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The Bigfella
07-26-2016, 11:22 PM
Kittycat. 12' catamaran, banned from the Interdominion series (Australia vs New Zealand) because it was too fast.

So.... what did you learn in?

https://photos.smugmug.com/Random-Gallery-Two/i-fN6j8sw/0/X3/Kittycat-X3.jpg

Canoeyawl
07-26-2016, 11:32 PM
A "Winnabout" Sloop (built at Lowell's Boat Shop, Amesbury, Mass)

(Evolved into the Town Class Sloop, great little daysailer's I don't know why they are not popular today)

http://sailboatdata.com/imagehelper.asp?file_id=3793

Jimmy W
07-26-2016, 11:37 PM
14 foot Hobie Cat

David G
07-26-2016, 11:41 PM
A boat! Though 'learned to sail' suggests a proficiency which may be a bit grandiose in my case <G>

phiil
07-26-2016, 11:45 PM
A Sailfish, plywood but factory built, not from a kit. The smaller of the two sizes. Dad bought it from the factory in, I think, Waerbury CT about 1955 or so.

Arizona Bay
07-26-2016, 11:53 PM
Heavy wooden flat bottom skiffs at the Norwalk CT Coast Guard station back in the mid '60's.

Gerarddm
07-27-2016, 12:20 AM
Tech dinghy doing the winter Frostbite Series at the Newport Yacht Club, mid-70s.

skuthorp
07-27-2016, 12:47 AM
Old, heavy ex navy 12ft dinghy with a gaff rig and canvas sail. Half the weight would have been grey paint.
On Albert Park Lake with the sea scouts. One of the GP circuits now
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/55/Albert_park_aerial.jpg

There used to be another island at the far end, we had to sail a figure 8 solo. I was about 10 I think.
Sea Scouts are the furthest building but one in that row on the right.

Dave Hadfield
07-27-2016, 01:30 AM
An 11ft styrofoam Sea Snark.

https://s20.postimg.org/8uufb3mjh/image.jpg (https://postimg.org/image/v6s84hlnd/)images hosting (https://postimage.org/)

From Stag Island in the St. Clair river. There were 3 of us little boys off having adventures every day the wind came from the South. Very S and A.

Good thing it was unsinkable...

Nicholas Carey
07-27-2016, 01:33 AM
International 470. Nothing like coming off the trapeze on a bad tack and catapulting into the main whilst the boat capsizes. Bruises are my middle name.

OTOH, it teaches yo u a lot about balance and se sensitivity.

stromborg
07-27-2016, 01:39 AM
I thought I learned to sail in a Naples Sabot. It was a pram, about eight feet long and had a little red shoe on the sail but a dagger board instead of a lee board. As best I can tell it was a variant of the Glen-L Sabotina.

Todd Bradshaw
07-27-2016, 04:00 AM
Sunfish, followed by Hobie 14s, 16s and 18s, but I really didn't learn much about sails and sail shaping until I got my Star.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
07-27-2016, 04:12 AM
RNSA 14:

http://www.bmpt.org.uk/pnbpt_historic_boats/Admiralty-Pattern-14-Ft-Sailing-Dinghy/fig_03.jpg

http://www.bmpt.org.uk/pnbpt_historic_boats/Admiralty-Pattern-14-Ft-Sailing-Dinghy/fig_01.jpg

skuthorp
07-27-2016, 04:18 AM
I still hanker after one of those ACB.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
07-27-2016, 04:21 AM
I still hanker after one of those ACB.

So do I, but I think they are just about extinct, now. The problem is that they were intended to have a reasonable performance for racing, so they were lightly (but well) built and spruce planked. This is not a recipe for long life in a clinker dinghy. The RN replaced them with the much more robust GRP Bosun dinghy, which has just been replaced in turn by the ASC (I have sons in the Sea Cadets...)

I have not seen an RNSA 14 in sailing order for many years now.

http://marinefilm.co.uk/PageImages/14ftRNSA.jpg

PeterSibley
07-27-2016, 04:25 AM
A boat! Though 'learned to sail' suggests a proficiency which may be a bit grandiose in my case <G>

Seconded .:D

AndyG
07-27-2016, 04:41 AM
...thorough reading of Ransome's books, from the age of seven.

A few years later my Dad bought a Mirror, but I quickly jumped ship and started racing in Enterprises largely due to a particularly enlightened secondary school and its teachers who were willing to give up their Wednesday evenings and Saturdays. In terms of real education, I can't think of anything better than letting a thirteen year-old boy take responsibility of a boat and crew.

