-the-transom arrangement prevents that. I think I will need to fit the two bolts that hold the cheek assembly to the rudder with wingnuts also, because I will want to remove the rudder pretty much every time I go sailing, I will keep the boat on a floating dock the rest of the time and don't want the rudder hanging out there.

cmosheh
11-26-2017, 05:58 PM
John,


If I make it to SRR next summer maybe we can see how its speed stacks up to the Ilur and the Goat! I know that my CLC dory got eaten alive by Waxwing last summer (day 2, on the close reach across Blue Hill Bay to the Blue Hill Bay lighthouse at the end of the afternoon, you just walked right by us).

I certainly hope you do make it to the next SRR with your beautiful CIY. Meanwhile, let's not worry about the GIS! That skiff should easily sail away from most of the heavier boats simply because it'll be on a plane quickly and leave heavier boats in the rear view mirror (as it were). With that narrow hull and hard chine it should be able to run circles around most of the typical SRR boats. If I had a GIS it would be equipped with high-end hiking straps. :) and some form of padding on the gunwale :) :) This might sound strange but the GIS somehow strikes me like a lower-budget Thistle for small boat builders... obviously totally different other than it'll sail away from most anyone else other than perhaps a Flying Dutchman (not even talking about skiffs with gennakers)

The CIY does not strike me as a boat intended for planing (Clint might want to chime in here). So, being lighter, the CIY might have an advantage of us Ilurs. Of course it carries less canvas so that's an obvious factor. Ilurs and CIY's might surf given perfect conditions but (John: correct me if you know otherwise) planing is not an intended part of Ilur package.

Looking forward to see your finished boat! Happy Thanksgiving!
Chris

Larchmont Jim
11-26-2017, 10:46 PM
The sail plan from Clint says 121 sq ft, with a 105 ft main and a 16 ft mizzen. I had my sails made by Douglas Fowler in Ithaca NY; he seems to have leading market share among the SRR crowd, which was a good endorsement, plus I had met him when I had him add some reef points to my CLC Dory sail (also made by him). My wife and I have a summer shack on Seneca Lake in western NY which is just 25 miles from Ithaca. Douglas said he didn't follow the sail plan exactly, although he did put roach into the mainsail as specified in the plans and 3 sewn-in battens along the leach. It's a pretty high aspect sail and, with the hull at only 175 lbs, seems monstrous to me. Compared to an Ilur at something like 300 lbs, I think the CIY should be quite a bit more "powered". Therefore reefing will be frequent, so I had Douglas put in 3 sets of reef points at 2-ft spacings. Don't know how the sails will look rigged but here they are on the front lawn:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4539/37951842884_1b55e715c0_z.jpg

The bottom of the CIY is close to flat in the center of the boat, and carries a lot of area pretty far aft, so the boat might plane in just the right conditions... we'll see. I worked this weekend on installing a hiking strap, as I like to sit out on the rails.

Larchmont Jim
11-26-2017, 10:54 PM
Another little project this weekend was making cleats. The kit came with black plastic cleats, and if I had been successful in getting the boat into the water this past season it would undoubtedly have had those installed. But since I have until May to fit it out, I'll use brass cleats (anchor and mainsheet) and hardwood cleats (halyards). So the plastic and brass made good patterns for making wood ones.

Here are a few. In the foreground, two are made from some insanely hard tropical wood whose identity I know not. These were cut out of the spreader bar for a hammock swing I bought in Nicaragua a few years ago. (Yes the red and the blond one both came from the same piece of wood, only inches apart). After 3 years hanging from a tree in my backyard, the hammock net was rotten but the wood was still in pretty good shape. And it looks the same as the wood we were trying to frame a house out of in Nicaragua, that was so hard it literally bent nails. I think it will be good for cleats.

The 3 in the background are from some oak (red I think) salvaged from a house we recently renovated. Glad I saved those boards from the contractor's dumpster. I know they were air-dried for 30 years. I love recycling...

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4551/24796439348_3f5fd19798_z.jpg

cmosheh
11-26-2017, 11:31 PM
FYI - According to Mr. Vivier, the Ilur (clinker) comes in at about 245 kg -> 540 lbs. If that is true for the boomless misainier version, I suspect that the lug/sloop would be closer to 600 lbs. not to mention anchors, rode etc. Yeah, Douglas Fowler made my sails as well. He knows what he is doing and does it exceedingly well.

Cheers,
Chris

Claybaugh
11-27-2017, 12:58 PM
My CIY kit arrived a week ago and it is unpacked and in the workshop ready to start. I learned about this thread from a Wooden Boat email. This is a great record of your excellent build and it will be very helpful as I proceed with my project. I have been very impressed with the design documents and the kit contents from Clint. Another compliment to Wooden Boat for the article by Tom Pamperin in the 2017 Small Boats issue. That turned me on to this design. I know there are other new CIY kit owners and would like to hear from them as well

this will be my sixth project after two wood strip canoes, two Pygmy kayak kits and a Pram from an Iain Oughtred design. This should be an interesting winter

Bob Claybaugh
Taylors Falls MN

WI-Tom
11-27-2017, 01:01 PM
Bob,

if you need a hand with anything, give me a shout; I'm close enough to Taylors Falls that I could come by to lend a hand when you're ready to flip the boat or whatever. I do like this design a lot, so it's cool to see growing interest in it.

