PDA

View Full Version : Yacht tender - good to row, good to tow, good to sail. quick to build



dylan winter
12-10-2016, 12:46 PM
Chaps,

I have a 26 foot twin keel snot box - and this past year I have been towing my simulated snot clinker dinghy.

I am never going back to a flubber.

It is nine foot four long and four feet wide.

She tows like dream - never ships water

here she is being towed in boisterous conditions

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Z7gQValP7w

she rows a treat and I sail her without a centre plate using a steering oar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXnDwyS974A


http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/KeepTurningLeft-Scotland-.Still005.jpg

http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/KeepTurningLeft-Scotland-.Still010.jpg


my chippy friend has a 26 foot yacht and likes my tender, he has a shed full of tools and I thought the two of us could build two dinghies pretty quickly

the idea is to do it quick and cheap using stitch and glue and polyester because it is easier to work in a cold shed.- it goes off quickly and you can splodge on more mat and gunge if a joint looks a bit iffy.

but we could tolerate quite a few panels as he has a good band saw.

these boats will get towed and dragged across beaches so we willl be painting them all over

I aim to use exterior grade ply for the panels and pine for the othere bits of the boat

these materials have done well on the duck punt - they are cheap

fenders will be used for bouyancy as with the snot boat

the aim is to build two boats as quickly as possible

any suggestions chaps



D

DeniseO30
12-10-2016, 01:57 PM
Take the lines from the glass dink. Epoxy works cold just takes longer

dylan winter
12-10-2016, 02:47 PM
nope

DGentry
12-10-2016, 03:50 PM
Quick and cheap to build, sails great, rows great (for an 8' boat), 55lbs/25kg. Not stitch and glue, though . . . .
http://gentrycustomboats.com/PRP.html
http://gentrycustomboats.com/pics/PRPSailing3.JPG
Otherwise I suspect Bolger's Rubens Nymph, Joel White's Nutshell, Michalak's Vole, to name just a few, would work for you.

phiil
12-10-2016, 03:54 PM
I have a 26 foot cabin cruiser and my tender needs are similar. I am leaning toward our host's plans for the Nutshell pram, or the similar one from Oughtred, Acorn, I think. CLC also has one, the eastport pram, which can also be had as a kit or plans. I am interested to hear what others have decided on.

dylan winter
12-10-2016, 04:47 PM
Quick and cheap to build, sails great, rows great (for an 8' boat), 55lbs/25kg. Not stitch and glue, though . . . .
http://gentrycustomboats.com/PRP.html
http://gentrycustomboats.com/pics/PRPSailing3.JPG
Otherwise I suspect Bolger's Rubens Nymph, Joel White's Nutshell, Michalak's Vole, to name just a few, would work for you.

this is the sort of thing

I want it a bit bigger

I want a proper stem

no centre plate - no rudder

it needs a pretty good forefoot and a bit of a skeg

I reckon I want four chines

D

Peerie Maa
12-10-2016, 05:00 PM
Give up on the proper stem, a Norwegian long nose pram will be better and a lot easier to build.
Something along these lines.
http://simonwattsfurniture.com/uploads/3/4/6/0/34607963/2726655_orig.png

dylan winter
12-10-2016, 05:10 PM
Give up on the proper stem, a Norwegian long nose pram will be better and a lot easier to build.
Something along these lines.
http://simonwattsfurniture.com/uploads/3/4/6/0/34607963/2726655_orig.png



I like the look of the stem parting the waves - and I spend a lot of time looking at the tnder so I have to like the look of it

D

Peerie Maa
12-10-2016, 05:13 PM
I like the look of the stem parting the waves - and I spend a lot of time looking at the tnder so I have to like the look of it

D

You spend all your time staring at the tenders stem rather than where you are going?

rbgarr
12-10-2016, 05:26 PM
How about these two, one with a stem the other a pram, each with an elongated, deeper plank-on-edge keel for sailing? Use an oar through a sculling notch for steering. You could also finish out the interior more simply than the plans show.

http://store.gartsideboats.com/collections/dinghies-and-daysailers/products/11-ft-plywood-yacht-tender-design-120 (http://www.dhylanboats.com/wordpress/wp-content/images/plans/oonagh_study_plans.pdf)

http://www.dhylanboats.com/wordpress/wp-content/images/plans/oonagh_study_plans.pdf

Peerie Maa
12-10-2016, 05:30 PM
I like the look of the stem parting the waves - and I spend a lot of time looking at the tnder so I have to like the look of it

D

Start cutting up cereal boxes. First into scale 8x4s, then to come up with plank shapes. Either that or get a copy of Freeship (https://freeship-plus.en.softonic.com/) and play with that.

