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Reynard38
08-24-2016, 12:22 PM
And from Fox News no less....


http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2016/08/24/epipen-price-gouging-came-as-mylan-pulled-off-tax-inversion.html

Waddie
08-24-2016, 12:27 PM
We don't do Fox news here.

regards,
Waddie

SKIP KILPATRICK
08-24-2016, 12:27 PM
In it's current form..... YES!

David G
08-24-2016, 12:29 PM
Yes... of course it is capitalism. Just one of the many facets which we work with.

Monopoly, duopoly, monopsony, and other variations are, most certainly, aspects of capitalism.

Some of which we regulate to ensure a level (ish) playing field, and minimize the dysfunction that would result.

Garret
08-24-2016, 12:32 PM
Yes - unregulated capitalism at its best. I'm shocked Fox has an issue with it. Trump wouldn't.

BrianY
08-24-2016, 12:33 PM
Yup. No doubt about it.

Reynard38
08-24-2016, 12:42 PM
We don't do Fox news here.

regards,
Waddie

Oh, I'm NO fan of Faux news. I was just surprised they reported on it.

Waddie
08-24-2016, 12:47 PM
Oh, I'm NO fan of Faux news. I was just surprised they reported on it.

I'm not critical of the inversion, that's just taking advantage of tax law. But the huge price spike looks like price gouging, and should be looked into. Just because they are the only product on the market shouldn't allow a company to inflate prices beyond reason. So get them in front of a committee and have them explain the increase, if they can.

regards,
Waddie

Rum_Pirate
08-24-2016, 12:55 PM
In Mylan’s case, it appears the company moved its corporate address to the Netherlands, but still maintains most of its offices in a suburb of Pittsburgh, PA, enjoying the benefits of taxpayer-funded police, fire and other city services.President Obama has lashed out against the practice of inversion, calling it “one of the most insidious tax loopholes out there.” Trump, too, has ripped corporate inversions, calling them a “huge problem.” What makes the Mylan case so problematic is that the company CEO Heather Bresch is the daughter of Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia. Democrats, led by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, have loudly denounced corporate inversions.
“They’ve built the business model on the backs of our kids, moving the headquarters to the Netherlands to avoid paying taxes into the US and as her own father said, something like that should be illegal,” said O’Brien.
Calls by FOX Business to Mylan’s press department were not returned.
Complaints about onerous price hikes in the pharmaceutical industry are age-old and often go unanswered by the companies who hold the patents. As patents expire, generic drug companies often jump in. But oddly, Israeli-based Teva Pharmaceuticals (TEVA (http://www.foxbusiness.com/quote.html?stockTicker=TEVA)) attempted to present a generic version but was soundly swatted down by the FDA which cited “certain major deficiencies” to Teva’s product. O’Brien smells a rat.
“There is no competition. They have a monopoly. The barriers to entry are really high and right now there’s a low cost alternative trying to work its way through the FDA. I’ve been in this for 11 years. We’ve seen Twin-ject come and go, Auvi-Q (by Sanofi US) come and go.. Auvi-Q was recalled because of 26 unconfirmed reports. There needs to be an investigation into how (Mylan) has been able to maintain this monopoly that it has and yes, these are life saving devices but they can come in a lot of different forms and a healthy marketplace means healthy competition,” said O’Brien.



For now, Mylan has remained relatively silent after issuing an initial statement blaming insurance companies, co-pays and deductibles while offering coupons of $100 for the device.
Investors, however, have done anything but remain silent.
Milan shares fell 4.7% during Tuesday’s session and have lost 11% over the past 12-months....

Rum_Pirate
08-24-2016, 12:56 PM
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John of Phoenix
08-24-2016, 01:07 PM
Fox Business is somewhat different than Faux News.

BrianY
08-24-2016, 02:05 PM
I'm not critical of the inversion, that's just taking advantage of tax law. But the huge price spike looks like price gouging, and should be looked into. Just because they are the only product on the market shouldn't allow a company to inflate prices beyond reason. So get them in front of a committee and have them explain the increase, if they can.

regards,
Waddie

The thing is that this sort of price inflation is not illegal. There are no federal laws against price gouging and the state laws that exist deal with essential commodities in times of crisis only. The only thing congress can do about it is to complain loudly. In the end they are powerless to stop it...unless of course they suddenly want to start regulating the pharmaceutical market. Would you be in favor of that?