Tom

Chris Noto
11-28-2017, 02:14 PM
(SNIP)
The platform is positively luxurious, it's so big... or at least it seems so to me. My wife says it's not quite her kind of luxury.


I get it. My wife loves to quote some wit, lost in history, who said, "My idea of roughing it is staying in a hotel without room service."
She has slept with me in a tent exactly twice, the most recent being thirty-four years ago, and found neither of those events to her liking.
\_(ツ)_/

P.S. I love what you're doing with your CIY. It is one of the designs that I would love to build.

Larchmont Jim
11-28-2017, 08:18 PM
Chris, I have to give my wife some credit... she came with me to Small Reach Regatta this past summer, stayed in a tent with me in the campground there and was out in our dory with me every day. (We met at least one other wife there who accompanied her husband but didn't go out in the boat with him). Thankfully the weather was great, warm and sunny with light winds, which made for a very pleasant passenger experience, or else that trip might have challenged our marriage! But she's drawn the line at not inhabiting a tent that has a moving floor...

cmosheh
11-28-2017, 10:10 PM
My wife says that she wants to come with me to the next SRR. I would love that.
However, I said that first she'd have to come sail with me on Clarisa a couple of times so that she could really be sure she was up for it.
Back in the 70's and 80's we used to go on long tent-camping trips. She has not been in a tent since then.
We'll see how it goes come next sailing season...
Cheers
C.

Larchmont Jim
12-03-2017, 10:50 PM
Nice weather here in NY, so I spent more time out on the water this weekend than working on the boat. 13nm kayaking trip across Long Island Sound to Port Washington and back. Nice!

A few fineries did get some attention. I got the brass rub strip on the stem:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4519/38105376704_6616655179_z.jpg

And got the leather on the oars. Not the greatest lacing job but it's the first time I tried this. For my dory oars I had used brass tacks to attach the leather, but I think the lacing is definitely better... no holes in the wood.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4546/23956858567_2ee265c0c9_z.jpg

And with all winter to tinker on unnecessary but nice-to-have items, here is the swim ladder, in progress... I cut 5 rungs out of 1/2" galvanized steel electrical conduit from Home Depot. You want your ladder rungs to sink, and this stuff is pretty heavy. I strung line through the rungs with knots to hold everything in the right place. (The line I started with wasn't long enough, hence the two-tone line and extra knots). I am in the process of covering each rung with light line, as you can see on the top rung.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4547/27045631919_06e192c244_m.jpg (why this photo will only show in miniature, is a tech mystery to me...)

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4566/37935318115_3aafb692be_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
12-13-2017, 10:55 PM
Last weekend's project was to make a pigstick for the mainmast. In addition to looking nice, I find the pennant to be really valuable as a windicator. I made this out of a 5/8" and a 1/2" oak dowel I found at that big orange box, plus a couple of brass eye screws. Pretty simple. The halyard will tie with a clove hitch into an indent on the shaft and to an eye screw in the bottom.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4530/25175132318_64b3c3f263_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
12-13-2017, 11:00 PM
Hmm... the method I was used to using to post photos by copying a link to flickr, no longer seems to work. But whatever I did just now does seem to work...

Anyway in this photo you can see how the top section rotates freely around the lower section,

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4570/25175134868_386f9822f9_z.jpg

And a closeup of the hardware. I cut notches in the dowels for the slightly-widened eye screw to fit into and to hold the cords that attach the flag.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4526/24180669777_cf6fbe755a_z.jpg

Total cost about $9

Larchmont Jim
12-27-2017, 03:56 PM
I continue to fit out this "cruising dinghy" for eventually cruising... although not soon as it was something like 16 degrees this morning. I thought about lots of possibilities for water bottle/beer can holders but most were too ugly or too complicated. I borrowed an idea from cycling (my main pastime before I got bit by the water bug) and decided on these lightweight and fairly unobtrusive cages:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4642/24474436757_ccbeabcb8c_z.jpg

You can also see in this photo my simple lays flush/no metal handle for lifting the lazarette hatch -- a piece of webbing strap screwed to the underside of the hatch, with a notch cut into the the bulkhead so the hatch will lay flat.

I made a hiking stick/tiller extension which will allow me to steer from as far forward as the rowing thwart, and also hiked over the rail. Just an oak dowel with a knob screwed and glued on the end, and the simplest universal joint you could have to attach it to the tiller:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4636/38460973695_6c500c048a_z.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4591/39308856762_e5d2403b99_z.jpg

The line connecting the extension to the tiller ties off in a little notch I cut in the extension, with a few half hitches.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4728/25469590438_c5dc0d5f66_z.jpg

When I don't need the extension it takes about 10 seconds to remove it.

