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Todd D
10-22-2016, 02:01 PM
Personally I own a wooden boat for two reasons.

First I wanted a particular style of boat built primarily on the 20s and 30s. So the natural thing to do was to buy an old woody of the style I wanted. I like the idea of preserving an 80+ year old boat.

Second I enjoy working with wood and wanted to restore an old wooden boat. I also wanted to learn the needed skills.

I have no interest in building a modern wooden boat since the idea of owning a piece of history is a big part of the attraction for me. I also wanted to own something more than a skiff or small open boat. That is one of the reasons I went for a 33' boat. Another factor in picking the boat I did was cost. I was able to buy my boat for very little money. The restoration was also quite cheap. The result is that I now have a much nicer boat than I could have afforded (i.e., talked my wife into).

Peerie Maa
10-22-2016, 02:24 PM
I too enjoy working with wood. I built my first two boats myself, then Peerie Maa turned up at the right time. As I am fascinated with how wood goes together to create a hull she was perfect for me.

Working with glass make me itch.

David G
10-22-2016, 03:01 PM
Three reasons for me --

1. I'm a woodworker for a reason... I love working with wood.

2. It's in my blood. Grew up in a place with tons of boats. I was, literally, on a wooden boat the day after I was born.

3. The people you meet are tons interesting.

jsjpd1
10-22-2016, 03:04 PM
I own wooden boats for a few reasons.

One, I like pretty boats and being around them in a beautiful setting brings me joy.

Two, I've always been a bit of a history buff and old wooden boats appeal to that sense of connection with the past. I feel the same way about my old hand tools. It's kind of fun going to the museum and noting that my old tool collection matches theirs, but mine is still in use.

Three, keeping and caring for old wooden boats helps to keep alive a skill set and knowledge that seems to be fading away. I think it's something worth saving and passing along.

Four, I work in an office all day (hey, that pencil won't push itself). Wooden boats connect me to real physical work and that is good for the soul.

Phil Y
10-22-2016, 03:14 PM
No one will buy her from me;)

Gerarddm
10-22-2016, 03:38 PM
Because I wanted a particular design.

Because I am a glutton for punishment. ;-)

Ian McColgin
10-22-2016, 03:38 PM
I got into wooden boats as the only way I could get a functional sailing boat I could live aboard. The glass boats I liked were out of my financial league.

Phil Y
10-22-2016, 03:40 PM
Really it's a thing I got from my dad. He was always into wooden boats.

phiil
10-22-2016, 03:47 PM
I don't own a wooden boat. It owns me.

skuthorp
10-22-2016, 03:54 PM
Because if it breaks I can fix it.

RFNK
10-22-2016, 04:52 PM
They're more beautiful and much more pleasurable to work on. As above, you meet lots of interesting people.

Rick

Willin'
10-22-2016, 05:02 PM
I was afraid I was accumulating too much money.

sailcanoefan
10-22-2016, 09:32 PM
I built my wooden sailboat because a new sailboat made of glass is too much $$$.

And very often, many used boat are crap.

I bought plan from M. DN Goodchild and built my boat from 2012 to 2015when she was launch.

Sailed her this summer 2016 and the boat is nice to sail and cozy to sleep in the cabin. Still working on it for improvements like a new rudder, a kick up rudder, gave more strength to tabernacle, change pulleys.....

Like Bernard Moitessier said: ''A boat is never completely finished'' Well, I think he was right !!!!

wizbang 13
10-22-2016, 10:01 PM
coffee tastes better aboard of them
beer too

Hugh MacD
10-23-2016, 12:05 AM
Playing with wood smells better than fiberglass.

Infinite
10-23-2016, 01:57 AM
People kept telling me how bad ferro boat's are so i got a free 50ft wooden hull!!! what a deal!.

jsjpd1
10-23-2016, 02:41 AM
People kept telling me how bad ferro boat's are so i got a free 50ft wooden hull!!! what a deal!.

So how is the owning of a fifty foot wooden boat going?

Rapelapente
10-23-2016, 03:22 AM
I felt in love with wooden boats at 8 years old, when my parents decided to settle down in Cannes in 1962. Already tons on wooden boats in the harbor at this time. Spent hours eyeballing these beauties.
Was the only one to face this desease in my family.
And for my schooner addiction, the culprit is Captain Troy :d

capehorn3
10-23-2016, 04:46 AM
I like working with wood also and wanted a boat that wasn't produced so I made it.

Reynard38
10-23-2016, 07:58 AM
Got Jan Adkins book when I was a kid. Wanted once ever since.
That book also gave me an itch for a catboat. I be scratching that one as soon as the Knickerbocker sells.

