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Paul Pless
12-01-2016, 05:56 AM
old school hoodie?

http://68.media.tumblr.com/d6afcbed3873f8565cd41472d3f95c2b/tumblr_nopan8liCU1ru7wpno1_500.jpg

Paul Pless
12-01-2016, 05:56 AM
http://68.media.tumblr.com/67eab005ca3711b7a7d76e5d7b81e0b1/tumblr_npzfgbgmXI1ru7wpno1_540.jpg

jackster
12-01-2016, 07:59 AM
old school hoodie?

http://68.media.tumblr.com/d6afcbed3873f8565cd41472d3f95c2b/tumblr_nopan8liCU1ru7wpno1_500.jpg

Nope!! That is a watchcap... and an Elizabethan Collar!? :)

TomF
12-01-2016, 08:43 AM
Nope!! That is a watchcap... and an Elizabethan Collar!? :)So, seriously "old" school. ;)

Peerie Maa
12-01-2016, 08:54 AM
Nope!! That is a watchcap... and an Elizabethan Collar!? :)

Nah, its a hood, thrown back.
https://yeoldrenaissanceshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/300115_4_.png

TomF
12-01-2016, 09:05 AM
Made a lot of sense, in a pre-waterproof fabric time. As one such hood got sopping wet, it still provided protection to the shoulders of the clothing beneath. And could be removed/traded out with another (dry) hood while the first recovered. Also meant that if a hood wore out, the whole coat didn't need to be overhauled ... and if the coat wore out, you still had a hood to wear over the new one.

I noticed recently that a version of this thing has been "invented" again to be sold to people who do stuff outdoors in the Winter. The item is now intended to go inside your coat, and replace a scarf and hat. I like the Elizabethan version a lot better, and actually could see myself wearing something like it if I ever worked on my own outdoors.

jackster
12-01-2016, 09:12 AM
Nah, its a hood, thrown back.
https://yeoldrenaissanceshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/300115_4_.png

Blimey!! I do believe 'es got it!!!
So,yea, Seriously "Old School" I think.
And the riving is pretty old , too.

Peerie Maa
12-01-2016, 09:16 AM
Made a lot of sense, in a pre-waterproof fabric time. As one such hood got sopping wet, it still provided protection to the shoulders of the clothing beneath. And could be removed/traded out with another (dry) hood while the first recovered. Also meant that if a hood wore out, the whole coat didn't need to be overhauled ... and if the coat wore out, you still had a hood to wear over the new one.

I noticed recently that a version of this thing has been "invented" again to be sold to people who do stuff outdoors in the Winter. The item is now intended to go inside your coat, and replace a scarf and hat. I like the Elizabethan version a lot better, and actually could see myself wearing something like it if I ever worked on my own outdoors.

Properly fullered worsted wool, with some of the lanolin left in will turn water. The fibres bulk up and tighten the weave. The same property was employed in boatmen's gansies, knitted on thin pins out of two ply worsted.

TomF
12-01-2016, 09:20 AM
Depending on the intensity of the rain. ;)

I wonder if they still come in Sherwood Green?

TomF
12-01-2016, 10:02 AM
250 per for the Purdy version. Maybe Robin Hood filched his from some Aristocrat. :D

CWSmith
12-01-2016, 10:30 AM
Amazing! I've split logs with wedges, but that's the first time I've seen someone split off a board that way. That is fascinating to see.

TomF
12-01-2016, 10:36 AM
Amazing! I've split logs with wedges, but that's the first time I've seen someone split off a board that way. That is fascinating to see.Tonewood for violins, cellos etc. is usually sold as riven wedges, taken to the center of the tree. Then the arch of the instrument top or back is carved from the thick side of the wedge.

Riven boards like that would be hella strong, considering that runout would be minimized. Probably waste a lot learning the craft, though. I've always heard that you want to maintain about equal mass on each side of something you're trying to rive, because the split wants to wander off towards the side with less mass. This guy has obviously figured out how to control that problem.

CWSmith
12-01-2016, 10:48 AM
Obviously, I have seen split logs and I have seen split green wood that is split from one end to the other using a froe or draw knife. This looks more like splitting stone. I'm pretty impressed.

TomF
12-01-2016, 10:54 AM
Me too. Mike Dunbar's book on Windsor chairs talks at length about splitting lengths of green wood from logs for the arms, legs and spindles he uses. He's the guy who I read most recently making the case for "equal mass" on each side of the froe.

Those wedges are, as you say, more like setting feathers to split stone.

amish rob
12-01-2016, 10:55 AM
I have never riven boards that long, but my buddy and I spent a few years learning how to split boards out of trees rather than saw them. I got pretty good at oak, and wicked good at pine. I still,will rive short pieces of pine when I'm going "whole-hog" hand made.
All hand worked wood, and hand made nails will make people fork over loot, you know?;)

Mostly, we had time and no money.