Larchmont Jim
12-27-2017, 04:08 PM
I also got the rudder uphaul and downhaul lines figured out and rigged. I cut channels in the edges of the rudder blade in the appropriate places so the lines will (hopefully) sit in the channels. The uphaul is light line attached to a hole in the aft upper corner of the blade, and the downhaul is a bungee attaches to a hole with a recess in the upper forward corner of the blade. A knot in the bungee holds it place and the knot sits inside the recess, to keep it hydrodynamically not too disruptive.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4591/27561522949_7fd1a320b8_z.jpg

Both the bungee and uphaul line are reeved through padeyes and to some little brass cleats screwed to the sides of the tiller cheeks so you can reach them both from inside the boat.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4646/24474435217_ff79082cc8_z.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4683/38630727134_bb105650e4_z.jpg

Note here that I replaced the nuts holding the tiller cheeks to the rudder with wingnuts, as I will take the rudder off the boat completely each time I stow it on my floating dock, and you can't get it off without removing the tiller from it. This photo shows a wingnut also holding the pivot pin for the blade, but I will replace that with a nylock nut since I don't intend to remove the blade from the rudder head often. (Also shows a missing bolt to hold the G10 plates to the blade; it broke and I haven't remembered to buy a new one yet.)

Larchmont Jim
12-27-2017, 07:02 PM
I was planning on getting a boat tent custom made, and I will get around to that at some point, but for starters I thought of just using an off the shelf backpacking-type tent. I found this one on the internet and its measurements and shape seemed pretty good for the application. The sleeping platform is 5' wide at the rowing thwart and about 4' at the stern sheets. Most tents I saw had the doors on the sides… no good when stepping out the side would have you swimming. This one has the entry on the end, which should allow me to get out of the tent and step into the forward part of the boat. And it cost all of $38, so cheap I thought it must be a complete piece of junk but the online reviews were actually pretty good.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4641/27563995609_d1fc00e29e_c.jpg

Well it could hardly have been more perfect if it were custom-designed for the boat… fits great. The big hoop pole just happens to fit into my oarlocks! And the smaller hoop sits on the stern sheets. For rainless nights it can serve as a bug tent just like this:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4730/38463385375_c7a417a77f_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4595/38463380525_7cfa6526c6_c.jpg

I actually pitched this much of it sitting in the boat as a test to see if it's doable, although it requires some fancy dancing on the side benches around the outside of the tent. At least it is doable in a boat that doesn't tip when you stand near the rail... If rain is expected or if it's cold I can add the rain fly. This is also doable from inside the boat but a lot trickier.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4645/38633198114_23fd3fb248_c.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4693/38633197074_d458e4cf38_c.jpg

The rain fly extends a few feet out in front of the tent, to form a vestibule, which will provide a little extra wind and rain cover for all the gear that will get tossed into the forward part of the boat.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4682/39311445212_0ffaa282ab_c.jpg

I can't wait to get out and try it on the water!

swoody126
12-27-2017, 07:39 PM
even a blind hog finds a ripe acorn every now n then ;-)

NICE!

sw

Clinton B Chase
12-27-2017, 07:53 PM
This photo shows a wingnut also holding the pivot pin for the blade, but I will replace that with a nylock nut since I don't intend to remove the blade from the rudder head often. (Also shows a missing bolt to hold the G10 plates to the blade; it broke and I haven't remembered to buy a new one yet.)

Jim I stock those bolts and nuts so let me know, I can just drop them in the mail n/c.

Larchmont Jim
01-15-2018, 07:05 PM
It was seriously cold out this weekend and while some of my kayaking buddies braved the cold to go out on MLK day, I used the excuse of working on my boat to avoid that... I love winter kayaking but like to go out when it's above freezing.

This weekend's little outfitting project was staffs to mount the nav lights on. I have two Navisafe LED nav lights, a red/green/white running lights combo and an all white masthead or stern light. While I don't think I will do much night sailing, it's good to be equipped.

Here's the stern light post, which drops through a sleeve attached to the transom and into a socket glued to the stern sheets. The Navisafe light mounts to it magnetically. I kept it relatively short so that the pole would fit into the stern tanks when not in use, and so the mizzen could clear it.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4763/25842357398_cfe8da6ef2_z.jpg

For the bow staff (for port and stbd running lights) I though it should be taller, but still want it to fit into the bow tank, so I made it two-pieces with a pivoting rig. Here it is collapsed,

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4768/27935254819_016c8e062f_z.jpg

and here extended
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4751/39714168881_5322f2371b_z.jpg

and in place in the bow...
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4767/38816237875_e394874951_z.jpg