Ive still got that book BTW.

kenjamin
10-23-2016, 08:11 AM
It's fun to build something that puts a smile on people's faces. I get compliments on my boat at the boat launch, on the water, or when she's sitting on the trailer at a gas station. In Brownsville, Texas at a gas station more than a thousand miles from my home, a huge burly mountain of a man came up to me and said "pretty boat!" and gave a thumbs up sign – wasn't expecting that comment from that guy. I had to chuckle a little bit.

I'm also in the strange habit of making wood and goo do things that are a bit out of the ordinary. Once you get a good feel for what wood and goo can do, the only limit to what you can build is your own imagination.

There is an abundance of scrap top-quality spruce available from the light aircraft industry and it sure is fun to make masts with it. (Hope I didn't just run the price of that scrap upwards.)

http://www.bodaciousboats.com/BirdwingSideview.jpg

sailcanoefan
10-23-2016, 09:00 AM
Playing with wood smells better than fiberglass.

I agree 200%

rbgarr
10-23-2016, 12:06 PM
We found a wood powerboat that was just the right design, yet is composite-built with the exterior epoxied cloth covered and painted. Best of all worlds as far as we're concerned. Maintenance is necessary and worthwhile but isn't what we own a boat for. It's using it as much and as often as possible, year 'round. Will likely be getting a 'companion' sailboat soon, built the same way by the same guy.

nedL
10-23-2016, 03:44 PM
I grew up in a wooden boat family. I have always enjoyed wood working, and wood working on wooden boats isn't all straight pieces and 90 degree angles,..it's more fun. Also, I grew up on the Jersey shore where there is a good 175 yr + history of lapstrake boat building, and I have a real intregue in that history, so it sort of follows that. And wooden boats are unique. With Fiberglas boats you almost have to check the names on the transom to make sure you are stepping aboard the right one, not so with a wooden one. They are warmer and homier to be aboard. And the aromatic smell of Jersey white cedar through a planer beats a grinder on glass any day.

earling2
10-23-2016, 03:53 PM
I love traditional coastal boats. Swampscotts, whitehalls, peapods, Friendships and guideboats etc generally look god awful in glass because the crisp details get lost in the plug and the interiors look bare and ugly


I'm also a much better wood worker if it isn't all about "plumb" and "square"

AndyG
10-23-2016, 06:02 PM
Aged eleven - a rather disturbing 42 years ago - I realised that the smell of droplets-of-water-on-varnish in the early morning sunshine, the sound of a raised jib frapping during a launch in perfect weather; the sheer, functional look of a wooden racing dinghy, and the knowledge that I was both responsible and capable enough to send this thing around a course and potentially win was one of my life's defining moments. I'd grown up on Ransome. Sailing and wood are, and will always be, inseparable.

Andy

billsan
10-23-2016, 06:45 PM
I love the look of them, the feel of the wood and the fact that it is something that I will have created. I cant wait for the feeling to be out on the water on a boat that I created by myself with my boys, it's something I think about almost daily. I am hooked and always will be and am already looking to build a cruiser once I get the beg meil finished up.

Infinite
10-23-2016, 06:47 PM
So how is the owning of a fifty foot wooden boat going?
now my hartley 16 is finished and back at the yacht club ive been down there working on it the last 2 days, updates to come soon!

Chris-on-the-Boat
10-23-2016, 10:53 PM
Because there is nothing else that gives me as much joy that my wife will actually let me do.

chilt
10-24-2016, 08:26 AM
Don't own one yet, but working on it. Slow progress, but hope to start moving faster soon. Wooden boats have soul.

Don
Future Simmons Sea Skiff owner

capefox
10-24-2016, 10:23 AM
I live in Utah and the supply of used sailing dinghies is slim pickings. Sometimes a well-worn Lido 14 or Catalina 14.2 comes up in the classifies but it's very hit and miss. I've always like the idea of building a lovely looking wooden vessel and I'm glad I followed through. Building enabled me to create exactly what I wanted: the Argie 15 sailing dinghy. My family, friends, and neighbors have thoroughly enjoyed sailing and fishing on our boat. Wood has a beauty and appeal to people that fiberglass never will. At the marina, it's very common for people to want to look at our boat and touch the varnished surfaces. It's as if the bright wood possesses some sort of magical appeal.

gregleetaylor
10-24-2016, 10:54 AM
...very enjoyable thread, thanks to all. A universal appreciation to those fortunate enough to have it.

SmileAndWave
10-24-2016, 11:36 AM
I grew up on and around the water, and my father owned wooden boats and then he eventually made one himself. I love the smell, sound, and feel of working with wood, and building my boat is stress relief.

chas
10-24-2016, 11:41 AM
I bought a nice little diesel engine and the old boat came with it. :D / Jim

artif
10-24-2016, 12:23 PM
Wood splinters are much nicer than glass splinters.
Proper wood boats (plywood doesn't count, sorry) just feel better, can't explain it.

capefox
10-24-2016, 02:04 PM
And the aromatic smell of Jersey white cedar through a planer beats a grinder on glass any day.
So true. The other day I was working on some white oak and cedar for a project when my 4 y/o daughter walked into the garage and remarked, "It smells like a happy forest in here." That was her amusing way of explaining that the smell, feel, and appearance of many wood species is lovely to the human species.

amish rob
10-24-2016, 02:13 PM
I'm not sure mine count. Just a few skin on frame boats and plywood ones.

