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View Full Version : Lumber Yard Skiff flotation requirements



seadog99
09-04-2016, 10:40 AM
Hi All...I am grinding (and sanding!) my way thru my build and have come to the point where I need to build the flotation chambers.
Per the plans, if the skiff will not be used commercially, which mine certainly won't, it must have flotation due to USCG regs.
The plans indicate where the forward chamber is but are unclear on the dimensions of rear chambers.
I have gone thru the info on the website below, and have come up with positive flotation with a 165 lb engine, and no foam. However in the unlikely event she should ever get swamped I want to be sure she floats level.

https://www.uscgboating.org/regulations/assets/builders-handbook/FLOTATION.pdf

I am just wondering how other LYS builders have come up with the proper amount of cubic ft of foam needed?
My buddy laughingly suggested pool noodles cable tied under the side decks!...lol
Am I overthinking this?
I have also emailed Walter Baron but haven't record an answer yet.
Thanks in advance for any responses.

Spokaloo
09-04-2016, 11:52 AM
Do you feel like you need the flotation?

Do you care?

Once those questions are answered, it gets easier. Mine doesn't have a lick of foam in it.

Best practice is to build tanks, pour in a 2 part foam, cut the top square after expansion, glue on the lid and move on. Another common option is to get one of the styrene variants from the local home store and cut them to shape, fill the space, and move on (cheaper than pool noodles). People have used noodles, ping pong balls, milk jugs, blah blah blah. Lots of ways that this cat gets skinned.

E

Bill Wiegmann
09-05-2016, 11:27 AM
You might want to look at the discussion of flotation requirements in this thread: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?120564-CG-Regulations-amp-Backyard-Builders

seadog99
09-05-2016, 11:39 AM
E..thanks for your comments. I am going to go with either a new or fairly new motor ($$$), so in the unlikely event of a swamping I think it would be extremely prudent to have some flotation in the stern per the plans, if for nothing else than general safety. I am planing on a rear castdeck/seat, much like a flats boat, that can be built right on top of the flotation tanks. It should work out ok. I noticed in an older build thread (the red LYS) that the builder had gotten a HIN#. I like that idea, and will probably try to do the same, and having the flotation might be a must. Having the HIN will make an easier sale in case I want to sell it and build another.
Also if there is anybody out there in the general Charleston SC area that has built a LYS, I'd love to hear from you.

Breakaway
09-05-2016, 11:45 AM
Flotation is only required if you are building the boat for sale. That said, I think flotation is a good idea.

Kevin

VictorBravo
09-09-2016, 02:16 PM
I noticed in an older build thread (the red LYS) that the builder had gotten a HIN#. I like that idea, and will probably try to do the same, and having the flotation might be a must. Having the HIN will make an easier sale in case I want to sell it and build another.
Also if there is anybody out there in the general Charleston SC area that has built a LYS, I'd love to hear from you.

I don't know how things work in your state, but in Washington you can get a Hull ID number from the local county auditor. It goes through the State's Department of Licensing. All they want are receipts so they can assess a taxable value and also so that you can prove you built it. They issue a registration number as well. Unless it's small and engineless, pretty much all boats go through this.

It might be different in your state, but I'd check it out before going through Coast Guard and federal system. I've always understood CG HIN's were necessary if you were going to become a manufacturer.