Andy

Chris249
07-27-2016, 04:41 AM
I thought I learned to sail in a Naples Sabot. It was a pram, about eight feet long and had a little red shoe on the sail but a dagger board instead of a lee board. As best I can tell it was a variant of the Glen-L Sabotina.

I think you'll find they were both based on the original 1939 design Sabot.

Chris249
07-27-2016, 04:44 AM
First sail was on my dad's 16 Foot Skiff, successor to his Southern Zone champ Daring, the first ply chine skiff to win a title. I was three, so I just avoided all the feet.
I started to learn to sail on a Colleen; a 25 footer, sort of like a cut-down Dragon. Still haven't learned; never will.

obscured by clouds
07-27-2016, 05:06 AM
owning a boatyard, we were never short of boats to play with. My first sailing experience was on a Dragon. dad then acquired a merlin [pre rocket ] but soon decided it was to much for a 9 yr old and my13 year old cousin to handle so swapped it for a Mirror [no 650]. When that was sold on, there was a variety of other dinghies such as a wayfarer, bass boat, snipe, GP14 etc.
We salvaged another Dragon in 67 and so I went back into keelboats. I gave up sailing in the early 70's to go surfing. My cousin Rob stayed with it - offshore and ended up writing a column for Yachts and Yachting and then becoming a famous yacht designer.

lupussonic
07-27-2016, 05:29 AM
Hail of swearing and freezing water.

I'm still at it.

Peerie Maa
07-27-2016, 05:32 AM
Wayfarer, on Grafham Water.
http://www.nvgc.org.uk/images/imagegallery/imagegallerymidi/GrafhamWater1.jpg

Willin'
07-27-2016, 05:57 AM
On the Thames River in Groton, CT in a Widgeon, while I was in the Navy.

http://www.ggarchives.com/images/BangorPunta/ODdaySailboats/BPODY-002-1967-C-CAT/Widgeon04.jpg

Then, a few years later in Newport Beach beginning sailing was taught on Lido 14s...

http://www.norcalsailing.com/entries/2012/08/12/lido14/Racingtop.jpg

Intermediate on Shields...

http://newimages.yachtworld.com/resize/1/17/70/3861770_20150812083153251_1_XLARGE.jpg?f=/1/17/70/3861770_20150812083153251_1_XLARGE.jpg&w=800&h=534&t=1439397122000

A great way to take advantage of the GI Bill. :ycool:

Chris Coose
07-27-2016, 06:00 AM
A bluejay I got out of the Marblehead dump and fixed up. Next was a Hustler built by Farnum Butler on Mount Desert Island. Then Victoria in 1974.

The Bigfella
07-27-2016, 06:25 AM
I got co-opted in as crew by my brother after he came back from the Nationals in Perth.

I'd just turned 14 and he'd moved from being crew to having the use of this boat. That's him on trapeze during the Nationals, in Perth.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff112/igatenby/iansecond/kittykatsmall.jpg (http://s240.photobucket.com/user/igatenby/media/iansecond/kittykatsmall.jpg.html)

My first go as skipper was at 15, out around Split Solitary, the island to the left here, then over to Solitary Island for a look and back into the Harbour.

http://photovoltaicpoetry.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/wet-surf_wb.jpg

Starting point for that trip was a couple of hundred metres this side of where this photo was taken (from the northern wall). Out the Harbour, turn left, around the island... out a bit... home. Easy eh?

The wind got up a bit, but it wasn't too bad... which, considering that Debbie and the other girl I had crewing, had never sailed before. We didn't fly the spinnaker. :p

Paul Pless
07-27-2016, 06:58 AM
wooden snipe

Keith Wilson
07-27-2016, 07:01 AM
In an old fiberglass Sunfish, on Cass Lake in northern Minnesota at age 35.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/41/8d/a8/418da8c3c295e06a1dd4ff065efd2a1c.jpghttp://www.minnesotanorthwoods.com/_assets/images/lakes/Cass-Lake-Depth.png

Paul Pless
07-27-2016, 07:03 AM
tell us about lake windigo

Reynard38
07-27-2016, 07:12 AM
8' Dyer dink with a sail rig, and a Blue Jay at the Huntington Harbor Yacht Club.