I own them because I built them. Well, the kids helped on a few. :)

Peace,
Robert

Roger Cumming
10-24-2016, 04:46 PM
I like the clicking sound made by the roller bearings in the wood blocks when I ease the mainsheet.....

Oldad
10-25-2016, 08:20 AM
Why? Mostly because there was nothing in the GRP market for the boat I wanted. My BUNKY is a cross between a Handy Billy and a Ninegret and FESTIVUS is a 22 foot houseboat with an 8 by 9 foot cabin and a huge open cockpit forward. Nothing like either one on the market. Had to build. Wood, mostly marine ply, material of choice. The houseboat lives at a mooring all summer, rarely moves, is the summer camp I could not otherwise afford.

lupussonic
10-25-2016, 11:12 AM
Wood is a traditional material that goes back way further than any other material in boat building. When I look at something made from wood, I cannot help but think of the hand that made it, so it's a connection to human craft as much as anything for me. In an age of virtual relationships with the world, that means a lot to me.

Whilst I can appreciate the solidity and dryness of a steel hull, metal is hot, cold, sharp, hard, smelly and hellishly noisy and unforgiving to work with.

Fibreglass is full of heavy chemicals, and 10% as satisfying to work with. Nobody ever said 'hey that's a lovely bucket of epoxy you have there'..

Wood has an inherent beauty, is widely available, readily worked with minimal tools, and connects me to historical trades and traditional practices.

Sky Blue
10-25-2016, 03:24 PM
A traditional wooden sailboat, especially as it may be derived from the work boats of Britain, represent the culmination of centuries of design development where consequences were measured in the lives of men. Inasmuch as that is so, I believe the derivatives are representative of the finest small boats ever conceived. That a vessel and rig developed for oystering and fishing, and used that way for 60 years out of the same harbor, might on refit confidently set off for some of the least known places on earth, is final testament to this belief, considering that voyaging was not in the design brief for these astonishingly capable vessels. And so they are beautiful, too, in the way that smart is sexy. The aesthetic rests, in part, in notions of this capability, which a boatman can discern with a glance, and which he can feel, simply by stepping aboard.

Michael D. Storey
10-25-2016, 03:38 PM
It was free.
I can fix it.
I like how it smells.

BrianM
10-25-2016, 03:55 PM
Why? Because every time I try and chop down a fiberglass tree, I get itchy skin and stuff in my eyes.

Michael D. Storey
10-25-2016, 04:30 PM
Why? Because every time I try and chop down a fiberglass tree, I get itchy skin and stuff in my eyes.I chopped down a white oak and Christ did my skin itch. Some kinda vine, I guess.

Robbie 2
10-25-2016, 09:10 PM
I could build it and did.
I can afford it but couldn't afford a boat built from anything else.
It feels nice in the water and is quiet, good when fishing.

Toolate
10-25-2016, 09:18 PM
Idle hands and long winter with no fiberglass boats in the water ;). Plus I hate my rubber inflatable so building a replacement. And my wife tolerates this activity....

Timo8188
10-25-2016, 10:41 PM
Wooden boats...

1. look great and feel warm

2. get many admirers

3. are more fun to build and easier to modify

4. can be burned when they get too old

Ted Hoppe
10-26-2016, 08:50 AM
It really does come down to economy and beauty. I can generally afford many of the boats i have admired before at a distance. The generational change of boat ownership and boat styles has opened a wonderful exploration of boat caretakership. I have or have owned some wonderful boats that when new i could have never afforded.

Moreover with a wooden boat there is always something to do. I like the time i take to look, touch, restore and repair as it is a break from my working world.
On the other hand - my lovely wife would like me to spend more time with her and the family instead. To tell you the truth, she makes a great point.

spirit
10-26-2016, 11:00 AM
All of the above, plus two.

First, my earliest memory, at age 4, is of sitting on my bedroom floor surrounded by wooden blocks in the shape of a boat. I have been dreaming about wooden boats ever since, designing them, looking at them, and now, finally, building...

Second, I take my family of 14 to Squam Lake for a week every summer. I wanted to design and build a trailerable boat with excellent stability, capacity and shallow draft, that would plane efficiently at 25 knots with 25 HP. My first was a Bolger style 5 x 18-foot flat bottomed skiff, that has exceeded my expectations in every way, including grace. Four teenagers can sit on one gunnel with aplomb.

