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Paul Pless
10-06-2016, 10:29 AM
https://store-media.nytimes.com/store/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/n/s/nsapmy1603_extr.jpg

Norman Bernstein
10-06-2016, 10:30 AM
Usable ONLY in sea conditions like those shown :)

Paul Pless
10-06-2016, 10:30 AM
http://www.bullshift.net/data/images/2013/09/yacht-1906-suzanne-1911-beken.jpg

WoodyHuscarl
10-06-2016, 10:40 AM
Is that 9 or 10 sails set?

Paul Pless
10-06-2016, 10:43 AM
Check the bow wave on Susan. . .

Paul Pless
10-06-2016, 10:44 AM
and the stern wave for that matter

Paul Pless
10-06-2016, 10:47 AM
http://imagecache5d.allposters.com/watermarker/21-2152-PO5CD00Z.jpg?ch=648&cw=926

Waddie
10-06-2016, 12:34 PM
Does it take that much sail area to get this boat up to maximum displacement speed? I mean, it can't get up on plane or anything, can it?

regards,
Waddie

Paul Pless
10-06-2016, 12:39 PM
Does it take that much sail area to get this boat up to maximum displacement speed? I mean, it can't get up on plane or anything, can it?

regards,
Waddie

Light air and racing is the reason for that much sail.

John of Phoenix
10-06-2016, 12:55 PM
Gotta win a ton of money to pay that ton of canvas.

Norman Bernstein
10-06-2016, 01:05 PM
I appreciate the beauty of all of this... right up to the point where I remember that these are the toys of the Robber Barons.

Paul Pless
10-06-2016, 01:10 PM
Gotta win a ton of money to pay that ton of canvas.

They just raced for ****s&grins. . .

Hwyl
10-06-2016, 01:17 PM
Talking of oligarchs.


https://keyassets.timeincuk.net/inspirewp/live/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2015/10/white-pearl-web.jpg

Paul Pless
10-06-2016, 01:21 PM
she'll look better once they get her ballast in and she settles at her stern a bit

CWSmith
10-06-2016, 01:52 PM
she'll look better once they get her ballast in and she settles at her stern a bit

:) No she won't!

WoodyHuscarl
10-06-2016, 01:53 PM
I think the only thing that would improve its looks is a fog bank.

Chris249
10-06-2016, 04:52 PM
I appreciate the beauty of all of this... right up to the point where I remember that these are the toys of the Robber Barons.

The depressing thing about big boats and robber barons is that the modern day ones seem to be spending vastly more on their boats, adjusted for inflation, than they did in the days of the great schooners. The sums spent by people like Lipton and Vanderbilt on each challenge were (IIRC) only about 10 million in today's terms, since the boats were comparatively simple and they didn't churn through sails and trial horses like they do now. The crews are getting paid vastly better today, but then again that just seems to be increasing the overall disparity in society.

Waddie
10-06-2016, 05:09 PM
I appreciate the beauty of all of this... right up to the point where I remember that these are the toys of the Robber Barons.


A lot of great art has come from the patronage of the rich. I can still appreciate it even knowing who paid for it.'

regards,
Waddie

Rum_Pirate
10-06-2016, 05:12 PM
Gotta win a ton of money to pay that ton of canvas.


Is it canvas or Egyptian cotton?


Regardless it still costs a ton.

WoodyHuscarl
10-07-2016, 10:04 AM
Is it canvas or Egyptian cotton?




And what's the thread count? Norm thinks under 300 is roughing it.

Canoeyawl
10-07-2016, 12:42 PM
Check the bow wave on Susan. . .


and the stern wave for that matter

And then think about a jibe....

peb
10-07-2016, 05:18 PM
Currently reading "Temple to the Wind", the book which tells the story of Reliance and the 1903 America's cup.


Does it take that much sail area to get this boat up to maximum displacement speed? I mean, it can't get up on plane or anything, can it?
The America's cup from the 1880s through 1903 (and many other racing venues ) were based Seawanhaka Rule which took into account only sail area and waterline length. The waterline length was limited for the America's cup was limited to 90 ft. So they had extremely long and low overhangs to length the boat while heeling, and then put the absolute biggest rig they could engineer on the boat.
The universal rule which replaced it took into account displacement also, so that the boats would be more reasonably designed. Everyone new these things were monstrosities.



I appreciate the beauty of all of this... right up to the point where I remember that these are the toys of the Robber Barons.
At the time, many people did not think the boats beautiful at all, just the most likely to win races. As to being toys of the Robber Barons, that is true, OTOH following the yacht races was a huge pastime of many common people. Perhaps not that much different than football teams being toys of rich people, but we all enjoy it.

Gerarddm
10-07-2016, 05:45 PM
A lot of great art has come from the patronage of the rich. I can still appreciate it even knowing who paid for it.'


O yes indeed. The Medicis come to mind, as do the Rockefellers in modern times. Not to mention a pope or two.

peb
10-07-2016, 10:00 PM
And then think about a jibe....

I have been wondering while reading the book "Temple to the Wind" if they actually jibed the boats. I suppose it should be obvious that they had to get around the race course, but I have noticed a lack of description of the jibing in the very detailed account of all of the racing. It does talk about the fear of an accidental jibe.

Daniel Noyes
10-07-2016, 10:10 PM
The depressing thing about big boats and robber barons is that the modern day ones seem to be spending vastly more on their boats, adjusted for inflation, than they did in the days of the great schooners. The sums spent by people like Lipton and Vanderbilt on each challenge were (IIRC) only about 10 million in today's terms, since the boats were comparatively simple and they didn't churn through sails and trial horses like they do now. The crews are getting paid vastly better today, but then again that just seems to be increasing the overall disparity in society.

at least the money spent on the boat goes to hard working engineers, machinists, boat builders, painters, sailors etc to pay for their kids school clothes, gas in the car, produce at the local farmers market etc... it's not like the money is piled up and burned.

Paul Pless
10-08-2016, 09:18 AM
http://68.media.tumblr.com/06ac786ce40ccb0c7203183ce65a87ef/tumblr_nujmua8z7F1slwun0o1_1280.jpg

peb
10-08-2016, 10:00 AM
The depressing thing about big boats and robber barons is that the modern day ones seem to be spending vastly more on their boats, adjusted for inflation, than they did in the days of the great schooners. The sums spent by people like Lipton and Vanderbilt on each challenge were (IIRC) only about 10 million in today's terms, since the boats were comparatively simple and they didn't churn through sails and trial horses like they do now. The crews are getting paid vastly better today, but then again that just seems to be increasing the overall disparity in society.



I dont believe the 10 million dollar figure. Each time that Lipton challenged, the New York Yacht Club had to get multiple members to pony up the money. They were quite annoyed the with the challenge in 1903, after just defending in 1901. They were tired of spending the money. I suspect it was much higher

Ted Hoppe
10-08-2016, 10:13 AM
I dont believe the 10 million dollar figure. Each time that Lipton challenged, the New York Yacht Club had to get multiple members to pony up the money. They were quite annoyed the with the challenge in 1903, after just defending in 1901. They were tired of spending the money. I suspect it was much higher

The Panic of 1901 and the crash of the New York Stock exchange had a chilling effect on a few of these guys. They had less to to float and air out with.

It would be an interesting study to look at yachting & design and relate it with the stock market & economics.