Zuri
12-10-2016, 05:54 PM
Hey Dylan,

How about a Shellback?

It's got a proper stem. 3 strakes plus a bottom panel. Goes together pretty quick. I started mine 5 weeks ago.

https://c5.staticflickr.com/6/5596/31413106932_a8164a9623_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/PRSogW)

[IMG]https://c5.staticflickr.com/1/705/31413105692_ecd026dfdb_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/PRSnUy)


Joel White design for a combination of rowing, towing and sailing.

You could stick it on top of your Golf too.

Travis.

dylan winter
12-10-2016, 06:12 PM
You spend all your time staring at the tenders stem rather than where you are going?

nope - but I do see it quite a bit

dylan winter
12-10-2016, 06:14 PM
Hey Dylan,

How about a Shellback?

It's got a proper stem. 3 strakes plus a bottom panel. Goes together pretty quick. I started mine 5 weeks ago.

https://c5.staticflickr.com/6/5596/31413106932_a8164a9623_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/PRSogW)

[IMG]https://c5.staticflickr.com/1/705/31413105692_ecd026dfdb_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/PRSnUy)


Joel White design for a combination of rowing, towing and sailing.

You could stick it on top of your Golf too.

Travis.

this is the closest yet

one thing I like about the sweet pea is that the forefoot and stem mean that I can do without the centre plate

dylan winter
12-10-2016, 06:17 PM
How about these two, one with a stem the other a pram, each with an elongated, deeper plank-on-edge keel for sailing? Use an oar through a sculling notch for steering. You could also finish out the interior more simply than the plans show.

(http://www.dhylanboats.com/wordpress/wp-content/images/plans/oonagh_study_plans.pdf)http://store.gartsideboats.com/collections/dinghies-and-daysailers/products/11-ft-plywood-yacht-tender-design-120

http://www.dhylanboats.com/wordpress/wp-content/images/plans/oonagh_study_plans.pdf

these are in the right direction

getting rid of the rudder and centre plate keeps things light

Zuri
12-10-2016, 06:31 PM
Since you are building it - how about just making the forefoot, keel/skeg member deeper and eliminate the daggerboard trunk? You could always add that later. You could make the keel quite deep and add or subtract from it later too.

Steer it with a single paddle with the skulling notch on the back.

Or just add a couple thole pin locations along the rail and steer it like your duck punt.

Seems like that would fit your style.

I bet if you don't use any fiberglass, eliminate the trunk, you could probably get it down under 100 lbs.

Travis.

Al G
12-10-2016, 06:44 PM
http://snowpetrelsailing.blogspot.com.au/2015/01/a-dinghy-to-row-galifreya.html?m=1
Hi Dylan, check out the above link if you are still looking. Not sure if Ben would sell plans or not but maybe worth a look. Cheers, mate. Thanks for all the entertainment on KTL.

Al G
12-10-2016, 06:49 PM
Regarding above post, perhaps not a super easy build but if you're making two at once it wouldn't be so bad...

StevenBauer
12-10-2016, 07:08 PM
Isn't the Shellback a little big at 12'? I'd recomend the larger version of the Nutshell Pram. Joel White's meant for plywood version of a classic Herreshoff Pram. At 9'6" it's just the right size for a tender. I've enjoyed many hours on the water with this view following me:


http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/2009%20cruise/IMG_3450.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/bauerdad/media/2009%20cruise/IMG_3450.jpg.html)


Who says it's too cold to swim in Maine?
http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/2009%20cruise/IMG_3441.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/bauerdad/media/2009%20cruise/IMG_3441.jpg.html)

dylan winter
12-10-2016, 07:20 PM
Isn't the Shellback a little big at 12'? I'd recomend the larger version of the Nutshell Pram. Joel White's meant for plywood version of a classic Herreshoff Pram. At 9'6" it's just the right size for a tender. I've enjoyed many hours on the water with this view following me:


http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/2009%20cruise/IMG_3450.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/bauerdad/media/2009%20cruise/IMG_3450.jpg.html)


Who says it's too cold to swim in Maine?
http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/2009%20cruise/IMG_3441.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/bauerdad/media/2009%20cruise/IMG_3441.jpg.html)



I confess that looks pretty nice

but I do like a proper bow

Zuri
12-10-2016, 07:31 PM
Shellback is 11'-3". It's pretty much the larger nutshell with a pointy end.

