PDA

View Full Version : Have You Switched Political Parties In The Past 50 Years?



oznabrag
08-06-2016, 09:35 AM
My observation is that the Republican Party has quietly been losing members for quite some time, due to the increasing radicalization of their ideological position, and their unabashed pandering to the Insano-American factions.

Paul Pless
08-06-2016, 09:42 AM
I used to be a republican, now I'm a pinko commie tree hugger.

Gerarddm
08-06-2016, 09:44 AM
Insano-Americans, that is good. Must put that in my quiver.

Norman Bernstein
08-06-2016, 09:53 AM
I have never been a member of any political party. I vote for the man or woman, not the party.

ron ll
08-06-2016, 10:01 AM
I started with Adlai Stevenson and never looked back. (Okay, I was too young to vote but I wore his pin to grade school.)

CWSmith
08-06-2016, 10:23 AM
People are said to grow more conservative as they age.

Somehow, I've gone in the other direction from moderate to bat-cr@p crazy, angry liberal.

Canoeyawl
08-06-2016, 10:27 AM
My father certainly has.
Bush the boy, during the rhetoric phase for the invasion of Iraq convinced him that something was terribly wrong. He simply referred to it as "Fascism".

(In an attempt to change local public opinion during the "Dept. Of Homeland Security" debacle, Dad would go down to some of the popular tourist spots like the harbors at Camden or Rockport and with perfect deadpan, advise anyone using binoculars that they were subject to the new laws and that they were acting suspiciously and would be watched. Of course they looked frightened and obeyed... quickly hiding the binoculars)

My sister accused him of being cruel!

Ian McColgin
08-06-2016, 10:41 AM
Not sure I'd say "steadfast". In high school I was briefly a Goldwater conservative but Goldwater's positions were more and more obviously at variance with what I'd always thought of as a conservative's social obligation to succor the poor. And I was still a year away from voting age (then 21) when I joined the action at the Chicago Democratic National Convention. Despite that experience, the next year I registered Democrat to vote in local elections and through five states I've not been registered any other way. But there have been times when in local elections a Republican was better than his or her opponents and a few more times in local elections when a liberal alternative was better. At the presidential level, I've only voted Democratic.

I view myself as one of those progressives who is allied with, not subsumed by, the Democratic Party.

My parents, Republicans to death, last voted for a Republican for president in 1960 and never again.

Lew Barrett
08-06-2016, 10:45 AM
I have always been liberal minded but I have not always been registered to a party. I registered as a Democrat about 15 years ago when I started getting interested in attending caucuses in Washington where that's the only meaningful way you get to engage in the prelims. Since then, I've maintained that status because I consider it to be the increasingly patriotic thing to do. It doesn't stop me from voting my conscience in any election but these days it's impossible to find a Republican to vote for. More's the pity.
I have found myself at loggerheads with both parties of late but until we again have a system that is not bought sold and paid for, I'll maintain my registered status as a Democrat who is delighted that Debbie Wasserman Schultz has "resigned." After the general election, it will be time to roll up the sleeves and work towards reforming the process, hopefully with a saner SCOTUS to assist in the process going forward.

David G
08-06-2016, 10:45 AM
I've always been registered as a Democrat. Early on... you'd not have known it from my voting patterns. Too many good Republicans running. I wish that were still true... but it hasn't been for decades.

CWSmith
08-06-2016, 10:49 AM
(In an attempt to change local public opinion during the "Dept. Of Homeland Security" debacle, Dad would go down to some of the popular tourist spots like the harbors at Camden or Rockport and with perfect deadpan, advise anyone using binoculars that they were subject to the new laws and that they were acting suspiciously and would be watched. Of course they looked frightened and obeyed... quickly hiding the binoculars)

My sister accused him of being cruel!

I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

John of Phoenix
08-06-2016, 10:53 AM
I used to be a republican, now I'm a pinko commie tree hugger.A party of two.

Chip-skiff
08-06-2016, 03:02 PM
My dad was a right-wing nut, John Bircher, etc. As an innocent child, I canvassed for Goldwater. But Nixon put me off the GOP forever.

skuthorp
08-06-2016, 06:41 PM
Doesn't apply in US terms maybe, but a party I supported has deserted me.