Keith Wilson
07-27-2016, 07:25 AM
tell us about lake WindigoOh, right, the lake in an island in a lake. It's not very big, and I think it exists because the lake level is lower than it used to be. The northern part of the shore is pretty narrow and sandy, and I think Windigo used to be a bay of the larger lake. It's a legitimate lake though, a great place for the kids to go catch sunfish. Cedar Island used to have a cabin on it, but I think it's now uninhabited, as are the Potato Islands.

TomF
07-27-2016, 07:31 AM
Albacore, over a series of summers at. Camp on Georgian Bay. Did a lot canoe tripping out of the same camps.

Duncan Gibbs
07-27-2016, 07:37 AM
A Minnow on Cardinia Reservoir and then an H28 off Bunbury.

Bobcat
07-27-2016, 07:42 AM
An El Toro and then a 10 foot cat rigged pram in Lake Washington and in the San Juan Islands.

mmd
07-27-2016, 07:48 AM
Ahh... well... ummm...

A gaff-rigged bald-headed sloop fishing boat about 24 feet long, built by a long-dead unnamed builder and used for bait fishing by the guy next-door to my grandfather's in Vogler's Cove, NS. Manila cordage (damn, that stuff hurts!) and cotton canvas sails, a monster plate of iron for a centerboard, and paint layers thicker than the planking. Mostly what I remember is the smell. I would have been around seven or eight years old at the time I was allowed to do more than be a passenger, which I had done since I was about four or so..

bamamick
07-27-2016, 07:59 AM
A Gulf Coast Fish class sloop, and a Carl Alberg designed boat called a South Coast 21. My first purchase was a brand new Sunfish, the only new boat I have ever bought.

Good memories, there.

Mickey Lake

TomF
07-27-2016, 08:01 AM
Ahh... well... ummm...

A gaff-rigged bald-headed sloop fishing boat about 24 feet long, built by a long-dead unnamed builder and used for bait fishing by the guy next-door to my grandfather's in Vogler's Cove, NS. Manila cordage (damn, that stuff hurts!) and cotton canvas sails, a monster plate of iron for a centerboard, and paint layers thicker than the planking. Mostly what I remember is the smell. I would have been around seven or eight years old at the time I was allowed to do more than be a passenger, which I had done since I was about four or so..mmd wins.

The Bigfella
07-27-2016, 08:26 AM
mmd wins.

Everyone wins a prize on this thread.

Garret
07-27-2016, 08:29 AM
Dyer Dhows - graduating up to Blue Jays & another one who learned in Norwalk CT. In a sailing class I took, I got the "prize" (a bailer) for the most capsizes. I had trouble figuring out the "controlled" part of a gybe. :)

carlg
07-27-2016, 08:30 AM
Tech dinghy.

David G
07-27-2016, 08:38 AM
And my kids learned to sail (again... a phrase that promises more than can be delivered) in the Goat Island Skiff - which we built as a family.

Though the older one also spent some time in various rental boats - while stationed at Yokasuka, Japan. At a Navy Sailing Club that had been started by one of my fellow Coots, when HE was stationed there... lo, these many decades ago.

Norman Bernstein
07-27-2016, 08:46 AM
Like many, a Sunfish, at age 12, at sleepaway camp in PA.

Later, age 16 or so, my Dad got me a 'Sea Snark', which was a cheap polystyrene sailboat, with no f'glass skin whatsoever, which I sailed a few times on Barnegat Bay, in NJ.

In college, I joined Community Boating, on the Charles River, and sailed 15' Mercurys.. a little.

I didn't sail again until age 34, when I bought my first 'real' boat, a brand new Catalina 30.

Ian McColgin
07-27-2016, 08:53 AM
As a child we sailed on a home made Sailfish and Mom's Cape Cod Knockabout but my first 'independent command' was a cat rigged flattie when I was nine. Given Mom's good training, I was promoted up to Town Class right a way, several years younger than the other kids allowed out in the Townies. So while it was the fourth type of boat where I acted as skipper and while I spent far more of my childhood and youth to age 16 in the Knockabout, I still view the Townie as my first real command.

mmd
07-27-2016, 08:59 AM
Yup, no winners, only sailors.

Besides, you guys had the advantage of cool store-bought stuff and the ability to just go out and play with your sailboat (and no dead fish smell!); I was always constrained to having to go someplace to do something that was usually painful or boring.