It sits in a socket on the bow tank top and has pivoting side pieces that "grab" a small block of wood fastened on the underside of the breasthook. A bungie cord holds it all in place. The mount is quite solid; hopefully the pole (3/4" square) is stiff enough to handle some motion by the boat with the light mounted on top. The Navisafe lights weigh I would guess a half a pound.
https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4652/39004979874_9e3323d7e5_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
02-10-2018, 01:23 PM
Not much visible activity lately on this project, but I have been working on finishing details. The CIY is looking pretty good and is basically finished. When it gets warm I will put a final coat of varnish on. And then it's just getting it outdoors and rigging it.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4648/39290706045_12e64987c4_z.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4660/28408692739_f20f932e60_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
02-10-2018, 01:30 PM
For cruising, I wanted a cooler that would keep frozen food cold for 4 or 5 days. On prior cruises, even a cheapo coleman beer cooler kept frozen stuff cold for 3 days or so. Rather than getting a Yeti I made these two chillboxes out of some plywood and 1 1/2" EPS foam. With almost two inches of insulation between the ply and the foam, they should work really well -- although you don't get very much interior volume with those thick walls!

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4745/39477198944_cc948fbf5f_z.jpg


They fit snugly under the rowing thwart where they don't add any clutter...

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4706/39290705635_3a0e01114b_z.jpg

and are practically invisible from the cockpit:


https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4676/26316018418_94cfc5d640_z.jpg

Larchmont Jim
03-21-2018, 08:44 PM
Does anyone have a good canvasmaker they would recommend? I need to get a cover made for my Calendar Islands Yawl. It will live outside year 'round and sit on a floating dock all summer, so a good cover made of sunbrella or some such fabric is critical.

Over a month with no work done on the boat... competing time demands. One of the last tasks before final painting was installing sockets for battens/bows that will hold an arch in the cover. I made some little sockets that I glued in just under the inwale, for the battens to slot into:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/804/39138414850_97a4d7f187_z.jpg

The battens will hold an arch in the cover:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/817/26075485597_55c5a0ac59_z.jpg

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/797/40948024781_886a5118da_z.jpg

Unfortunately I made these sockets out of philippine mahogany, to match the inwales, and it has a propensity to split. Two of them already broke from being levered by the battens. That occurred while I was fitting the over-long battens in place. Now that I have the battens cut to the right length, they don't put much stress on the sockets, but I guess I will make two replacement sockets out of true mahogany which should be stronger...

minuteman
03-22-2018, 11:18 AM
Neat idea. If you plan to sleep on board you might be able to use them as tent supports, too.

essaunders
03-30-2018, 10:41 AM
It's going to be sunny this Saturday. Are you going pull the new boat out of the garage for a proper photo session? (and rigging and varnish, I suppose....)

Clinton B Chase
03-31-2018, 08:28 AM
So folks know, Jim has offered (or I asked, forget which) to show his CIY at the WoodenBoat Show in Mystic in late June. So it will be there with the rig up and looking good, on land in my booth at the north end of Tent A next to the IBIM lawn area.

RonP
03-31-2018, 09:16 AM
That is cool the way that epoxy doesn't stick to the tube, your boat is beautiful.
Finally onto planking... cutting laps, cutting gains, and epoxying everything together. Cutting the laps is complicated by the flimsiness of 6mm plywood planks. You really have to use two hands with a block plane, one to hold the plane and the other to hold the back of the plane -- actually to squeeze the plane and the plank together-- as you move the plane along. Forget about using a #4 plane for this job. But okoume is soft so it's easy to plane, and the plys make it easy to calibrate the evenness of the bevel.

The Stanley #78 rabbet plane makes easy work of the gains for the bow.

I'm using a clamping batten and drywall screws into backing blocks to clamp the laps for gluing. The first one I did with a 1/2" thick spruce batten and the forward end came out with low spots between the molds and a less-than fair curve. For the second one, I used a 5/8" thick oak batten on the forward half of the boat... that did the trick and pulled the planks into a nice fair curve. The after end is less troubling for the planks and I only have one thicker batten so I still used the spruce batten on that. Here's the work in progress:

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2945/33474057010_1c9c78aa62_c.jpg

You learn as you go. My first plank gluing job was a real mess of epoxy everywhere and sagging fillets. On the second one I used this gizmo that I found at the local hardware/chandlery store. What a great time-saver and quality improver over a big syringe or a pastry bag. You just fill it with your epoxy putty/goop and use it with a construction glue gun. When you're done, there's no real cleanup... just let whatever small amount of epoxy is still in the end and in the nozzle harden, and the next day push it out the back with a rod. You can see the clump of hardened epoxy that came out of this one. Now it's ready to use again. Almost as good as sliced bread!

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2893/33072518693_87bc962237_c.jpg

Larchmont Jim
04-01-2018, 08:18 AM
It was indeed sunny and beautiful yesterday... so I pulled an old boat (kayak) out of the boathouse and went for a 10-mile spin on Long Island Sound. I have two Pygmies, both great boats. I used my Murrelet yesterday.