LeeG
08-06-2016, 07:50 PM
Switched from Democrt to independent in '91, thinking of switching back,

Keith Wilson
08-06-2016, 08:06 PM
I've generally voted for Democrats, but I used to vote for moderate Republicans sometimes, depending on the person. I particularly liked Arne Carlson, 2-term governor of Minnesota, and a Republican. Moderate Republicans are almost extinct, alas, and the way things are going I'll never vote R again in my lifetime.

johnw
08-06-2016, 08:27 PM
I have never been a member of any political party. I vote for the man or woman, not the party.

I used to vote a split ticket every time, but it's getting harder and harder for an independent to find a sane Republican to vote for. I still find them occasionally, but at this point, my moderate political views are becoming more and more associated with the Democrats. It would be a lot easier to vote for Republicans if a.) they hadn't spent years kicking moderates out of the party and b.) they would make the sort of compromises a party needs to make if it's serious about governing.

BrianY
08-06-2016, 08:41 PM
I have always been a registered Democrat but I have no loyalty to the party. It's just that generally speaking, Democrat candiates are closer to my positions/beliefs than Republican. If that should change, my party affiliation will change too.

elf
08-06-2016, 08:42 PM
There must a few good Republicans left somewhere, but I haven't seen one is a very long time.

Come to think of it, there aren't all that many good Democrats left either.

Vince Brennan
08-06-2016, 10:05 PM
I gave up on them when Everett died.

leikec
08-06-2016, 10:40 PM
I'd considered myself a moderate centrist for a number of years, and my one election working for a congressional candidate was for a GOP candidate, but I'm becoming more liberal in my old age.

Today's Republican Party is completely off the rails.

Jeff C

Nicholas Carey
08-07-2016, 01:58 AM
People are said to grow more conservative as they age.

Somehow, I've gone in the other direction from moderate to bat-cr@p crazy, angry liberal.


I realized that a few years ago. I'm getting more radicalized as I get older.

skuthorp
08-07-2016, 04:38 AM
I think we just loose patience with the system and the persons involved as we get older.
"I've been voting for …… years and the pirates are still in charge of the treasury":arg

(Interesting poll so far………..)

AndyG
08-07-2016, 06:13 AM
People are said to grow more conservative as they age.

The votes-by-age in the recent Scottish independence referendum suggested it: you were more likely to vote "No" than "Yes" the older you were - but maybe this is a generational thing, not an ageing thing.

For myself, I'm sliding more and more Socialist the older I get. Probably because I've lived through too many examples of injustice and unfairness foisted on us by the UK Right.

Andy

Wooden Boat Fittings
08-07-2016, 06:28 AM
I'm surprised (and heart-warmingly pleased) at the candour of comments so far in this thread.

I've voted 'Other', but only because I'm not in the US. I've never been a member of any political party. I probably voted 'conservative' until I was in my 30s, but (like others here) I've become more liberal-minded as I've got older. I certainly haven't voted for our right-wing Liberal Party for a long while, but I'm becoming more constantly disenchanted with their major opposition, the Labor Party.

So I feel really that I've been disenfranchised. And that the ground is ripe for the establishment of another Australian-Democrats-inspired party -- to "keep the bastards honest."

Mike

Curtism
08-07-2016, 06:30 AM
I switched from being a life long registered Independent to Democrat in 2007 in order to vote against Clinton in the primaries. Having left it that way enabled me to vote against her again in this years primary.

Peerie Maa
08-07-2016, 06:35 AM
The votes-by-age in the recent Scottish independence referendum suggested it: you were more likely to vote "No" than "Yes" the older you were - but maybe this is a generational thing, not an ageing thing.


Andy

I think it is neither, unless you recognise that experience comes with age. My politics have firmed up the more I have seen and experienced. Then again I am not Scottish.

PeterSibley
08-07-2016, 06:37 AM
Much like Mike, my parents voted Liberal( conservative) in my youth but moved to Labor with the Vietnam Wat and so did I.

But I've become increasingly disenchanted with Labor over the last decade or two and now vote Green, the only sensible choice in an AGW world.