Upshur
07-27-2016, 09:06 AM
took my first class up in Harbor Springs just a few years ago...in my 50s'( i was a soaring pilot and always wanted to try sailing) ...we went out in a 15 footer in 20 knot gusts...in a half an hour we performed a rescue at sea{ small power dingy lost engine , we were about to tow it when it finally started, then we busted the forward main stay...i had to take the controls and keep the kid from getting swept off while he rigged it....i liked it, felt alive..i was hooked. Bought a 1959 Alcort Sunfish and restored it,,sailed the hell out of it...then laser, and then lightning. if i lived on a big water I would love to own an off shore racer of some kind. Sail occasionally now. rowing almost daily....before the sun rises..love it.

wizbang 13
07-27-2016, 09:12 AM
40 ' Searunner tri, ketch rigged.
My older brother ran the first multi hull to do day trips from St Maarten to St Barts in 1974. I first stepped aboard a sailing vessel when I was 20, as his crew.
Within 3 months I bought my Seabird Yawl.

Garret
07-27-2016, 09:28 AM
40 ' Searunner tri, ketch rigged.
My older brother ran the first multi hull to do day trips from St Maarten to St Barts in 1974. I first stepped aboard a sailing vessel when I was 20, as his crew.
Within 3 months I bought my Seabird Yawl.

Was he still running it in the late 80's? I worked in St. Marten for a few months & did a condo tour to get a "free" sail over to St Barts & back. The condo salesman wasn't happy with me, but the trip was a lot of fun - as the crew was friendly (it is the Friendly Island after all) & actually sailed the boat most all the way.

wizbang 13
07-27-2016, 09:34 AM
By the eighties, Spronk cats were being used. You may have sailed over on "Maho", one of the best looking cats ever launched(imo),
then later, Eagle, which was a higher volume,different looking boat.

amish rob
07-27-2016, 09:42 AM
A windsurfer. That's why I used to have muscles.
The first actual boat I drove was a dumb little boxy pram with a lateen rig, maybe a sunfish or somesuch. Even playing Nadia Comaneci to fit in it didn't bother me. And going really slow didn't either, because I was just sitting there, contorted and cramping, but gliding across the little bay.

I still am amazed sailboats work at all...

Garret
07-27-2016, 09:56 AM
By the eighties, Spronk cats were being used. You may have sailed over on "Maho", one of the best looking cats ever launched(imo),
then later, Eagle, which was a higher volume,different looking boat.

I think it was "Maho" - that rings a bell. It was a great day off for a guy working (illegally) on repairs on a small hotel.

CWSmith
07-27-2016, 10:14 AM
I learned to sail in a 420 (top) and my passion for the 505 (bottom) began there.

http://www.nosa.bc.ca/images/420_Class_Sailing_Boat.jpg

http://archive.sailingscuttlebutt.com/photos/07/1102/martin.JPG

devout
07-27-2016, 11:49 AM
In a Laser, on Doha Bay, Qatar. In my fifties! I guess that happens if you are all alone in a foreign country with nothing to do over weekends :D

https://scontent-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/13876575_10154418020233417_5713093538460968690_n.j pg?oh=191bdb42c93b270eb79a2b9bb3c42865&oe=5819B1C8


Quickly moved onto this. I understood it to be a custom-built F1 boat (whatever that may mean), all carbon, even the mast. It is wickedly fast.


https://scontent-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/13659207_10154418020163417_2761949221262156236_n.j pg?oh=781dc601b784306057f90d270fc1aa5e&oe=582D2AC4

Cheers

gilberj
07-27-2016, 11:59 AM
First time at the helm age 3 1/2 sailing a gaff cat Akroid 14'dinghy, I have a photo somewhere and remember it quite clearly. I was allowed to mess with any of the boats at the cottage as long as I stayed in the bay within sight, from about the age of 4 (when I could swim) we had an assortment of canoes and rowing boats. My favorite as a small guy was our plywood pootsy pram, as the others were a bit heavy for me to handle. At 11 I had my first (own) sailboat a 10 foot flatty skiff with a lateen canoe sail and canoe leeboards. We also had a 14 foot gaff cat dinghy that I was allowed to take out perhaps at 14yo

switters
07-27-2016, 01:25 PM
laser at 17YO

AndyG
07-27-2016, 03:01 PM
laser at 17YO

I couldn't keep a Laser up at 17. A sail in one was nothing more than a sequence of inevitable capsizes. Me at 120lbs and no reduced rig didn't help.

