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TomF
08-17-2016, 10:55 AM
Some of you might know that our PM has shown up in a few family photos recently with his shirt off. Other people's family photos ... like the couple who got married on the beach in Tofino, where the PM was surfing on holiday. Etc.

Sometimes, our comedians do things worth a standing ovation (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/shirtless-critch-catches-seamus-oregan-off-guard-1.3723842).
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Cp6FzNYXEAAH_3O.jpg

Paul Pless
08-17-2016, 10:59 AM
It would be nice if this turkey devoted some time to his job. And I thought his father was useless!

love you man
you're like canada's paul girouard :D

TomF
08-17-2016, 11:00 AM
To be fair to Trudeau, the photobomb was Critch's own notion on the spur of the moment. The PM wasn't in the know.

genglandoh
08-17-2016, 11:03 AM
Nice photo of signal hill St. John's Newfoundland.

TomF
08-17-2016, 11:05 AM
If you can make it out over the glinting of Critch's awesome and pasty chest. :D

genglandoh
08-17-2016, 11:12 AM
If you can make it out over the glinting of Critch's awesome and pasty chest. :D

Newfoundland is not known for it's sunshine.
When I was a kid you could buy a can of Newfoundland Fog.

mmd
08-17-2016, 11:24 AM
When the weather in St. John's is nice, it is spectacular; when it's not nice, well, it is awful. Cape Race, about 110 kms (about 60 miles) south of where this photo was taken, has the dubious honour of being the foggiest place in the world, averaging over 300 days per year of bad visibility. St. John's isn't that far behind.

As for the bare-chested Mr. Critch photo-bombing the Prime Minister, I heard that when he became aware of the act, Trudeau turned to Mark and shared a few words and laughter over it. I don't think that our former Prime Minister would have been as accomodating.

TomF
08-17-2016, 11:27 AM
I love Critch. Remember this clip?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVE6bQJIb_A

Canoez
08-17-2016, 11:30 AM
The facepalm seals the deal:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Cp6K668XEAEZ1FW.jpg:large

CWSmith
08-17-2016, 01:30 PM
It would be nice if this turkey devoted some time to his job. And I thought his father was useless!

If one asks "What did Ford do?", the first answer is that he put the Nixon experience behind us and people felt better about their country. From what I saw of Harper, Trudeau is doing fine.

TomF
08-17-2016, 01:42 PM
Trudeau the son isn't Trudeau the father. Nothing like as bright, focused, or I think capable of cruelty in pursuit of what he thought moral.

I think, though, that he's a far kinder and warmer person. His cabinet processes are much more consultative, and are enabling a variety of ministers (and their departments) to make positive changes. Once they get past a year in office, though, we'll need to see how effectively they've managed to turn around the management disaster that is the Phoenix payroll system, the shipbuilding contracts fiascos, to say nothing of the matter of fighter jets. Those of us who are not party to the contractual details don't know how much or how little wiggle room there may be in any of those multi-year projects ... largely negotiated by the predecessor administration. But once you've been in for a year, the previous guys' management style is a year out of date ... and if you've not been able to impose your own, that's a problem itself.

My friends now doing the federal/provincial file are far happier with the more collegial relationship, though they too are under no illusions about early promises always leading to later deliveries. We will see.

TomF
08-17-2016, 03:54 PM
I doubt that Trudeau can affect the global price of oil over much, and it remains to be seen whether he or any politician can have a pipeline built from anywhere to anywhere in order to get Alberta's bitumen to offshore markets. The world has changed since such megaprojects were last attempted. Those are the two things which will have, in the short term, the most immediate effect on Canada's economy.

I don't much think that tax policy can drive private sector investment anymore; mass consumer product manufacturing will mostly be done offshore for the foreseeable future, unless Canada reverts to some form of protectionism. We will likely see a resurgence in manufacturing either of niche products, or (as Ontario's tended in recent decades) to manufacturing .. machinery for manufacturing. But it's unlikely that we'll build proportionately more refrigerators than America or the UK does.

What I think, though, is that the Canadian economy can diversify more in terms of services and intellectual/cultural property creation - and that the comparative advantages still hold. Using talent in existing firms and in the university system to develop new knowledge-driven products and services. And I think that there are growing opportunities to supply more of our domestic market for some consumable products (food, for one), through competing on location, quality, and features only available through local production.

The First Nations issues are larger by far, thorny as hell, and no Federal government has a positive record of addressing them. In part, though, it reflects a structurally incorrect approach. It is not rational nor reasonable, I've come to think, that any folk can choose to live in remote locations and expect lifestyles similar to living in non-remote locations. A former colleague is now working on contract in Iqaluit, and it's bloody far away. It costs a fortune to eat up there what I eat down here, the materials to build a modern house up there cost a fortune more than they cost down here. And it is entirely unreasonable to blame any Government for the fact that everything has to be airlifted in, which costs money. That the airlifting is on an infinitesimal scale, which also increases the price of transportation, etc.

When I moved to Fredericton from Edmonton, I accepted that in a town 20X smaller than Edmonton, the library would probably suck. So would the public transit system, and various other things. I can't buy wine in the same variety and at the same price point either. If I come up with a lovely niche product, there are blessed few people here that I could potentially sell it to, and would have to do a massive amount more work to develop markets than if I lived in a larger place with a larger market. It's a cost of living here, which I choose to shoulder because I prefer other qualities which can't be had there.

The same, frankly, is true for living in remote communities - whether those are First Nations' reserves, or other places. And if people choose, for any number of sound and wondrous and positive reasons to live in such places, it may be that they need to cope in ways not so dissimilar in some respects to how their grandparents and great-grandparents made out. It's a cost of the choice.

Paul Pless
08-17-2016, 04:14 PM
that was brilliant


I love Critch. Remember this clip?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVE6bQJIb_A

mmd
08-18-2016, 12:48 PM
Our version of "Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee" with Seinfeld and Obama, perhaps?