My second boat will be a 5 x 16-foot skiff with a 20 HP motor and a radical bottom. I will bring it to the Mystic boat show if it performs as expected. Obviously I am not someone who would be happy without designing my own.

TomZ
10-26-2016, 01:50 PM
the voice of the waves lapping her wooden hull,
the easy way she moves and slices thru,
the coolness of her cabin on a blistering day
and her warmth on a blustery one.
I built her, I can fix her
she's unique, an historal echo,
she's mine.

Jim Oppy
10-26-2016, 03:58 PM
Because I'm anti-plastic.

Seriously we are choking ourselves on our own needless waste. I rebel. No plastic.

The best we can hope for is to ensnare it all with currents and floating barriers in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, which will become the earths colon.

http://www.plasticoceans.org/

simmons22
12-14-2017, 03:13 PM
Tom Simmons, creator of the Simmons Sea Skiff, says it best, I think - "....if God had wanted us to build plastic boats, he'd have made plastic trees..."
(well, he did say something close to it...."enough people don't like fiberglass to keep me in business". Close enough!)

Powerwagon
12-14-2017, 03:31 PM
My wooden boat is just a production built plywood cabin cruiser. The construction is not of the finest quality, the fit and finish is nice but not amazing. It reminds me of the boats I liked growing up, living on a 40' Laurent Giles wooden double ender with my folks.

The restoration/repowering is also a way for my father, in his early 70s, to teach me some of the skills he has taken a lifetime to accumulate. I enjoy working with wood and learning/honing my skills, with hand tools and power tools. We have a great time working together.

Many of the active small boats on the Columbia River are made of aluminum. They are often cold, noisy, jarring, and ugly. The hulls are slab sided with no sheer, the windshields and cabins are boxy and have ugly square windows. The interior frame welds are visible through the hull. The ClipperCraft I am repairing has beautiful lines, pretty windows, and warm mahogany trim. :)

Jay Greer
12-14-2017, 04:01 PM
It is almost an indefinable thing, a wooden boat! For me, it breaths, lives and instills all the blood, sweat, love and tears all those who built and those who have sailed her, experienced in her life and creation. From those who felled and worked the trees, the one who conceieved and designed her, the craftsmen who were really artists to those who have lived with and cared for her. It all goes into making a wooden boat a living breathing work of art!
Jay

peb
12-14-2017, 05:42 PM
Because I can get the boat I want.

Sent from my BLN-L24 using Tapatalk

Bruce Brown
12-14-2017, 06:16 PM
Wood just doesn't seem to contribute to the entropy of the planet like FG and there's a sense of sculpture that comes from working in wood that just doesn't exist with other materials.

richbeck
12-14-2017, 06:42 PM
Because I could build a boat that I could never afford for buy. 10,000 hours + later I am enjoying it.

Dave Hadfield
12-14-2017, 07:35 PM
Initially I bought a wooden yacht because the kids were growing bigger and I couldn't afford a larger FG one than the 26-ft boat we had. As it turned out, it was one of the best things I ever did, period.

Long before that though, I'd built wooden canoes.

Just feels right, I guess.

Alan H
12-14-2017, 08:32 PM
Because I was seduced by really gorgeous pictures on this forum during a period where I didn't have a boat at all.

wsgilliam
12-14-2017, 08:39 PM
I read one time that wood boats at least have the dignity to rot and return to dust. Does it for me.

LISC
12-14-2017, 08:56 PM
1. I hate money
2. I have rose tinted memories of comraderie from the 70's when I was a kid hanging out at the boat yard and everyone pitching in to get boats launched by Memorial Day weekend. I used to paint boats instead of delivering newspapers. God knows how much lead dust I inhaled - probably explains a lot!
3. I have had 3 fiberglass cruisers and even so found myself hankering after a vintage Huckins.
4. I loved that a guy in a diesel powered Bertram tried to pass me leaving the harbor and when I pushed the throttles forward I left him in my wake at 30 knots. Ha.
5. Even though I'm a wood butcher I love working with my hands - it's my Zen and it almost keeps me sane

Portland
12-14-2017, 09:23 PM
I had always enjoyed working with wood , and made a lot of furniture with wood as a youngster.
I still have a dining table I built 53 years ago.
I always wanted to learn to sail , and fish in the sea.
The more I researched , the more I was drawn to the traditional wooden fishing boats.
And then I had the chance to learn to sail , and race , in 80 yo 'couta boats , which enthralled me.
When I sailed and raced in FG TS boats of the same size , I just didn't enjoy it , and couldn't wait to get off the things.
In time I bought a Grey Seal , and was in heaven.
I loved the feel of the boat , I loved its aura , its character.
Because of my growing physical limitations , I had to sell her , but the seed has been sown , I'm still dabbling in SOF boats .
Give me a good wooden boat anyday.
Let me work with wood , boatbuilding , anyday. I love the smell , the feel of wood.
Rob J.