BrianY
08-24-2016, 02:25 PM
It is not surprising that Martin Shkreli is defending the increase:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/ex-pharma-ceo-martin-shkreli-weighs-in-on-skyrocketing-epipen-prices/



Ex-pharma CEO Martin Shkreli weighs in on skyrocketing EpiPen prices
NEW YORK --

Members of Congress are demanding to know why the price of EpiPens has skyrocketed (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/allergy-medication-epipen-epinephrine-rising-costs-impact-on-families).

The devices deliver a life-saving injection for people with severe allergies, but as CBS News previously reported, the price has gone up by nearly 500 percent since 2009.

“She started going into anaphylactic shock. Her lips turned blue, she started swelling, she wasn’t able to breathe,” said Lexi Henegar of her daughter, Ellie.
Ellie has almost died from food allergies twice. An EpiPen saved her life.

But the price of the injectors on those life-saving EpiPen has soared over seven years, from about $100 for a two-pack, to more than $600 today. All of it for a drug that delivers just $1 or $2 worth of the life-saving hormone epinephrine.

It became a virtual monopoly for the drug-maker Mylan -- after a competitor took a similar product off the market.

Former head of Turing Pharmaceuticals Martin Shkreli (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-charges-for-ex-pharmaceutical-executive-martin-shkreli)​ is currently under indictment for securities fraud. He was heavily criticized for his “5,000 percent” price hike of the malaria and HIV medicine, Daraprim. He defended Mylan to CBS News on Tuesday.

“Mylan is the good guy. They had one product, and they finally started making a little bit of money and everyone is going crazy over it,” said Shkreli. “Like I said, it’s $300 a pack. $300. My iPhone is $700. ... It’s $300 and 90 percent of Americans are insured.”

Mylan said in a statement that they “are committed to working with customers and payers to find solutions to meet the needs of the patients and families we serve.”

Tuesday, Mylan’s stock fell 5 percent.

Hugh Conway
08-24-2016, 02:33 PM
Shrekli comes to the heart of the problem, but to him it's an opportunity. Insured or not, someone's paying that $300.

It’s $300 and 90 percent of Americans are insured.”

Reynard38
08-24-2016, 03:26 PM
Well insured or not somebody is paying for it, and somebody else is getting very, very rich.

Dan McCosh
08-24-2016, 03:30 PM
It's not exactly capitalism--it's just one of a long list of ripoffs stemming from Medicare drug payments without any negotiations for price. Payments by the US of up to 10x Canadian payments are pretty common. There is no free market for legal drugs.

Keith Wilson
08-24-2016, 03:43 PM
Closer to piracy than capitalism, although at times there's some overlap.

Waddie
08-25-2016, 05:39 AM
From the Journal of the American medical Association (JAMA)

"High drug prices are the result of the approach the United States has taken to granting government-protected monopolies to drug manufacturers, combined with coverage requirements imposed on government-funded drug benefits.......

The primary reason for increasing drug spending is the high price of branded products protected by market exclusivity provisions granted by the US Patent and Trademark Office and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Table 2 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015t2)). Although brand-name drugs comprise only 10% of all dispensed prescriptions in the United States, they account for 72% of drug spending.15 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r15) Between 2008 and 2015, prices for the most commonly used brand-name drugs increased 164%, far in excess of the consumer price index (12%).16 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r16),17 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r17)...... .

Although brand-name drugs account for the greatest increase in prescription drug expenditures, another area that has captured the attention of the public and of policy makers has been the sharp increase in the costs of some older generic drugs. In 2015, Turing Pharmaceuticals raised the price of pyrimethamine (Daraprim), a 63-year-old treatment for toxoplasmosis, by 5500%, from $13.50 to $750 a pill.22 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r22) The company was able to set the high price despite the absence of any patent protection because no other competing manufacturer was licensed to market the drug in the United States......

in countries with national health insurance systems, a delegated body negotiates drug prices or rejects coverage of products if the price demanded by the manufacturer is excessive in light of the benefit provided (Table 3 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015t3)); manufacturers may then decide to offer the drug at a lower price.24 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r24) In England and Wales, for example, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence considers whether a new drug passes a cost-utility threshold—usually between 20 000 and 30 000 ($25 000-$40 000) per quality-adjusted life-year added—before recommending it for coverage by the National Health Service.25 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r25) Although prices can vary widely around the world26 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r26) and have also increased faster than member states’ gross domestic products in recent years in Europe,27 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r27) US drug prices per capita still substantially outpace those in other settings.10 (http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691#jsc160015r10)......"