Then I got back to work on the CIY. On Friday I removed thwarts, cleats, oarlocks etc. to get ready for final paint & varnish. Then spent hours with a broom and a shopvac trying to remove dust from every nook and cranny in my crowded 1-car garage boat shop. What a mess! In some places there must have been 1/8" of wood dust. Yesterday I got the final coat of paint on the inside of the hull. Today I'll put one more coat of red on the sheer strake; it got a few dings in it in the course of fitting out the boat. Then wait for some more good weather to get the final coat of varnish on.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/901/40445466924_ee1196f503_c.jpg
Pygmy Boats Murrelet (foreground) and Arctic Tern 14 (background)

BrianMCarney
04-02-2018, 09:34 AM
Gorgeous Jim. Today of course it's snowing again...

Larchmont Jim
04-02-2018, 07:50 PM
Hi Brian, how are you doing? Yes indeed within the space of 48 hours we went from sunbathing in a drysuit to snow dumping from the sky...

I invite you to come sailing with me on the CIY’s maiden voyage which should be in early May. You are my only co-builder other than my son. Are you still in Pelham? I’ll be having a coming-out party for the boat in a few weeks (i.e. the boat needs to come out of the garage and get put on the trailer, and I need a few hands to help carry it!).

BrianMCarney
04-03-2018, 10:45 AM
Jim,
I'm living in New Paltz now, which isn't _too_ far up river. And still have family members in Westchester so I'm down frequently. I'd love to come down for the launch and maiden voyage, so please keep me posted on your progress!

Larchmont Jim
05-06-2018, 10:29 PM
Getting close to launch date... This weekend I got the sails rigged.

Leg'o'mutton mizzen -- (I used my dory as a mast-holder, but no, that's not the boat it goes with)
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/864/41937202521_3bd4907b42_m.jpg

And the enormous balanced lug main. I am pretty amazed by the size of this rig for a 16-foot boat. I think I am going to be reefing frequently. But it should be good for my end of Long Island Sound, which is notorious for very little wind in the summer. I figured out a reefing setup that seems to work well, although I won't really know until I get it out on the water.

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/977/41037665155_6b22ea38dd_z.jpg

Clinton B Chase
05-08-2018, 07:33 AM
Jim, Looks really good...nice reef points! Sail looks good with crease along foot and the head.

On my GIS, I have jiffy reefing but I don't love it because it adds lines and hardware where I don't want more mess along the boom.

I tell you, reefing is still a work in progress for me but my latest, simple set up is:
-a good 3/16" low stretch line for the tack that can be untied and retied into the first reef grommet.
-a reef point hangs from first reef grommet and is used to loop under boom
-the outhaul is retied to the new clew and a loop of line hanging from grommet passes under boom
-tie reef points to bunch up sail, or I usually do a quick daisy chain around the bunched up foot
-ready to go, -this set up requires very little extra line and no additional hardware

Larchmont Jim
05-31-2018, 07:51 AM
Launch day is this Saturday! Finally... 18 months in the making. I actually had the boat basically complete after about 12 months, but had another winter to work on final details. I even ran out of details.

I got the leather sewn onto the boom and the yard where they connect with the mast. I cut it a little too small for the boom, hence the gap:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1739/28600772948_e09a08114d_c.jpg

And the piece of leather I bought (from Duckworks BBS - which has several different leather kits) for the yard was also too small. The spiral lacing pattern wasn't to be creative, it was how I was able to close the gap. The sewing job is, not surprisingly, better on the yard which I did second than on the boom which I did first:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/882/28600772508_fe212d6705_c.jpg

And the last detail, fixed to the aft tanks bulkhead, since Clint will be using my boat as a display model at the Wooden Boat Show in Mystic CT in late June:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1729/40664507650_40caa6a7b9_c.jpg

Falcon1
05-31-2018, 01:05 PM
I look forward to seeing her at the show! Have a great day Saturday!

Mike

Clinton B Chase
06-04-2018, 12:11 PM
Congrats on Jim's launch!

Larchmont Jim
06-04-2018, 06:46 PM
Wahoo! I got the boat out of the garage, on the trailer and into the water for the first time on Saturday. Finally a photo of the whole boat, masts and all:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1732/42570011491_b3802d8d1d_c.jpg

The launch day was hot and humid, with almost no wind when I finally got on the water at around 5pm. For a really big dinghy, it rows pretty nicely but it is a bit of work. But with any wind at all I would choose to sail. With all 121 sq ft of sail hoisted, even in whispers of wind the boat would move. I got out about a mile when the not surprising threat of thunderstorms started looking real. Seeing a big ugly rainstorm coming my way I quickly hove to (which is easy - just sheet in the mizzen and let go the mainsheet) and reefed down to the smallest of my 3 reef points. Then high-tailed it back to port. With max reef and maybe 15 knots of wind my gps showed 5.5-6.0 knots on a reach. Then the wind lightened and the storm went elsewhere, and I shook out two reefs and continued home. My reefing rig with stainless steel reef hooks at tack and clew worked really well, is very easy and quick to manage.

My short first voyage wasn't enough for me to have a really good view of how the boat sails. I'll report more after a couple more outings!