Alan H
12-14-2017, 09:53 PM
PS: I don't hate fiberglass boats.

PPS: I like sailing significantly more than I like building and fixing stuff. I build and fix stuff because it allows me to sail in ways I might not be able to, if I didn't build and fix.

Matt young
12-14-2017, 10:05 PM
- It was the easiest way I could build what I wanted, and want next

- Wood is pretty, comfortable, can be local, sometimes free, strong, versital, and often light weight

- I really like wood that is covered in plastic though. At least on the bottom side of things. Epoxy sounds so much better than plastic

- I don’t bash plastic boats, and won’t be saying “frozen snot” oh wait I just said it! Ok that was the last time, maybe

Aquinian
12-14-2017, 10:22 PM
Grew up sailing on weekends (we were farmers, 100 miles from the coast). I read Joshua Slocum's book "Sailing Alone Around the World" as a teenager. So there you go. It really couldn't have ended any other way, could it?

Garret
12-14-2017, 10:57 PM
No one's mentioned my reason: I ain't too bright.

I have loved the grace of boats from the turn of the century up through the 40's for most all my life. I'll never forget the first NY 40 I saw at about age 8! In 1997 I saw a boat in a yard & turned to a friend & said "Someday I'll own a boat like that." She laughed. In 1999 I bought a boat & after I bought her realized that it was that boat. Either kismet, or maybe just the reason above...

I hugely admire those who build their own, but I love keeping a beautiful old boat going. Well - most of the time.

Bernadette
12-15-2017, 12:35 AM
nothing beats working with timber.

Small boats rock
12-15-2017, 07:08 AM
Whether sailing, hanging on the hook, or building in the shed, wooden boats just feel so good. It is often said that a boat is a living thing... but personally I only experience that sense of the boat being alive with wooden boats... maybe that's also related to my feeling of safety and being looked after in wooden boats... dunno... how can one describe an intuitive response in mere words...

I have nothing against plastic boats either, but I'm going to say 'frozen snot' because it makes me laugh... frozen snot, frozen snot, frozen snot... he he heeeee

peb
12-15-2017, 10:11 AM
No one's mentioned my reason: I ain't too bright.

.

I should have put that as part of my reason also. There are lots of good fiberglass boats that I could use for my purpose now.

My kids make fun of me and tell me its just because I like everyone stopping me on the dock or other boats sailing by telling me what a gorgeous boat I have. That may be part of it, but at times I actually get tired of having to answer all the questions.

Garret
12-15-2017, 10:47 AM
...My kids make fun of me and tell me its just because I like everyone stopping me on the dock or other boats sailing by telling me what a gorgeous boat I have. That may be part of it, but at times I actually get tired of having to answer all the questions.

I agree! Sometimes it's fun - others a PITA. It worked to my advantage one time: pulled into Provincetown & the harbormaster came out & pointed me to a mooring. "That's a beautiful boat! How long is she?". "52" I said. "Nope - she's 50." he replied. I chose not to argue & glad I didn't. Mooring rates there are $20/night more for boats over 50'.

the_gr8t_waldo
12-15-2017, 01:37 PM
It followed me home.

ersin boke
12-15-2017, 01:46 PM
I own a wooden boat because lot of reason familiar written here. But I have another reason;

She make me famous in Turkey.. Because no one use gaff cutter wooden boat in Turkey.. All marinas know my boat, and help me.. All the harbours that I stopped minimum 5 peope come and request permission to take photo..

I have I funny story last summer.

I was anchored at Bodrum , Turkey. Aproximately 9 hours a.m. I was preparing my Turkish caffee and I prepare this coffee according to Ottoman style. I mean I used traditional brass coffee mill .. I was preparing my cofffe in the boat and Two ledies swimming near my old style wooden boat. One of woman called me and she said ' life is good for you '

I think she smells the fresh coffee.. Ofcourse as a Gentleman, I invite them to my boat. We drink Turkish coffee with them. One of them docror and other is lawyer.. They spend aproximateliy an hour with me and thet invite me to their hotels for bereakfast next day..

Think that aproximately 2 weeks I was at sea I did not see any human.. Both of these ledies comes to me just like the most beatuful women in the world :)

What a unlucky man I am.. You guys can not imagine what was happened at that night..

Earthquake ... 6,2 magnitiude..

All the peope leaved the Bodrum , ofcourse my beatuful ladies either.. :)

Rich Jones
12-15-2017, 02:37 PM
I own and build wooden boats for the sheer joy of it. Researching designs, planning the build and then spending a glorious couple of years building. There's nothing like it. Creating a vibrant sculpture that is a joy to behold and enjoy.
The scent of fresh cut wood, the mental challenge of making it all come together. It is in my blood.
I've built 17 boats so far and hope to hit 20 before I have to give it up.