Travis.

Jamesh
12-10-2016, 08:34 PM
The Lawson tender by Gardiner?
Sweet lines.
I'm his book with another whose name eludes me.
Cheers James

wizbang 13
12-10-2016, 08:54 PM
I gotta make a towing dingy next year. That boat noisy Steven? I cannot tolerate a noisy dink.
bruce

StevenBauer
12-11-2016, 12:28 AM
I don't think it's noisy, Bruce. But our HumbleBee might be a little quieter.


http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/Talismans%202010%20cruise%20with%20Acacia/Aug2010SailingVacation009.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/bauerdad/media/Talismans%202010%20cruise%20with%20Acacia/Aug2010SailingVacation009.jpg.html)



http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/Talismans%202010%20cruise%20with%20Acacia/100_0069.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/bauerdad/media/Talismans%202010%20cruise%20with%20Acacia/100_0069.jpg.html)



http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/Talismans%202010%20cruise%20with%20Acacia/100_0049.jpg (http://s146.photobucket.com/user/bauerdad/media/Talismans%202010%20cruise%20with%20Acacia/100_0049.jpg.html)

dylan winter
12-11-2016, 02:19 AM
I gotta make a towing dingy next year. That boat noisy Steven? I cannot tolerate a noisy dink.
bruce

longer line is good

I tow mine on a painter that is 1.5 times the length of the mother ship

http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/davids-snap.jpg

dylan winter
12-11-2016, 03:52 AM
Zuri,

just saw your build thread

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?215019-Shellback-for-Zuri

You are doing a lovely job

now if I did a less lovely job - stitch and glue on that hull with maybe just two temporary frames and a transom

one seat at the back, one rowing thwart across the middle - add some wear strips on the outside to allow me to drag this dinghy across a pebbly beach

maybe a sinple mast step for the optimist rig

could two of us build two in a week?

D

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-11-2016, 05:38 AM
http://www.selway-fisher.com/Cobles.htm
[http://www.selway-fisher.com/NCoble9p2.jpg

9'4" leave off the ruder and daggerboard if you want

dylan winter
12-11-2016, 07:47 AM
http://www.selway-fisher.com/Cobles.htm
[http://www.selway-fisher.com/NCoble9p2.jpg

9'4" leave off the ruder and daggerboard if you want

excellent suggestion

this might be the one

D

Tom3
12-11-2016, 10:46 AM
It's hard to beat a pram for a tender. In fact, the Nutshell at 9'6" would require around 11' LOA to equal the displacement.

The Nutshell has a V shape in the garboard planks so it behaves like a sharp stem under tow,....

https://c7.staticflickr.com/9/8028/29494315942_4cc95ccbe3_h.jpg
...oar...

https://c8.staticflickr.com/9/8006/29523364991_597cb59c96_b.jpg

....or sail.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/1/577/23579210681_68453e3813_h.jpg

The Nutshell is our second pram in over 30 years of coastal sailing. We've towed prams to the Bahamas and back - twice. The first pram was an 8'er. It served us but was small for two. The Nutshell - which I built over 20 years ago out of Fir plywood(marine grade) - is a real boat in comparison to the 8', not just a tender.

Building two would save labor re-using the form. The build would be a piece of cake for you. Ours lives outside year round and is adorned with house paint.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1490/24109952265_be79b4d848_h.jpg

My wife and I are tremendous fans of your work, Dylan(we've sent some taps). We can hardly wait for your adventure to continue. Tom Young, Rockport Maine.

dylan winter
12-11-2016, 11:14 AM
thanks for the nice words...... and the tap

I have to say towing the tender is no stress at all - mine just sheds the water. I think we have all got so used to towing flubbers that we think that towing a dinghy is a pain.

I like to see her gamely surfing behind us and she has been through some really horrible conditions.

I have been thinking that a small bunged hole in the transome might be a good idea so that if she did take on some water then she could just surf it out.

I also love having the tender to sail. At the end of the day Jill has had enough sailing and wants to sit in the cockpit drinking tea and reading an improving book - I am still keen to get out to explore the nooks and crannies.

Dp you have any bouyancy in the dinghy.

I think house paint is a good idea - set out to paint it and you can make the woodwork a bit sloppy.

I am taken with the little fisher - I like the bow and the deep forefoot. As she is a coble shape I could put a couple of skegs on the stern to help her to track.