I envy him all those glorious little wedges.

Mostly, though, I want one of those Hoods! :)

Peace,
Robert

Garret
12-01-2016, 10:58 AM
I've watched a master shingle (shake, if you prefer) maker at work - but they are split from the end, not the side. I was impressed with him - but this is even more amazing.

Gerarddm
12-01-2016, 11:00 AM
Looks like the beginning of a giant sitar. ;-)

Paul Pless
12-01-2016, 11:04 AM
careful with that axe eugene


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y12PN8gaQ4Y

amish rob
12-01-2016, 11:05 AM
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h62/kitchenfiddle/IMG_1291_zps5vt349ob.jpg (http://s61.photobucket.com/user/kitchenfiddle/media/IMG_1291_zps5vt349ob.jpg.html)
Yes, this was froe riven, so not as awesome as a whole log slab, but still. My old drafting toolbox, and everything is hand work. No electricity was harmed in the making of this box, and no money was spent. :)

These are both good things when you are a poor artisan starting out...

Peace,
Robert

TomF
12-01-2016, 11:20 AM
Love me those bearded axes in Paul's video. :D

amish rob
12-01-2016, 11:40 AM
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h62/kitchenfiddle/IMG_1292_zpsdhghoiok.jpg (http://s61.photobucket.com/user/kitchenfiddle/media/IMG_1292_zpsdhghoiok.jpg.html)
More proof I am merely a small time imitator. :)

Peace,
Robert

Paul Pless
12-01-2016, 11:42 AM
did you make that?

amish rob
12-01-2016, 11:47 AM
Me oui, sir. I had a TON of help heating and pounding and shaping the head. Gosh, it's been eons. Maybe '98?

It really helps if you know a smith, or farrier, or someone handy with steel. :)

Aside from my block plane, it is my favorite tool.

Peace,
Robert

gilberj
12-01-2016, 11:58 AM
I have split fence rails. I never had enough wedges. Green wood splits more easily, but seasoned wood can be really hard. Cedar Shakes are relatively easy because you do not go as long, mostly something like 2 feet+ .
I have done some blanks for instrument making with my son who builds violins, guitars and mandolins.

Paul Pless
12-01-2016, 12:05 PM
I have split fence rails. same here
and got the carpal tunnel syndrome to go with

i don't have a saw mill in michigan - i have access to bandmills in alabama

i do come across logs that i would like to get lumber out from time to time though
so i split these, usually into quarters and then run them through my shop bandsaw
sure beats trying to mill them with a chainsaw

i'll never split rails production style again though

Chip-skiff
12-01-2016, 02:48 PM
I have split fence rails. I never had enough wedges. Green wood splits more easily, but seasoned wood can be really hard. Cedar Shakes are relatively easy because you do not go as long, mostly something like 2 feet+ .

The proper tool for riving shakes is a froe:

http://www.retiredtractors.com/tools/pix/TheFroe2.jpg
I found one in a junk shop in Missoula and it was a lovely tool, but there's not much call for shakes in these galvanised wrinkle-tin parts, so I gave it to a chap from Alaska, who has made good use of it on the native cedar.

Garret
12-01-2016, 02:50 PM
Eric Sloane I presume? What talent.

amish rob
12-01-2016, 02:51 PM
^How I made my box parts...;)

Peace,
Robert

skuthorp
12-01-2016, 03:04 PM
I recently set up a display at a heritage farm involving froes, shingles, clap boards etc. Hardwoods are a slightly more difficult matter, you need the right species of eucalyptus and log to start.

Re traditional rainwear, a Mino is a Japanese rice straw cape.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2e/Mino.JPG/1024px-Mino.JPG

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSdD5oMwAODjy2T99xN-QE1sUGTtkWPLz8qCuxGLdPt6gdH8-bt

gilberj
12-01-2016, 03:23 PM
The proper tool for riving shakes is a froe:

http://www.retiredtractors.com/tools/pix/TheFroe2.jpg
I found one in a junk shop in Missoula and it was a lovely tool, but there's not much call for shakes in these galvanised wrinkle-tin parts, so I gave it to a chap from Alaska, who has made good use of it on the native cedar.

Yes I have a couple of froe's....would that be like two and froe??

Paul Pless
12-01-2016, 03:24 PM
i had never seen the cooper's froe before
thanks for posting that

TomF
12-01-2016, 03:39 PM
Yes I have a couple of froe's....would that be like two and froe??It's a real shame that the forum's not able to capture groans or actual laughter.

birlinn
12-01-2016, 03:51 PM
I'll froe in the towel then.