Oldad
12-15-2017, 04:04 PM
I own a wooden boat because lot of reason familiar written here. But I have another reason;

She make me famous in Turkey.. Because no one use gaff cutter wooden boat in Turkey.. All marinas know my boat, and help me.. All the harbours that I stopped minimum 5 peope come and request permission to take photo..

I have I funny story last summer.

I was anchored at Bodrum , Turkey. Aproximately 9 hours a.m. I was preparing my Turkish caffee and I prepare this coffee according to Ottoman style. I mean I used traditional brass coffee mill .. I was preparing my cofffe in the boat and Two ledies swimming near my old style wooden boat. One of woman called me and she said ' life is good for you '

I think she smells the fresh coffee.. Ofcourse as a Gentleman, I invite them to my boat. We drink Turkish coffee with them. One of them docror and other is lawyer.. They spend aproximateliy an hour with me and thet invite me to their hotels for bereakfast next day..

Think that aproximately 2 weeks I was at sea I did not see any human.. Both of these ledies comes to me just like the most beatuful women in the world :)

What a unlucky man I am.. You guys can not imagine what was happened at that night..

Earthquake ... 6,2 magnitiude..

23qAll the peope leaved the Bodrum , ofcourse my beatuful ladies either.. :)

I am convinced. I will buy a wooden boat. A gaff rigged cutter. I will grind my own beans and dream of beautiful ladies swimming by. I would. I would do it if I were 20 or even 30, but at 80, I can only dream....

Garret
12-15-2017, 04:10 PM
I am convinced. I will buy a wooden boat. A gaff rigged cutter. I will grind my own beans and dream of beautiful ladies swimming by. I would. I would do it if I were 20 or even 30, but at 80, I can only dream....

Who knew they were babe magnets? :)

You already have yours anyway...

Steamboat
12-15-2017, 04:21 PM
The outside world of non-wooden boat owners/builders say we are eccentric! But why be boring.

Garret
12-15-2017, 04:24 PM
The outside world of non-wooden boat owners/builders say we are eccentric! But why be boring.

Even more - why be normal?

Steamboat
12-15-2017, 04:43 PM
Even more - why be normal?I had assumed none of us were normal. . .

Alan H
12-15-2017, 04:45 PM
This thread, to my surprise, has turned out to be really useful. Howso? I'll rephrase the OP.

--> Why the hell DO you have a wooden boat?

Same question, just written a little differently.

Garret
12-15-2017, 04:59 PM
I had assumed none of us were normal. . .

Good point!

jsjpd1
12-15-2017, 05:17 PM
This thread, to my surprise, has turned out to be really useful. Howso? I'll rephrase the OP.

--> Why the hell DO you have a wooden boat?

Same question, just written a little differently.

The harbor master called me...


and I made the mistake of answering the phone.:d

neoconocephalus
12-15-2017, 08:27 PM
The sound of wood on water ..

Small boats rock
12-15-2017, 08:45 PM
I had assumed none of us were normal. . .

I am totally normal... but I recently found out normal people are a minority group.

darroch
12-15-2017, 09:08 PM
I own a wooden boat because I bought my first WB magazine in the summer of 1999 and knew I wanted an open boat.

7331

In the back of the magazine was an ad for the plans for this one.

7332

The rest is history.

chas
12-15-2017, 09:42 PM
"The rest is history."

I've watched your videos: you really do not need to justify your position, it is self-explanatory. :D

Speaking of Don, have you heard anything from him lately? / Jim

darroch
12-15-2017, 10:25 PM
I see Don often - he's doing well - lots of things to do yet but progress is being made.
Topmast is up - rigging almost done, et cetera.

7333

chas
12-15-2017, 11:06 PM
OK. Tell him I'm waiting for that raft-up, a little further north of there. You should come too! / Jim

johngsandusky
12-16-2017, 09:29 AM
Many of the reasons above: cost, charm, comfort, history. But it also kind of happened to me.
My father built a wood/canvas canoe when I was four. He bought a converted wooden lifeboat when I was 10. He saved Gardner articles from National Fisherman and started buying WB with #2.
I built a Glen-L dinghy in 1988. In 1991 I was shopping for a bigger boat. I looked at glass boats, but the one that grabbed me was a 20' Pennant Sloop. I loved that boat, she was fast, handy and the only one on the bay. After that I was hooked.
I love knowing that my boat was crafted by a man rather than built in a factory mold, I know his name.

cstevens
12-16-2017, 11:15 AM
^^^ "It kind of happened to me" as well I guess. We moved aboard a wooden Matthews sedan cruiser in 1980, when I was 11. We were moored a block away from The Wooden Boat Shop in Seattle and I got a job there sweeping up and stocking shelves. Got my first wooden boat for my next birthday, a small flatiron skiff with a Seagull outboard. Pretty much all of the best moments of my childhood happened in wooden boats. I read WoodenBoat magazine every other month, and books by Pete Culler, William Garden, etc. I was a committed wooden boat nerd back then and I still am today.