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2545691

The entire article is worth a read.

regards,
Waddie

Ian McColgin
08-25-2016, 05:52 AM
I'm insured. Without immediate treatment I will die within 30 seconds if stung by a yellow jacket. My insurance does not cover the EpiPen.

Side beef - I used to have a nice unit called AnaKit - a two shot subcutaneous needle, a string lymph tourniquet, and some strong anti-histamines. A much better combination and, unlike the EpiPen that still runs a good 20+% failure rate, is more compact, easier to carry, and gives the tools for full treatment. Allegedly the AnaKit was a stray needle hazard. Actually it was the EpiPen company's predatory marketing so they could position themselves for effective monopoly.

And there's no reason why any of these products, including the few EpiPen competitors listed in other posts, should cost even $50.

John Smith
08-25-2016, 06:02 AM
The thing is that this sort of price inflation is not illegal. There are no federal laws against price gouging and the state laws that exist deal with essential commodities in times of crisis only. The only thing congress can do about it is to complain loudly. In the end they are powerless to stop it...unless of course they suddenly want to start regulating the pharmaceutical market. Would you be in favor of that?

A lot of people who don't like socialism are probably going to start screaming, "There ought to be a law". Most laws/regulations come about when a need for them is seen. We are seeing a need.

I think it's kind of dumb to price this product out of reach of many who need it. Why? If people can't afford it, they can't buy it. Without it some will die. Seems to me selling it for less will keep their customer base alive.

Ian McColgin
08-25-2016, 06:13 AM
What the "free market" fundamentalists try to ignore is that business is a game. Games work best if there are clear rules that make for fair play. Games without enforceable rules do not work.

BrianY
08-25-2016, 09:17 AM
I think it's kind of dumb to price this product out of reach of many who need it. Why? If people can't afford it, they can't buy it. Without it some will die. Seems to me selling it for less will keep their customer base alive.

The drug manufacturers attitude about such things seems to me to be summed up perfectly by Shkreli when he said in reference to the epipen increase "It’s $300 and 90 percent of Americans are insured.” Which, if you take a moment to think about it, is totally insane because it's perfectly obvious that the insurer's costs are passed on to the insured via insurance premiums, never mind the fact that not all drugs are covered by insurance. But that doesn't seem to matter to the drug companies. As long as they get paid by someone, they don't care. If a few patients can't afford the drug, the increased income from the higher price paid by those that can will more than cover the loss.

Waddie
08-25-2016, 04:29 PM
The CEO of the company under fire, and the one responsible for the price spike, is the daughter of a US Senator. Democratic senator. She's also the one who moved the company headquarters to the Netherlands to avoid US taxes.Well connected, ain't she.... papa must be sooo proud...

https://theintercept.com/2016/08/24/epipen-uproar-highlights-companys-family-ties-to-congress/

And there's more to it. This gal really knows how to work the system.

regards,
Waddie

Daniel Noyes
08-25-2016, 04:34 PM
Fox Business is somewhat different than Faux News.

another Liberal Multinational Corporation taking criminal advantage of working class Americans... and Democrats stand up and Cheer for Multinationalism... sickening

biga
08-25-2016, 04:44 PM
it's hard to say where you get to draw a line on this. on one hand you should be letting the free market set prices but on the other hand you don't want people dying b/c they can't afford life saving medical treatment. let's say i invent the cure for cancer and it costs me $1 to make your treatment. why should i not be allowed to charge $100,000 per treatment? if i invented something i should be able to charge whatever people are willing to pay for my product right? that's a fundamental of free market capitalism, but it's awful at the same time. some other greedy turd did the same thing last year or so with some other drug. sure, he gets lambasted in the press for it, but there's not a lot you can do right? or would you put all of this under price gouging? and how can YOU tell ME what the cost of my product is or what is an "acceptable" profit margin for my time and service?

johnw
08-25-2016, 04:58 PM
Epinephrine was isolated in 1901. There's really no reason to have only one supplier. I suspect regulatory capture. There's a reason Mylan chose a U.S. senator's daughter as their CEO.

http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2016-08-24/the-senator-s-daughter-who-raised-prices-on-anti-allergy-epipen

johnw
08-25-2016, 04:59 PM
it's hard to say where you get to draw a line on this. on one hand you should be letting the free market set prices but on the other hand you don't want people dying b/c they can't afford life saving medical treatment. let's say i invent the cure for cancer and it costs me $1 to make your treatment. why should i not be allowed to charge $100,000 per treatment? if i invented something i should be able to charge whatever people are willing to pay for my product right? that's a fundamental of free market capitalism, but it's awful at the same time. some other greedy turd did the same thing last year or so with some other drug. sure, he gets lambasted in the press for it, but there's not a lot you can do right? or would you put all of this under price gouging? and how can YOU tell ME what the cost of my product is or what is an "acceptable" profit margin for my time and service?