Ian McColgin
08-07-2016, 06:51 AM
The generation thing matters. People my age who have been in civil rights and other struggles for fifty years or more know that while some things a worse, like income distribution, most are significantly better. And even the income distribution is certainly not without precedent, as my grandmother's struggles against the malefactors of great wealth in the Gilded Age show. Things are better. Just not by a long shot good enough.

Another thing that the mixed discontent and serenity of age brings is the realization that nothing is won forever and nothing is lost forever. My grandmother also faced the bitter realization that women's suffrage and prohibition did not end war, poverty and oppression. Seems a quaint fantasy now. And blood on the streets of Chicago did not end the Vietnam War.

There are many nations where the fascists have won, at least for a while, and look where it gets them. Fascism is cheap comfort. There are also many places where democratic self-governance has run out of idealism and then falls down. Progressives don't need to win every good thing when they first bring it up - look how long it took to get the eight hour day or minimum wage - but we do need to be a constant presence or the dark side wins all.

Peerie Maa
08-07-2016, 07:23 AM
Well, you are talking about populations, not individuals.

One dynamic that affects populations is the success of different political parties when in power.
If the economy is running along well, socialist policies improve everyone's happiness levels, and the campaigning fires burn low.
This allows the right wing to take power. If they have too strong a mandate, they can really spoil the lives of the disadvantaged. However if the economy continues to run OK, so the majority are still content, so they will not change the party in power, (setting aside the grass is greener factor).
The classic "I'm all right jack attitude".
Now it may be that the younger generation, having lived through less, are more inclined to try for the "Grass is greener" option, not knowing what they risk losing.

Bob Adams
08-07-2016, 08:01 AM
I vote for the man or woman, not the party.

How do you get coffee off a computer monitor screen?:rolleyes:

Bob Adams
08-07-2016, 08:03 AM
I remain a Democrat although I can't remember ever voting a straight Democrat ticket.

brad9798
08-07-2016, 08:17 AM
I vote with whom I agree ... they tend to be mostly Republican ... but quite a few Dems. I am rather independent.

johnw
08-07-2016, 02:56 PM
I vote with whom I agree ... they tend to be mostly Republican ... but quite a few Dems. I am rather independent.

Nice to see you back, Brad.

CWSmith
08-07-2016, 02:58 PM
There must a few good Republicans left somewhere, but I haven't seen one is a very long time.

My uncle, but he has no place in today's GOP.

CWSmith
08-07-2016, 03:01 PM
I realized that a few years ago. I'm getting more radicalized as I get older.

I think what has happened is that what it takes to keep the world safe for the next generation has changed from personal savings and a strong military to a functional society that solves complex problems. To the extent that the GOP represents the conservative mind, they are not doing that.

Chris Smith porter maine
08-07-2016, 03:13 PM
In 1978 at 18 I started out a Democrat, after Carter and the handling of Iran and the hostages I switched to Republican, back then there were lots of sane ones from my State, Dave Emory, Bill Cohen, Olympia Snow, Margaret Chase Smith, Susan Collins, today there few and far between with the choice of Trump I feel my moderate Republican values have been trashed, actually the only moderate from this years clown car was far from moderate.

CWSmith
08-07-2016, 03:21 PM
... after Carter and the handling of Iran and the hostages ...

How would you have handled it differently?

Ian McColgin
08-07-2016, 03:42 PM
I'd have not allowed Reagan to illegally negotiate with the terrorists.

Michael D. Storey
08-07-2016, 03:57 PM
In 1978 at 18 I started out a Democrat, after Carter and the handling of Iran and the hostages I switched to Republican, back then there were lots of sane ones from my State, Dave Emory, Bill Cohen, Olympia Snow, Margaret Chase Smith, Susan Collins, today there few and far between with the choice of Trump I feel my moderate Republican values have been trashed, actually the only moderate from this years clown car was far from moderate.Olympia's nephew Ralph ran a maritime museum in Maine back in the 70's. I don't know if either he or it survive.

john welsford
08-07-2016, 04:22 PM
With our system, you get two votes. One for which party you prefer and one for your local representative. Quite often people, me included, will vote for a candidate who belongs to a party different to the party one supports.
Me? I vote for the party and the candidate who seems best at the time, so may vote differently each time.
I would say, politely and with respect to my many American friends, that I'm very glad that our politics are much less divisive, and much less focussed on personalities than whats happening in the USA today. Thats sad stuff and a distraction from the real issues.