Redfish
12-17-2017, 12:54 AM
The beauty, character and individuality of wooden boats have always drawn me in. The organic nature of the shape and the materials. But one of my favorite things about wooden boats is the sound of water kissing the hull. Almost like a musical instrument with a soothing tone. Nothing quite like it, its the wood, the hull has its own unique tones and sound. Its a beautiful thing.

Dusty Yevsky
12-17-2017, 01:02 AM
Who knew they were babe magnets? :)


That's why I own wooden boats. Wooden sticks get the chicks.

Lugalong
12-17-2017, 04:16 AM
Although I have always ( at least from earliest memory), considered boats to be of wooden construction; as a result of observation providing this fact, simply because craft of any other material did not feature much in my early life, it was fate that made an indelible impression when I found an abandoned old clinker boat and interest intensified. and it became a sensual experience.
Then one day while speaking to the captain of a sguarerigger in the dry-dock where he was doing underwater repairs, he asked me if I owned a “vessel”, and the truth of it dawned…….no! I had an actual boat, not just a vessel.

Rmarsh
12-17-2017, 07:19 AM
I have been working with wood professionally for over forty years. Literally hundreds of houses...frame to finish, cabinetmaking and millworking shops, now mostly custom stairways.
I built my own house at age 21, with no outside help or money... when my interest turned to boats and fishing, wood was the only way to go.
I get how some don't consider stitch and glue plywood worthy, and thats okay....I am not a purist, but practical.
I have built a strong, light and seaworthy center console boat that suits me to a tee.
Only need 60 hp to push it to 30 knts........fish all day long and use less than 5 gallons of gas.

Reynard38
12-17-2017, 08:02 AM
I have been working with wood professionally for over forty years. Literally hundreds of houses...frame to finish, cabinetmaking and millworking shops, now mostly custom stairways.
I built my own house at age 21, with no outside help or money... when my interest turned to boats and fishing, wood was the only way to go.
I get how some don't consider stitch and glue plywood worthy, and thats okay....I am not a purist, but practical.
I have built a strong, light and seaworthy center console boat that suits me to a tee.
Only need 60 hp to push it to 30 knts........fish all day long and use less than 5 gallons of gas.

I like it!

Rmarsh
12-17-2017, 09:18 AM
"Sounds familiar, but we must see more and hear more about the boat."

It was a father and son project and a pay as you go deal. Part time job income to pay for all of it.

the flip......it was designed to have a small cuddy and berth forward of the tall frame.
decided to go with an open layout and casting platform in the bow ..... better for fishing.
7363

enjoying the end results7364

Aquinian
12-19-2017, 03:53 AM
I am totally normal... but I recently found out normal people are a minority group.

Ah yes, me too! :)

signalcharlie
12-19-2017, 05:08 AM
My Grandfather worked with wood and my Father was a Carpenter's Mate in the Navy, so I guess sawdust is in my blood. My wife's ancestors were Sea Captains so boating is definitely in her blood. We like the feel, smell and sound of the wood boats, the sail setting just right and the spars creaking as they adjust. We like the clink of the water on the lapstrake runabout and the soft ride. We feel more in tune with nature in our wooden boats.

Chris Noto
12-19-2017, 05:37 AM
Some great stories, and beautiful boats, y'all. Thanks.

Here's mine:

I remember a cool spring day when I was nine years old, alone, roaming the not-quite-built-out Chicago suburb, Niles, Illinois, that was my home. I came upon a little pond, less than an acre, in the middle of a swath of bright green grass that was still only shin high.

There was a raft there, on the bank, and a pole. I donít remember pushing off, or returning to shore, but I have a crystal clear picture of being out near the center of the pond, my shoes slightly awash at times, the reflections of white cotton puff clouds surrounding me on the water.

That was my first wooden boat. Then, in the '70s, the Mother Earth News ran a story by some guy who had built a wooden sail boat on the cheap and my imagination was hooked again. Then WoodenBoat Magazine appeared, and Messing About In Boats, and I was suddenly surrounded by irresistible sketches of Phil Bolger's plywood Instant Boats. I built my 12' Teal in 1982, and still have her.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4732/27376550639_9372d8916d_c.jpg

The next build may be a bit more traditional, perhaps a Vivier's Ilur, or a Caledonia Yawl. The story goes on.

SBrookman
12-19-2017, 06:23 AM
...to ensure that I will never get bored in retirement as there is always something to build, fix, sail or row.