If it were a free market, you'd be right. With competition excluded from the market, it isn't.

Too Little Time
08-25-2016, 06:43 PM
Epinephrine was isolated in 1901. There's really no reason to have only one supplier. I suspect regulatory capture. There's a reason Mylan chose a U.S. senator's daughter as their CEO.
There are a number of alternatives. But some people what convenience. And you need a specific prescription for the alternatives - they are not generic substitutions.


There are other alternatives to using an EpiPen. “When patients have these issues, I offer them a few options,” Bajowala said. One of those options is Adrenaclick, an auto-injector pen that delivers epinephrine, and has generic alternatives. “The only downside is that it does leave an exposed needle when you are finished with the injection, so you have to be a little more careful when pulling out,” Bajowala said. “But the cost difference for some patients can be substantial, saving them hundreds of dollars on the prescription.”

The other option is to use a syringe and draw the epinephrine out of the vial, said Caudle. “One of the things about using a syringe is that there are many more steps,” Caudle explained. “There are two pieces of equipment. You need to use alcohol to wipe off the vial first. There’s a lot more room for error.”


My granddaughter carries an Epipen with her.

johnw
08-25-2016, 08:09 PM
There are a number of alternatives. But some people what convenience. And you need a specific prescription for the alternatives - they are not generic substitutions.



My granddaughter carries an Epipen with her.

http://www.newser.com/story/230113/theres-a-cheaper-epipen-but-theres-a-catch.html



But there's a problem: Most people—including teachers and nurses—know how to work EpiPens, and the technology on the Adrenaclick is different, which could lead to people using them incorrectly or moving too slowly during an emergency situation, potentially leading to injuries. In fact, an American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology study found that people prescribed epinephrine who don't use it for at least three months risk losing their injection skills and need retraining. Another cheaper option: homemade delivery systems made from syringes that people fill with epinephrine themselves. But that could prove even more risky than the generic device, experts say, per Consumer Reports: While the Adrenaclick at least houses the same dosages of the drug, people filling their own syringes could put in too little or too much, adding another complication on top of the training issue.

biga
08-26-2016, 08:22 AM
question, are all epipens the same dosage? or are there actual prescriptions for kids and adult sized people?

Ian McColgin
08-26-2016, 08:30 AM
Two sizes. The EpiPen is suited for people over 66 pounds. The EpiPenJr has half the dose and is meant for children 33-66 pounds.

Too Little Time
08-26-2016, 09:01 AM
http://www.newser.com/story/230113/theres-a-cheaper-epipen-but-theres-a-catch.html
Your claim is that people are stupid. Because of that they deserve (through a long line of reasoning) cheap drugs. I don't find that persuasive.

It is very simple for the government to allow the importation of drugs. All drugs not just this drug.


See how I solved the problem in 2 sentences.

Rum_Pirate
08-26-2016, 09:08 AM
Your claim is that people are stupid. Because of that they deserve (through a long line of reasoning) cheap drugs. I don't find that persuasive.

It is very simple for the government to allow the importation of drugs. All drugs not just this drug.


See how I solved the problem in 2 sentences.


Too little time for president!

Dan McCosh
08-26-2016, 09:40 AM
it's hard to say where you get to draw a line on this. on one hand you should be letting the free market set prices but on the other hand you don't want people dying b/c they can't afford life saving medical treatment. let's say i invent the cure for cancer and it costs me $1 to make your treatment. why should i not be allowed to charge $100,000 per treatment? if i invented something i should be able to charge whatever people are willing to pay for my product right? that's a fundamental of free market capitalism, but it's awful at the same time. some other greedy turd did the same thing last year or so with some other drug. sure, he gets lambasted in the press for it, but there's not a lot you can do right? or would you put all of this under price gouging? and how can YOU tell ME what the cost of my product is or what is an "acceptable" profit margin for my time and service? The issue with drugs is that virtually no individual actually buys them The price is set by what a communal system pays. Globally this is mainly some form of national health care, which negotiates the price with the consumer. If drug companies were limited by the customer's ability to pay, drugs would be much cheaper.