The aim is to make the two dinghies in a week.

gilberj
12-11-2016, 11:36 AM
There are quite a few good dinghy's. John Welsford's Sherpa or the smaller Tender Behind. LFH. Prams, Nutshell as mentioned. I'd something a little longer, 8' minimum, better 10' even 12'. The longer boat should tow with about the same drag as a short boat, and carry a load better and more safely.

Tom3
12-11-2016, 11:37 AM
I have to say towing the tender is no stress at all - mine just sheds the water. I think we have all got so used to towing flubbers that we think that towing a dinghy is a pain.

I like to see her gamely surfing behind us and she has been through some really horrible conditions.

I have been thinking that a small bunged hole in the transome might be a good idea so that if she did take on some water then she could just surf it out.

I also love having the tender to sail. At the end of the day Jill has had enough sailing and wants to sit in the cockpit drinking tea and reading an improving book - I am still keen to get out to explore the nooks and crannies.

Dp you have any bouyancy in the dinghy.

I think house paint is a good idea - set out to paint it and you can make the woodwork a bit sloppy.

I am taken with the little fisher - I like the bow and the deep forefoot. As she is a coble shape I could put a couple of skegs on the stern to help her to track.

The aim is to make the two dinghies in a week.

No bouyancy outside of pfds lashed inside (we alway's have at least two). In thousands of miles and up to 40 knots and following seas, we've never had a problem that was difficult or unsafe to handle. When she starts surfing into our stern we add a dockline to the tow line. I have towed warps from the Nutshell stern in surfing conditions. The trick of the pram is that it doesn't get squirrelly and maintains direction better than some V bows. Here in Nantucket Sound in 25 knots. Easy for a well designed pram.

https://c5.staticflickr.com/1/591/31538763556_e4ee6e44b3_h.jpg


But if it is a sharp stem you like, you'll stay with it. And 2 Nutshells (or Shellback) in a week, that won't happen! Better a straight stitch and glue and maybe some Meth for you guys. :)

My daughter again sailing the Nutsell. I have old photos of her at 3-4 years old, kneeling on the inverted Nutshell, driving screws. She just turned 26.

https://c3.staticflickr.com/9/8673/16728632906_0e77f1def6_b.jpg

dylan winter
12-11-2016, 01:36 PM
my plan is to build two of these

http://www.selway-fisher.com/Cobles.htm

stitch and glue

I will use as many pre-molded bits of builders merchant pine as I can use

no centre plate, no rudder.

door architrave is always straight knot free wood and it has a nice curve on one side. I will glue those as inner and out gunwales - I will use skirting board for the thwarts.

I might reduce the angle on the transom a fraction to make it slightly more outboard friendly.

I built one of these

http://www.selway-fisher.com/OtherDB.htm

the 15 foot coble


The aim is to steer with a paddle and use the optimist rig I use on sweet pea and the duck punt

The big cobles come with a pair of skegs on the stern so that they sit upright. I had them on mine I will add a small pair of those - so that I can drag the dinghy across the hard without damaging the hull and it will also reduce leeway quite a bit.

The old 15 foot coble sailed on rails. Built the bugger way too heavy - I will not repeat that mistake -



I need to be able to get this dinghy on and off the car roof single handed.

The other thing I like about sweet pea is that she is clinker - which I think grips the water better than a rounded thing. She also had outboard rowlocks - which makes her nice to row.

I also have the cleats on the outside of the hull - they are backing plates for the screws which go from the outside to the thwarts. They also line up with the roof bars on the roof rack. I use them to secure the fenders which act as floatation and also stop the tender from bumping into things. I think they turn away a lot of spray - certainly when under power and possibly under tow

can I get away with 4mm ply in the top panels?


D

Tom3
12-11-2016, 01:53 PM
Those are very attractive boats, and the build should be faster(I've never built a stitch and glue). I know weight is an issue but the extra foot on the 10'6", would make a big difference in performance. You know what you can deal with. I can't say on the ply thickness, I'm sure there is good advice here on that. When do you start?

dylan winter
12-11-2016, 01:59 PM
Those are very attractive boats, and the build should be faster(I've never built a stitch and glue). I know weight is an issue but the extra foot on the 10'6", would make a big difference in performance. You know what you can deal with. I can't say on the ply thickness, I'm sure there is good advice here on that. When do you start?

as soon as I can persuade Jon that he should clear a space in his shed and make sure that everything is ready to roll.

Jan or feb I reckon.