John Welsford


I have never been a member of any political party. I vote for the man or woman, not the party.

john welsford
08-07-2016, 04:29 PM
I think it is neither, unless you recognise that experience comes with age. My politics have firmed up the more I have seen and experienced. Then again I am not Scottish.


I read a saying somewhere a while back, about University students that went along the lines of "If you dont support labour ( read democrats in the USA) when you are at University you are very unusual, but then, if you dont support conservative ( read GOP) when you are 50, then you are equally unusual. For those who go into the business world that is pretty much true.
Ones life experiences tend to change ones point of view as they accumulate.

John Welsford

Shang
08-07-2016, 04:41 PM
In 1950 I considered writing-in a vote for Gus Hall, leader of the American Communist Party, who was running with black activist Angela Davis, but I was living in a town so small that the voting booth was set up on the front porch of the general store. The write-in would have been a give away since few other people in town could write, so I voted for Jimmy Carter, against Ronald Reagan, thus avoiding my lynching.

CWSmith
08-07-2016, 04:46 PM
I'd have not allowed Reagan to illegally negotiate with the terrorists.

That's true, or prosecute him after.

Add to that getting the Hughes Corp for helping the Chinese build better ICBMs.

Not every traitor is a nobody at the nexus of information flow.

Tom Montgomery
08-07-2016, 07:16 PM
Where are all the steadfast Bilge Republicans?

Evidently they do not wish to be humiliated.

Chris Coose
08-07-2016, 10:07 PM
I was born steadfast liberal. I always thought it has been a genetic condition, though, like my varicose veins the gene must have skipped a generation or two because I see no evidence in my heritage.

Canoeyawl
08-08-2016, 12:28 AM
Heh-heh...
In our barn there is still today a license plate on the wall promoting Alf Landon!!!

http://thumbs.worthpoint.com/zoom/images1/1/0214/18/maine-1936-landon-barrows-white_1_cbe38bd987613d3782e20398c9241b43.jpg

Boater14
08-08-2016, 09:12 AM
Norm, I implore you as a democrat who voted for Arlin specter a reep. If you vote for a reep senator or a reep congressman you are voting for McConnell and Ryan. You are voting for a reep judiciary committee to stonewall obama's court pick. You need to update your thinking. Your vote for a reep governor made a warren pick for VP impossible even if Hillary had wanted her. You need to entertain the possibility that you are wrong. I got to observe that only a real heater would go to the trouble to switch parties to vote against the new parties candidate. Real haters out there.

TomF
08-08-2016, 09:38 AM
I see similarities between the Republican party and Big Tobacco.

I also see similarities between thoughtful conservatives and pipe smoking.

Waddie
08-08-2016, 01:10 PM
Here the only choice on local politicians or issues is Democrat. So I register as a Democrat to vote in the primary. In the general most of the Democrats run un-opposed, so the real choices are in the primary. Then I re-register as a Republican for the general, which probably insures that my vote never gets counted.... :)

regards,
Waddie

switters
08-08-2016, 02:01 PM
Indy to blue team for the Bern, switching back.

johnw
08-08-2016, 02:01 PM
I see similarities between the Republican party and Big Tobacco.

I also see similarities between thoughtful conservatives and pipe smoking.

Not surprising, since their playbook was written by a lawyer who represented the tobacco industry.

http://billmoyers.com/content/the-powell-memo-a-call-to-arms-for-corporations/

hokiefan
08-08-2016, 02:35 PM
A party of two.

Make that three. I grew up in a conservative house, considered myself center-right and voted generally Republican for many years. Then I got a bit older, had a few life experiences, and learned a few things. And realized that the Republicans had tacked hard to the right. I remember being uncomfortable with the whole Moral Majority thing which is what started me thinking. The when McCain chose Sarah Palin as his running mate I realized I could not vote Republican in that election. So Obama was the first Democrat I ever voted for for the Presidency. Unless the Republican party changes dramatically I can't see myself voting Republican ever again.

I posted this originally on Saturday, but Scot took exception for a comment I made in another thread. I stand by my severe distaste for Trump, but I'll try to be more tasteful in my wording.

Cheers,

Bobby