Also I like the challenge of turning a stack of 2 dimensional lumber into a hopefully aesthetically pleasing 3D shape that resembles a boat. Like this almost finished peapod:
http://stevebrookman.com/Boats/Peapod/inwales.jpg

gypsie
12-20-2017, 10:57 PM
There are days when i have no answer for that.
And there are days when it makes perfect sense.

7587

7588

Garret
12-20-2017, 11:00 PM
There are days when i have no answer for that.
...


The days I refer to as "What was it about this sailing thing that's supposed to be fun?" days?

However - your pics are a perfect example of how when it's good, it's very good.

pvg
12-21-2017, 01:26 AM
Not sure that I do, since someone disqualified plywood. Sure generated a lot of sawdust and plane shavings, though... and spent thousands of hours over 30 some years fly fishing for trout, salmon and steelhead, and more recently just rowing around on the lake with my wife watching the birds and animals and having picnic lunches...
pvg

len hornick
12-21-2017, 01:50 AM
60 + years ago, My first boat. A 26ft ? Seabird yawl ,Built during the depression of the 30's Well past her prime. I thought that i had bought her ,but was actually a gift ..as the payments were a portion of my allowance . She had a Palmer YT ,no transmission , No electrics save a dry cell battery for the engine ,Kero running and cabin lights a little wood/coal burning cook/heat stove. Kapok cushions . I replaced rotten wood under guidance from a local boat builder. Made a new sail of 'Vivatex' on mom's sewing machine with the guidance from Bolker and Budd ?
The Chesapeake Bay is said to have 5000 miles of navigable shoreline I did all I could to see it all
Failed the 9th and 12 grades For "Lack of interest" and being a bit late in returning from a the summers cruise.. That somehow stretched to almost Christmas
All in all Absolutely totally consuming.Nothing was like that ever again.
I have had wooden boats ever since .. Why not ??They have a soul and willing to share... "Life is short ,Eat dessert first"

Horia
10-06-2018, 01:28 AM
I have built a wooden boat because is a life quest, forges the character and it s an ancient art.
I earn my living as a surgeon and building a boat relaxes my mind and keeps my hands in action.
And it s a beautiful way of bonding with Eva and Tudor, my kids.

jstafford
10-06-2018, 08:28 AM
Bottom line, it was cheap, allowed us to get into the big boat thing for a small investment. We had given up on the idea when the boat we purchased fell in our lap. All my advisers told me not to do it but I'm kinda handy and the extra work did not scare me off, I needed a project anyway. I think I understand the scope of what I have taken on. The fact that everything is going to be harder and more costly than planned. Mistakes will be made but in the end she will be amazing.

Bill Griffin
10-06-2018, 08:41 AM
Now you will have to start a repair thread-with lots of pictures

W Grabow
10-07-2018, 10:29 AM
I own and build wooden boats for the sheer joy of it. Researching designs, planning the build and then spending a glorious couple of years building. There's nothing like it. Creating a vibrant sculpture that is a joy to behold and enjoy.
The scent of fresh cut wood, the mental challenge of making it all come together. It is in my blood.
I've built 17 boats so far and hope to hit 20 before I have to give it up.

Your answer most closely reflects my own feelings. I love the creativity of designing and building. Furniture is okay, but the curved shapes of a boat are more challenging and more beautiful.

Downwindtracker2
10-07-2018, 11:05 AM
"Fiberglass makes me itch " brought a smile to my face, twenty years later, just the thought of it, I will scratch. I find there is commonality between wooden boats and wooden gunstocks both in beauty and function. They simply work better.

Lugalong
10-07-2018, 12:53 PM
Mainly because iwoodworking is a sculptural process required to create the craft that fistlyI need to build in order to become the owner (it has always been my way of getting boats and canoes, besides one steel boat purchased in an emergency).
Although, it goes deeper than that too....... there is the connect with our very existence on this planet through the wood's origin in the trees that are the most beautiful part of our world's respiratory system.

Sensory experience also comes into it in a big way, with the feel of texture, density and vibrant resonance of the material.

Right now I cannot honestly claim to have a pure wooden boat ( because the underwater portion of my hulls are composite laminations), but this does not have much negative impact on the experience, because being on and inside my craft is about the same as the average wooden boat.
Also, plywood is a marvellous compromise in sustainable provision of hardwood surfacing, aa long as there is enough solid wood included in the framing. furnishing and trim, to enhance the solidity.

Having been around boats with metal fastened planking enough to appreciate why plywood is frowned upon (by self proclaimed purists), I nevertheless tend to accept a practical compromise of laminated veneers, as a rational solution to ownership.
When purist values are given full consideration, there is probably the need to revert to tennons or dowel pegs, along with edge to edge fibre sewing/lashing, rather than nailing.