By making two we can halve the labour in lofting the panels

I will try cable ties as stitches.

D

Peerie Maa
12-11-2016, 02:08 PM
Dylan, without the cb you should increase the depth of the two drafts and add a keel to the forefoot forward to give them some lateral resistance.
http://www.ebedejong.nl/Coble/coble_drawing_parts.JPG

dylan winter
12-11-2016, 02:15 PM
Dylan, without the cb you should increase the depth of the two drafts and add a keel to the forefoot forward to give them some lateral resistance.
http://www.ebedejong.nl/Coble/coble_drawing_parts.JPG

thanks for the image

now I know the proper name for them.


so will they sail as well sweet pea

the big coble tracked really well

but then she a plate and a huge rudder - this will have neither

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-11-2016, 02:36 PM
Take care picking your architrave - some of the stuff I've seen recently has a good supply of knots and can come with some handy pre-made bends....

Stair tread or window board looks like the call for thwarts.

keith66
12-11-2016, 03:06 PM
I seem to remember posting on here before but Edwin Monks "Stubby" design is a great little tender, here is a link to it, https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=n0t6TOZuQw4C&pg=PA28&lpg=PA28&dq=edwin+monk+stubby&source=bl&ots=ABSRroD8ko&sig=IN-9IZPgNZmkLWgelLj1l9En4pI&hl=en&ei=Cms4TvXGKYuEhQelw_yJAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CCgQ6AEwAjgK#v=onepage&q&f=false , scroll down a page or two for the plans.

If building one of these it pays to raise the sheer at the bow an inch & about 1 1/2" at the stern, my current one has a 5/16" bottom & 1/4" topsides. One of these or her sister won Benfleet yacht clubs rowing race for about 20 years running.

Peerie Maa
12-11-2016, 03:42 PM
thanks for the image

now I know the proper name for them.


Also called scorvels on a different bit of the coast.

WX
12-11-2016, 05:05 PM
Hi Dylan just wanted to say enjoying series 5...bout half way through them and looking forward to series 6.:)
You wouldn't like my tender.

dylan winter
12-11-2016, 07:02 PM
Hi Dylan just wanted to say enjoying series 5...bout half way through them and looking forward to series 6.:)
You wouldn't like my tender.

thanks WX,

I cannot bare to look back at the old films

send pix of tender and then I will tell you what I think of it

not that my opinion counts a squit on any place on earth let alone my own house.

I will make the scorvels long enough to stop the prop from grounding when I motor up the shore

this could well turn out to be the perfect tender

D

StevenBauer
12-11-2016, 08:36 PM
I think the 10'6" Coble wIll be great but I'd build her glued lap rather than stitch and glue. It'd be easier to do and stronger, too. Maybe not enough strakes to go with 4mm.



Steven

Zuri
12-11-2016, 08:44 PM
^ Yes I'm with Steven, I'd build her glued lap too.

Good luck with your build Dylan. Hope you post here with your 1-week build. I'd definitely follow that.

Also, you do such a great job with KTL, I'd love to see a nice dinghy, of your own make, out on the river and your other sailing grounds. Is this mainly for your Westerly? Or, will you be using it in punting grounds too?

Travis.

WX
12-11-2016, 08:45 PM
This my little ugly duckling, it goes by the name of Beetle.
http://i1221.photobucket.com/albums/dd476/mtwarning/tender/20150130_100812_zpstz8jqeku.jpg
Some friends trying it out...they proclaimed it a good rower.
http://i1221.photobucket.com/albums/dd476/mtwarning/tender/20150314_170319_zpsylpuleod.jpg
I built it stitch and tape though it was supposed to be ply on frame. I left out a mould in the foresheets and that's why it's a bit hollow cheeked.

dylan winter
12-12-2016, 02:04 AM
This my little ugly duckling, it goes by the name of Beetle.
http://i1221.photobucket.com/albums/dd476/mtwarning/tender/20150130_100812_zpstz8jqeku.jpg
Some friends trying it out...they proclaimed it a good rower.
http://i1221.photobucket.com/albums/dd476/mtwarning/tender/20150314_170319_zpsylpuleod.jpg
I built it stitch and tape though it was supposed to be ply on frame. I left out a mould in the foresheets and that's why it's a bit hollow cheeked.

well

it certainly brings a happy degree of functionality to the aesthetics.

D

WX
12-12-2016, 02:14 AM
well

it certainly brings a happy degree of functionality to the aesthetics.