Reynard38
08-26-2016, 10:58 AM
it's hard to say where you get to draw a line on this. on one hand you should be letting the free market set prices but on the other hand you don't want people dying b/c they can't afford life saving medical treatment. let's say i invent the cure for cancer and it costs me $1 to make your treatment. why should i not be allowed to charge $100,000 per treatment? if i invented something i should be able to charge whatever people are willing to pay for my product right? that's a fundamental of free market capitalism, but it's awful at the same time. some other greedy turd did the same thing last year or so with some other drug. sure, he gets lambasted in the press for it, but there's not a lot you can do right? or would you put all of this under price gouging? and how can YOU tell ME what the cost of my product is or what is an "acceptable" profit margin for my time and service?

Ok, I'll bite. Let's say somebody did invent a cure for cancer. A simple, cheap to produce fast 100% cure. A pill maybe.
You'd get 2 in the back of the head before you EVER brought it to market.
Think of all the $$ the hospitals, doctors, insurance companies and of course big pharma would lose. It and you would never see another sunrise.
If however you did manage to pull it off, and you charged $100,000 per treatment for something that cost you $1 to make and could save millions of lives you'd deserve 2 in the back of the head.

Not a lot of incentive either way is there?

biga
08-26-2016, 11:04 AM
Ok, I'll bite. Let's say somebody did invent a cure for cancer. A simple, cheap to produce fast 100% cure. A pill maybe.
You'd get 2 in the back of the head before you EVER brought it to market.
Think of all the $$ the hospitals, doctors, insurance companies and of course big pharma would lose. It and you would never see another sunrise.
If however you did manage to pull it off, and you charged $100,000 per treatment for something that cost you $1 to make and could save millions of lives you'd deserve 2 in the back of the head.

Not a lot of incentive either way is there?



hahahhaha, i like it

Reynard38
08-26-2016, 11:10 AM
The issue with drugs is that virtually no individual actually buys them The price is set by what a communal system pays. Globally this is mainly some form of national health care, which negotiates the price with the consumer. If drug companies were limited by the customer's ability to pay, drugs would be much cheaper.

Agree 100%.

Garret
08-27-2016, 06:49 AM
As a kinda side note to this, I am currently on antibiotics. With my insurance, they cost about $32 for 28 pills (14 days worth). If I had no insurance, the cost would be $145 for the 28 pills.

Now I realize this is because BC/BS has negotiated prices but the unfairness of this just astounds me. What is even vaguely ethical about charging quadruple for a person who most likely can least afford it?

Rum_Pirate
08-27-2016, 07:22 AM
As a kinda side note to this, I am currently on antibiotics. With my insurance, they cost about $32 for 28 pills (14 days worth). If I had no insurance, the cost would be $145 for the 28 pills.

Now I realize this is because BC/BS has negotiated prices but the unfairness of this just astounds me. What is even vaguely ethical about charging quadruple for a person who most likely can least afford it?


Basically people without insurance, mainly the poor, are screwed by the drug companies. This not just in the USA.

Too Little Time
08-27-2016, 08:24 AM
As a kinda side note to this, I am currently on antibiotics. With my insurance, they cost about $32 for 28 pills (14 days worth). If I had no insurance, the cost would be $145 for the 28 pills.

Now I realize this is because BC/BS has negotiated prices but the unfairness of this just astounds me. What is even vaguely ethical about charging quadruple for a person who most likely can least afford it?
I believe if you ask the pharmacy , it will give you something close to the lower price.

But you seem to be doing the wrong math. You need to add at least part of the cost of the insurance to the cost of the pills.

Reynard38
08-27-2016, 11:36 AM
As a kinda side note to this, I am currently on antibiotics. With my insurance, they cost about $32 for 28 pills (14 days worth). If I had no insurance, the cost would be $145 for the 28 pills.

Now I realize this is because BC/BS has negotiated prices but the unfairness of this just astounds me. What is even vaguely ethical about charging quadruple for a person who most likely can least afford it?