Andy

johnw
07-27-2016, 03:15 PM
In a MerryMac sailboat built by Ned MacIntosh, in Portsmouth Harbor, when I was 8.

http://www.piperboatworks.com/uploads/1/8/0/5/18053783/3295572_orig.jpg

J.Madison
07-27-2016, 04:34 PM
My first sail was in the schooner Zodiac at age 13. I spent a very formative week aboard. My first solo sail was in the little lapstrake tender they carried on the side rail. I later learned that they dipped the rail unexpectedly, filled the little boat with water and it broke in half. Too bad.
http://8795-presscdn-0-90.pagely.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Schooner-Zodiac-in-San-Juan-Islands.jpg

BETTY-B
07-27-2016, 04:55 PM
Opti at some lake in Washington. Then lasers at LBC on Lake Washington.

switters
07-27-2016, 05:04 PM
I couldn't keep a Laser up at 17. A sail in one was nothing more than a sequence of inevitable capsizes. Me at 120lbs and no reduced rig didn't help.

Andy

After some lessons with a camp counselor I would always have another camper out with me and never in much wind that I can recall. It was a church camp, so some capsizes came in handy for a bit of unsupervised social time. This experience also led to the expression, "those girls are here to get to know Jesus better, not you".

CK 17
07-27-2016, 05:17 PM
Boy Scout camp using a sunfish.

lowells boat shop, amesbury ma, in one of these. . . Rigged just like this. This might even be the boat.

https://s20.postimg.org/i5ozpturh/image.jpg

later in life, at the NNYC using flying Scott's.

still learning on an oday26

John B
07-27-2016, 05:35 PM
P class like most of my generation here. They are a 7 ft snub bow hard chine training class renowned for nose diving.https://themightypclass.org.nz/home/
I was about 10 years old.
After that I went petrol head until an epiphany of sorts. We were camping in the Abel Tasman park when I was 22 or so, and I saw some trailer sailors and the LFH ' the leeboard ketch' drying out in the lagoon.
So we went back home , bought a windsurfer to sail for a season , bought Waione the next year. ( 41 ft 1907 keel yacht)

johnw
07-27-2016, 05:39 PM
P class like most of my generation here. They are a 7 ft snub bow hard chine training class renowned for nose diving.https://themightypclass.org.nz/home/
I was about 10 years old.
After that I went petrol head until an epiphany of sorts. We were camping in the Abel Tasman park when I was 22 or so, and I saw some trailer sailors and the LFH ' the leeboard ketch' drying out in the lagoon.
So we went back home , bought a windsurfer to sail for a season , bought Waione the next year. ( 41 ft 1907 keel yacht)

What charmed you about the boats lying on the hard?

The Bigfella
07-27-2016, 05:42 PM
What year were you windsurfing, John? When I moved to NZ at the end of '83, I bought one of the original Windsurfers.. and used to sail it off Mellons Bay, or down Pakuranga / Half Moon Bay way at times. I could be home from work and on the water in 10 minutes. Loved it. Kept that up until early '86 when I was transported back to the main colony...

B_B
07-27-2016, 05:51 PM
420 on Glenmore Reservoir, Calgary, then, successively, a 15' Seaspray Catamaran, 20' O'Day, 35' Fantasia, and lastly a 10' Walker Bay dinghy.
Like David G, amongst others, I'm still learning.

John B
07-27-2016, 06:21 PM
What charmed you about the boats lying on the hard?
We were camping John, and those guys had the freedom to make their own way there by sea in their own boats which struck me as being a great thing to do or be able to do. And because I liked 'vintage ' the LFH boat particularly resonated. It was the Frenchmans inlet , so they had navigated in through an entrance that was hidden and possibly only 20 ft wide or so, all very cool.
About 20 years later my friends owned that boat and I met one of the old owners from 1981 or 2. It was brand new then , first season. It was fun telling her that story.
Anyway , back in Auckland the next year the windsurfing was fun while we were learning, but became more interesting when we actually went somewhere.
So we went looking at vintage boats , I missed a couple and then settled on Waione, which is where we re learned the basics and discovered that out on a boat there was no one to tell you what to do. It was your responsibilty to miss hard things and cope with whatever the weather threw at you.

We're very lucky with our Hauraki gulf, its big and there are hundreds of places to go. As I often repeat , after 30 odd years ,every season we look for somewhere to anchor we've never been before,we always manage to. Last season several bays and anchorages we never even considered before.

It must have been 82 the windsurfing, Ian. It was all Kohimaramara / Mission bay etc for us.

johnw
07-27-2016, 08:27 PM
Thank you, John B.