Sorry, no photos of the boat on the water -- I was sailing singlehanded and had no hands for a camera.

essaunders
06-05-2018, 09:54 AM
congratulations on the launch. thanks for sharing!

AJZimm
06-05-2018, 07:22 PM
Congrats on the launch! You went out, the water stayed on the right side of the hull, you rowed, you sailed, you avoided death by squall - sounds like a pretty successful first outing!

Looking forward to hearing more.

Larchmont Jim
06-18-2018, 10:57 PM
At last a photo of the CIY on the water!

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/891/28018184687_8274e1b5b1_b.jpg

cmosheh
06-19-2018, 08:41 AM
Congratulations!!!
What an awesome build with so many extra goodies!
No doubt this boat will keep you safe and serve you well!
Cheers!
Chris

Larchmont Jim
06-24-2018, 10:08 PM
I lent my CIY to Clint Chase so he could use it as a display model at the WoodenBoat Show in Mystic, CT this weekend. Here it is on display. The tent was tall enough that the mast fit, although he could only put the sail up with 3 reefs in it:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1798/41182536280_680f32ba63_c.jpg



https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1788/41182536380_413b124b0e_z.jpg

And I was quite pleased to come home with this:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1773/42274536234_a5985614c9_z.jpg

Yep, Best In Show in the Owner Built - Sail category!!! It was Clint's idea to enter it into the Concours d'Elegance contest. I didn't think my work was worthy, and there were many, many gorgeous boats there. But I'll keep the mug!

cmosheh
06-25-2018, 06:38 AM
WOW! Congratulations on the win!

StevenBauer
06-25-2018, 06:45 AM
A well deserved win! Fantastic job, Jim, and it was nice meeting you yesterday.

Claybaugh
07-14-2018, 01:36 PM
Today we glued up the mainmast. Special thanks to Brian Carney, who made himself known to me via this forum and who lives just 5 miles from me, for graciously offering to help me with what is definitively a 2-man task. Brian has a Goat Island Skiff that he built so this task was a repeat for him.

Since the staves were reasonably well milled, everything went together smoothly. Here are the plugs in each end of the mast. We also put a solid core in the mast where it will encounter the mast partner, complete with wedges cut out of it to give it a crown shape similar to Brian's post above and to match Clint's drawing. The plug in the masthead will be cut flush:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/632/32758118500_4dc637c323_c.jpg

Whereas the plug at the butt of the mast will be rounded and will become the mortise that sticks into the mast step:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/656/33013621381_5158dfc27c_c.jpg
Jim great boat and congratulations on your award at the Wooden Boat show. I am in process of dry fitting the main mast on my CIY. I would like some pointers on gluing up the mast. Which epoxy did you use, how did you apply it and do the assembly. Thanks
Bob

Larchmont Jim
07-15-2018, 10:44 AM
Jim great boat and congratulations on your award at the Wooden Boat show. I am in process of dry fitting the main mast on my CIY. I would like some pointers on gluing up the mast. Which epoxy did you use, how did you apply it and do the assembly. Thanks
Bob

Bob,


You can see in the photo the cradle I set up for the gluing, to keep the mast straight. I cut 6 or 7 cradles, carefully matching the diameters of the mast at each station, and lined them up on the building frame with a string line to ensure they were straight and all centered on the same line (side to side is easy but you have to get the heights right as well.)

I used general purpose epoxy (I built this whole boat with Raka, but I've used System Three and MAS on other boats and they are all equally good). I mixed painted the V's./birdsmouths first with unthickened epoxy, then put on a mixture of epoxy with colloidal silica and wood flour thickened to about mayonnaise consistency. I basically mixed the silica and wood flour so as to try to match the color of the spruce.

It's definitely easier to have two people to do the gluing. One to mix the epoxy while the other is applying it. You will need several batches as there is a LOT of surface area to glue. And those staves are long and floppy once they have glue on them, so takes two people to handle them.

I used a hose clamp about every foot to clamp the staves in place for the glue to set. Use the cordless drill/driver on a very low torque setting to tighten them up. Don't worry about crushing the edges of the wood, as that will get planed off in the rounding anyway. It is a good idea to spray a light coating of oil on the clamps before you use them, so the epoxy won't get too stuck onto them.

Clinton B Chase
08-16-2018, 10:30 PM
I certainly hope you do make it to the next SRR with your beautiful CIY. Meanwhile, let's not worry about the GIS! That skiff should easily sail away from most of the heavier boats simply because it'll be on a plane quickly and leave heavier boats in the rear view mirror (as it were). With that narrow hull and hard chine it should be able to run circles around most of the typical SRR boats. If I had a GIS it would be equipped with high-end hiking straps. :) and some form of padding on the gunwale :) :) This might sound strange but the GIS somehow strikes me like a lower-budget Thistle for small boat builders... obviously totally different other than it'll sail away from most anyone else other than perhaps a Flying Dutchman (not even talking about skiffs with gennakers)

The CIY does not strike me as a boat intended for planing (Clint might want to chime in here). So, being lighter, the CIY might have an advantage of us Ilurs. Of course it carries less canvas so that's an obvious factor. Ilurs and CIY's might surf given perfect conditions but (John: correct me if you know otherwise) planing is not an intended part of Ilur package.