D


It's actually a stack and stow but I discovered two things when I tried to stow it on deck.
1 It wouldn't stow under the boom.
2 It was impossible to assemble on deck.
Luckily it fits perfectly in one piece. I'd like to build another one but with a fuller bow and maybe a few inches longer.

dylan winter
12-12-2016, 02:23 AM
^ Yes I'm with Steven, I'd build her glued lap too.

Good luck with your build Dylan. Hope you post here with your 1-week build. I'd definitely follow that.

Also, you do such a great job with KTL, I'd love to see a nice dinghy, of your own make, out on the river and your other sailing grounds. Is this mainly for your Westerly? Or, will you be using it in punting grounds too?

Travis.

T,

At the moment the old centaur - and usually the clinker snot dinghy - is in scotland. So I want one for around here - something I can tow to the hard behind the push bike and something that jill can row. I hope it sails as well as sweet Pea

Thanks for mentioning the Duck Punt. Have I mentioned before what splendid little boats they are - might have mentioned it, dunno, worth saying though

Build a Duck Punt lads - they are amazing little boats. The best bang for your buck of any home build boat.

go-on

decide to start today and you could have her done in a week.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cvMqAhk1PPc

free plans here

http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/blogs/ktl-vlog-duck-punt-01-plans-arrive/

WX
12-12-2016, 02:40 AM
Finished series 5. Loved the engine mount replacement.
Any particular reason why you don't like the early videos?
Sorry about the thread drift but I'm curious.

dylan winter
12-12-2016, 02:42 AM
Finished series 5. Loved the engine mount replacement.
Any particular reason why you don't like the early videos?
Sorry about the thread drift but I'm curious.

I see all the duff fades and jumped frames and decide that I really should re-edit them - but know that I never will.

WX
12-12-2016, 03:22 AM
They're fine Dylan as they are. To chase perfect will only lead to a life of disappointment. Hell I still aspire to your early ones:)
Downloaded the plans, thanks.

dylan winter
12-12-2016, 04:18 AM
They're fine Dylan as they are. To chase perfect will only lead to a life of disappointment. Hell I still aspire to your early ones:)
Downloaded the plans, thanks.

It would make me very happy if they infected Australia

I think that there around a score or more in the states now

they are so good for exploring billabongs

skaraborgcraft
12-12-2016, 10:55 AM
Just one thing to bare in mind if you build the coble, that there is a bit of twist in the forward lower panels that might be beyond of some cheap 3 veneer ply.

dylan winter
12-12-2016, 11:49 AM
Just one thing to bare in mind if you build the coble, that there is a bit of twist in the forward lower panels that might be beyond of some cheap 3 veneer ply.

aha - excellent point - I do remember the coble I built had one heck of a twist to get that turn on the bow

whiskeyfox
12-16-2016, 04:24 AM
One of the Spindrift designs by B&B Yachts?

I don't know how they will perform without board and rudder, but is does have a skeg.

dylan winter
12-17-2016, 02:57 AM
One of the Spindrift designs by B&B Yachts?

I don't know how they will perform without board and rudder, but is does have a skeg.

those look simple to build - but I think I need more shape to the hull to grip the water

D

George Ray
12-17-2016, 08:09 AM
Links to a couple of old dinghy threads:

http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/ossauray/aurayu09.jpg
In 1912 Claud Worth took measurements from a punt he saw local fishermen using on the Atlantic coast in Auray, France. Philip Bolger later adapted these mesurements for plywood in his book "Boats with an Open Mind", creating a 9'9" x 4'2" plywood punt. "Small Boat Journal" published a 10' version of the "Auray punt" in number 25, July 1982. This is a one sheet version of the same punt, adjusted to be made of just one sheet of plywood. . . . . . . . .
http://koti.kapsi.fi/hvartial/ossauray/auray_u.htm




http://yachtvalhalla.net/gecko/result.jpg
Nesting-dinghy-plans-and-questions:
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?168264-Nesting-dinghy-plans-and-questions&p=3926265&highlight=#post3926265




http://ptwatercraft.com/ptwatercraft/PT11Home_files/DSC_0073.jpg
Dinghy-as-lifeboat-which-one:
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?176647-Dinghy-as-lifeboat-which-one

StevenBauer
12-19-2016, 09:08 PM
Dylan, have you looked at the Westray 9 from Selway Fisher? Stitch and glue, stem, just the right size.

http://www.selway-fisher.com/Otherupto10.htm#WESTRAY


Steven