Upshur
07-27-2016, 09:15 PM
A windsurfer. That's why I used to have muscles.
The first actual boat I drove was a dumb little boxy pram with a lateen rig, maybe a sunfish or somesuch. Even playing Nadia Comaneci to fit in it didn't bother me. And going really slow didn't either, because I was just sitting there, contorted and cramping, but gliding across the little bay.

I still am amazed sailboats work at all...
windsurfers are cool, hope to get one before I get too feeble to use it.

Breakaway
07-27-2016, 11:42 PM
A sailfish, a snark, a Hobie 14, a Bluejay, a J24, a Tartan 10 ( we weren't supposed to take that one off the mooring ourselves, but my bud's dad was at work so how would he know....) ....there were sailboats around, none of which we owned, but which opportunity to sail aboard was plentiful.

Kevin

skuthorp
07-28-2016, 02:14 AM
"I still am amazed sailboats work at all…"
When you are sitting becalmed in the middle of a mirror flat bay and the air temperature is over 30c similar thoughts cross my mind. I always carry a proper paddle, have you ever tried to paddle home after a gear failure with one of those arm paddle things?

isla
07-28-2016, 02:47 AM
I'm still learning to sail Y:o

My first sailboat was a 26ft GRP bilge keeled sloop, which I fitted out from a bare hull starting in 1974, and launched in the Mersey in 1976. So I was cruising in my own boat and learning to sail at the same time. My wife had sailed a lot with her father and older brother back in the US, so she was the skipper, and my sailing instructor, until I got the hang of it. To be honest, all these years later she still is. I'm the one who studied navigation and took the RYA courses, so theoretically I know what I am doing, but she is definitely a more competent sailor.

Beowolf
07-28-2016, 06:32 AM
...Catalina 27. Running the course on Lake St Claire on Thursday nights.

I'm fairly certain that no one needs to see a picture of one. :)

Lots of fun on those nights.

moTthediesel
07-28-2016, 08:28 AM
An 11ft styrofoam Sea Snark.

https://s20.postimg.org/8uufb3mjh/image.jpg (https://postimg.org/image/v6s84hlnd/)images hosting (https://postimage.org/)

From Stag Island in the St. Clair river. There were 3 of us little boys off having adventures every day the wind came from the South. Very S and A.

Good thing it was unsinkable...

Me too Dave -- an auspicious start to a life before the mast, eh? Mine was also one of the early, uncoated foam ones. (For you unfortunate uninitiated, later Snarks were polyethylene coated.) This is a picture I found online -- not of me and my early sailing cronies, but if that was the Thousand Islands, it could be. I long for those halcyon days of Styrofoam ships and iron kids.

Tom

http://www.summersailstice.com/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/Snark%3AWinnepesaukee.jpg?itok=7BG9TxXG

Canoez
07-28-2016, 08:50 AM
My first time sailing was downwind in a catamaran made from a pair of 16' canoes with 12' poles lashed to the thwarts. Steering was via paddles and the sail was a 10'x12' nylon tarp deployed much like a spinnaker but without the shape. (Caution : don't sail downwind further than you're willing to paddle back!)

Two weeks ago, I finally bit the bullet and took a sailing class with our hosts to truly learn to sail. We were using their fleet of Herreshoff 12-1/2's and Joel White designed Haven 12-1/2's. It was wonderful - I'll be back to improve my skills, but we certainly came away with decent confidence to handle the boats and the weather.

Todd D
07-28-2016, 08:55 AM
I learned to sail on a Luders 44 in 1970.

http://documents.clubexpress.com/clubs/873452/graphics/AlertHarborfest.jpg

I first sailed in a Sea Snark with a friend in '69, but didn't actually learn to sail until the next year.

StevenBauer
07-28-2016, 07:15 PM
I learned to sail at Camp Sloane in Lakeville, Connecticut. It was a full keel boat with standing rigging and all. It was big and spacious. Three of us went out at a time. The two other kids in my boat didn't want to be skipper so I had the tiller all the time. The other two handled the sheets for the main and jib. I think there were 4 or 5 boats so we had some mini regattas.
The boats were O'day Sprites. While in my memory they were huge keelboats, years later I came across one at the boat launch. They were just 10' long. And tiny. The tiniest little keel boat. :)

A couple of years later we moved to a town with a lake and my dad got us an Alcort Sunfish. Brand new, red and white striped sails. $350. Every day, all summer long, my mom dropped my brother and I off at the lake. If it was windy we took out the sunfish, if it wasn't we took out the 12' Sears aluminum rowboat.


Steven