Looking forward to see your finished boat! Happy Thanksgiving!
Chris

Chris never did reply...
I think the CIY will plane sooner than an ILUR, but neither are meant for all out speed. That said, the aft sections on the CIY are pretty flat, so I think in the right hands it will scoot. The CIY is lighter so I can imagine that it will outrun an ILUR, but in choppy water it would lose to an ILUR. Again, as more of them get on the water, we will see!

Larchmont Jim
08-27-2018, 11:08 PM
Maybe this should go in the Designs & Plans section, but for anyone who followed the build progress of the Calendar Islands Yawl, here's a report on the actual design and sailing performance, based on about 9 or 10 outings in the boat.

Firstof all, I love the boat! Of course I am biased, after a year and a halfbuilding it. Nobody’s baby is ever ugly. But it sails great, has abig open cockpit that is really comfortable (an advantage of the daggerboard vsa centerboard version) and is super easy to rig and to sail. I have hadfour people out in it for a sail and there is ample room.

Itis definitely about the biggest boat I can use in the manner I do, which is tolaunch it from and haul it up onto a floating dock as its home when not in use. I can rig it, launch it, and retrieve it at the floating docksingle-handedly. There is no way I could do that with an Ilur or anArctic Tern, other designs that I considered before deciding on the CIY. But it has the passenger- carrying and camp-aboard room equal to eitherof those.

Awooden roller mounted at the edge of the dock makes this possible:
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/363/32870590265_80bc2f4b4e_z.jpg



Thenarrow flat bottom panel and lack of a keel means that the boat sits flat oralmost on the dock or on a beach, and rolls well on the roller.

Asto speed, due to the summer weather in Eastern Long Island Sound, I.e mostlylittle or no wind, I haven’t really tested the CIY in a strong blow. Butin 15 knots of wind and flat water that we experienced on one short sail, idealconditions, the GPS showed 5.0 knots average on a reach, and peaked out reading6.5 in some gusts. There was no surfing going on there and certainly noplaning, but the boat moved well.

Toget the boat to plane, you would need more power than I have so far beenwilling to apply in my mostly single-handed sailing. I am pretty athleticbut I only weigh 150 pounds. With two sailors sitting on the rail andwith legs hooked under a hiking strap, racing dinghy-style, you could probablyget it to plane for short periods.

Ihave hiking strap attachment points mounted on the centerline to the frame on which the rowingthwart sits and to the stern bulkhead (forward end of lazarette and sterntanks), but haven’t had the occasion to rig and use it yet. I also have atiller extension, which would be necessary.

Inlight winds the boat moves amazingly well. The 122 sq ft rig is almostoversized for a 250-pound (my guess) boat with a 13.5 ft waterline. Which means I have been able to make 2.5-3 knots boat speed in maybe 5-6 knots ofwind.

Ihave learned that this big rig you have to reef early. I havehad to re-learn when I typically think about reefing to account for the bigrig. If it looks like more than ten knots and I am sailing solo, onereef is called for and makes handling easier.

Ihad Douglas Fowler put three sets of reef points in my mainsail, at about 30-inch vertical spacing. Withthe third reef set (at which point you would also furl the mizzen) the sailarea is reduced by more than half.

Windwardperformance is pretty good with the lug main being very high-aspect. Still, I have found that you can’t strap the mainsail in too tight —nowhere near centerline — or it chokes off the speed. So you end uppointing maybe 50 degrees off the wind to maintain good speed. The mizzendoesn’t do a lot going to windward, as it is small and you need to make sure itis almost luffing just a bit or else you will carry too much weather helm. But off the wind the mizzen is helps balance and adds power, and dead downwind you canwing-and-wing.

Insteady light air I have been able to clear the mainsheet and tie off the tillerwith a bungee arrangement and the boat will sail itself, leaving me hands freeto take photos or drink a beer. Sweet!

Theother thing I love about the mizzen is the ability to luff head-to-wind that it provides. It’s huge for a single-handed sailor. Justsheet in the mizzen, let go the mainsheet and the tiller, and the boat lieshead to wind. To avoid putting stress on the rudder, I usually tie thetiller centerline with the bungee if I’m going to spend any time hove-to.

Also,just the windage on sails and hull will cause the boat to make pretty goodsternway. To minimize that I bought a fishing drogue /sea anchor which Ijust leave rigged up in the bow. It takes 10 seconds to toss itoverboard, and the boat just stops. 23 bucks from Bass Pro Shops, a storeI never thought I would ever buy anything from.