You might want to shop around. Our dearly departed pug, Trudy, was diabetic. Shots morning and night. When we first started buying the insulin from the Publix pharmacy it was $25. In the course of 4 years it went to $128.
With the last price hike I asked to speak to the head pharmacist. I inquired why the price hike? She asked why I didn't just use my insurance to pay for it. I told her it was for our dog, so paying cash.
She called her friend, a pharmacist at Walmart. She told me they had the exact same vial of insulin for $24.88.
So of course I drove the 5 miles to get it!
At Walmart I asked why such a price difference. She responded that Publix customers had insurance, but Walmart shoppers did not.
I submit that insurance is part of the problem.

Garret
08-27-2016, 02:52 PM
I believe if you ask the pharmacy , it will give you something close to the lower price.

But you seem to be doing the wrong math. You need to add at least part of the cost of the insurance to the cost of the pills.

You completely missed my point. It's not about my personal total cost at all. My insurance does not contribute to the cost, it provides me with a discounted price that they negotiated with the pharmaceutical company. If the company can afford to sell it to people who happen to have insurance @ 32, charging 145 is simply taking advantage.

Too Little Time
08-27-2016, 04:57 PM
You completely missed my point. It's not about my personal total cost at all. My insurance does not contribute to the cost, it provides me with a discounted price that they negotiated with the pharmaceutical company. If the company can afford to sell it to people who happen to have insurance @ 32, charging 145 is simply taking advantage.
And you missed my point. Anyone can ask for the insurance rate or a cash rate. They may get it. My wife always asks. Sometimes the out of pocket using our insurance is greater than what the pharmacy is willing to charge us.

Have you ever bought a car or a house? It seems that the price that people pay depends on if they want to negotiate or not. Perhaps those sellers are taking advantage.

Hugh Conway
08-27-2016, 05:22 PM
He didn't miss it. It's bogus. A pharmacy regularly giving the insurance discount to the uninsured? What's the punchline?

It's up there with the one about using a needle and syringe to administer epinephrine (as if that's a meaningful life substitute these days - Epipens are a pain to deal with with non-family caregivers often).

These are tedious lies.

David G
08-27-2016, 05:28 PM
https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/14067614_10153926160461275_6076169146995563077_n.j pg?oh=814d2cb7f71cf14a96df23fb2d4bb432&oe=5840CB8D

David G
08-27-2016, 05:33 PM
You completely missed my point. It's not about my personal total cost at all. My insurance does not contribute to the cost, it provides me with a discounted price that they negotiated with the pharmaceutical company. If the company can afford to sell it to people who happen to have insurance @ 32, charging 145 is simply taking advantage.

There are certain folks... every time they post (or nearly so), I think of this (stole this from botebum, btw) --

https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-0/s526x395/12494879_10206719541765430_6079910837800879207_n.j pg?oh=24a49633f87df4534682e364a8cbb877&oe=58590F49

Too Little Time
08-27-2016, 06:48 PM
He didn't miss it. It's bogus. A pharmacy regularly giving the insurance discount to the uninsured? What's the punchline?

It's up there with the one about using a needle and syringe to administer epinephrine (as if that's a meaningful life substitute these days - Epipens are a pain to deal with with non-family caregivers often).

These are tedious lies.
http://www.consumerreports.org/drugs/6-tips-for-finding-the-best-prescription-drug-prices/

Shoppers sometimes found that they could get a discount, but only after they asked.

I am sure you are correct.

Garret
08-27-2016, 08:01 PM
There are certain folks... every time they post (or nearly so), I think of this (stole this from botebum, btw) --



I miss botebum. Hope he's doing well. His daughter must be a teenager by now.

Rum_Pirate
08-28-2016, 06:19 AM
https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/14067614_10153926160461275_6076169146995563077_n.j pg?oh=814d2cb7f71cf14a96df23fb2d4bb432&oe=5840CB8D


https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/54/cc/e1/54cce1077d51bcd8389d2a027dd3c3a0.jpg

Waddie
08-28-2016, 08:23 AM
I don't have a citation, but I remember reading that the government paid for the research that developed main ingredient in the Epipen. They wanted a product that would counter the effects of poison gas.

regards,
Waddie

David G
08-28-2016, 09:43 AM
I miss botebum. Hope he's doing well. His daughter must be a teenager by now.

He's well and good, and his daughter continues to be a little cutie.

David G
08-28-2016, 09:44 AM
I don't have a citation, but I remember reading that the government paid for the research that developed main ingredient in the Epipen. They wanted a product that would counter the effects of poison gas.

regards,
Waddie

That was my understanding as well.