Yesterday I was out with my son and nephew in 12-14 knots with gusts to 18, and the typical lumpy waves kicked up by too many powerboats zooming around Long Island Sound. The boat is pretty dry but the guy sitting forwardmost will get wet going to windward. Off wind, completely dry. We put in one reef and still had a lot of sail to handle, and ~375 pounds of human ballast was still on the rail going to windward. It was a hoot! Averaged maybe 4 knots upwind, and 5-5.5 on the reach home.

The other great thing about the boat is the looks. The semi-traditional rig is beautiful and everywhere I go with the boat I get compliments. Clint really nailed the lines to look great and also perform well. I love this boat!

Here are a couple of photos of the boat sailing and the boat doubling as a swim platform, showing the ability to have a party of 4 (I took the one picture from the water swimming) in comfort:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1863/44267573482_2ffc8fd299_z.jpg

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1898/43409555945_fd0ef58015_c.jpg

BrianMCarney
08-28-2018, 07:58 AM
Looks and sounds great Jim. I hope I can get down there for a sail one of these days—maybe next summer!

Larchmont Jim
10-27-2018, 07:10 PM
Hi folks. This has nothing to do with building, since I finished my build of the Calendar Islands Yawl in time for the summer sailing season. But since the season has now ended for me, I started writing about my experiences using the boat. For those who care, it's on my blog at GreyFoxboat.wordpress.com

I guess blogs are normally contemporaneous, but I was sailing over the summer not writing, so I'm now playing catch-up. It's lso a little light on photos and maybe heavy on prose, but I was sailing not photographing much either. Next year, who knows, maybe GoPro footage and virtual reality...

I had a ton of fun and only a few misadventures with the boat so far, and while I didn't manage to go cruising in it, which is what I built it for, I shook it and me down to where I am quite confident in the boat and what I can do in it next summer. I think Clint has come up with a great design with the Calendar Islands Yawl.

WI-Tom
10-27-2018, 07:25 PM
It's great to see another CIY out there. I had the chance to sail the very first one in Duluth a few years back, and was impressed. I think I'd like the daggerboard version even better, as the CB does limit interior room a bit. Certainly a beautiful design.

In the same length range as Ross Lillistone's Phoenix III or John Welsford's Walkabout, but a much higher volume (and noticeably higher freeboard than the Phoenix III in particular)--with all the advantages and trade-offs the extra volume brings with it. More biased toward sailing than rowing but still rows adequately enough to get the job done.

In short, a great cruising boat that doesn't need an engine.

Edit to add: I have a hard time believing there are only two of these boats built so far--it really is a great design. I hope that having your boat at Mystic show gets it lots of attention. Congrats on the award, by the way.

Tom

essaunders
10-29-2018, 01:22 PM
Jim
Nice blog. thanks for taking the time to write it and share it.

Any updates on foot braces for rowing? Or is that a project for this winter?

Erik

Larchmont Jim
10-29-2018, 07:22 PM
I made a moveable footbrace that was held in place by webbing straps, so I could stuff it away under the thwart when not using it. It was a big improvement over nothing, but in use I figured out some flaws in the design. I'm currently making an improved version and will post some photos once it's finished.

I must say though, that the CIY has so much sail area that I ended up not rowing much at all this summer. If there's even a breath of wind, it's easier to sail than row. I find myself sailing the CIY in conditions that would have caused me to get out the oars and row if I were in my Northeaster Dory.
The only significant distance I rowed this summer was one 2.5 mile transit, before I even had the temporary footbrace, and I managed to average over 3 knots.

Larchmont Jim
11-24-2018, 09:18 AM
Here are a couple of photos of the footbrace for rowing. Two webbing straps hold it in place fore-and-aft when in use. Hopefully it won't move around too much sideways.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4842/45115878845_313294a12f_c.jpg


https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4911/45115878865_f88650715a_c.jpg

Considering it's about 20 degrees out here in NY, I won't get a chance to test it for a while though!

In terms of other tweaks/modifications or repairs to do over the winter, there aren't many. The boat survived one sailing season pretty well without too many dings in the paint or varnish. I may make a boom crutch to hold the boom in place for a boom tent.

Larchmont Jim
11-24-2018, 09:30 AM
Hmm... not sure how the upside down photos got there.

Also, now that sailing season is over I have been able to post a few new entries in my blog about actually using this boat, at www.greyfoxboat.blog

swoody126
11-24-2018, 09:36 AM
stealing your strap pad idea for my AF-3

GREAT organizational feature!

AND SIMPLE

it's folks like you who post pics that make inovation easier for folks like me ;-)

MANY THANKS

sw

Clinton B Chase
03-08-2019, 06:32 AM
That footrest will work well.

The simplest form of this that I am instructing is a nice 8-sided bar made of Pine that is as wide as you like. It is made of two halves, the center of each receiving a dado. The middle is thus hollow and you can run a line back from midship frame, through the bar, back to midship frame. Make it off with a an adjustable hitch not and you have a foot stretcher that can stow out of the way easily. Your heels can rest on it, or under tension the bar will roll into the arch of your foot. I would have the bar be at least, 1-5/8" up to 2" 8-sided. The facets allow the bar to rest on the floor.