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The Bigfella
07-20-2016, 02:55 AM
The one and only time one of these was fired. 3,000 built


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VZ7FQHTaR4


http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/07/20/an_anniversary_to_remember_the_worlds_only_airtoai r_nuke_was_fired_on_19_july_1957/

PeterSibley
07-20-2016, 03:34 AM
We've been very very lucky.

Gerarddm
07-20-2016, 10:02 AM
Every one of those men developed cancer.

amish rob
07-20-2016, 10:09 AM
This kind of stuff still makes me cry.

Where would we be if we hadn't wasted history killing each other, or planning for it?

And, yet, I still am awed by the scientific accomplishment.

Peace,
Robert

biga
07-20-2016, 10:09 AM
Every one of those men developed cancer.



watch out, mike is going to call you a liar.

Jim Bow
07-20-2016, 10:56 AM
Every one of those men developed cancer.

From the Billings Gazette, Nov 2007,
"They believed there was no reason to fear that their exposure under conditions of its (the Genie's) operational use subjected them to either lingering death or physical impairment," he wrote.
Information on how healthy they remained in the years after the blast is not readily available."

biga
07-20-2016, 11:10 AM
From the Billings Gazette, Nov 2007,
"They believed there was no reason to fear that their exposure under conditions of its (the Genie's) operational use subjected them to either lingering death or physical impairment," he wrote.
Information on how healthy they remained in the years after the blast is not readily available."




i went slightly further. here's the obituary from the only KNOWN person i could find standing there... the photographer. strokes aren't cancer. therefore lies have been told.

Akira "George" Yo****ake, 84, died suddenly on Oct. 17, 2013, at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, due to complications from a stroke.
George was born in Los Angeles in 1929, the third eldest of five children of Japanese immigrants. As a 5-year-old boy, George was considered a piano prodigy who was able to correctly name a key upon hearing it played from another room.
His childhood was abruptly disrupted in 1942, after the U.S. entered World War II. George, along with his parents and siblings, were sent to the Rohwer (http://www.legacy.com/memorial-sites/internment-remembrance/?personid=167656077&affiliateID=3339), Ark., internment camp, along with thousands of Japanese Americans and Japanese nationals. Despite living an environment surrounded by barbed wire and few personal possessions, he managed to find simple pleasures in camp like snacking on baked yams and playing with friends. After the war, George returned to Los Angeles as a young teen.
He later served as a civilian photographer for the U.S. government, who shot the iconic "Ground Zero" photographs of five military men who did not wear any protective gear as they stood underneath an atomic nuclear blast in the Nevada desert in 1957. At the time, he was not aware of what his assignment would entail, until arriving at the test center that day. The New York Times and CBS News, as well as other publications, have since featured George regarding the government's atomic nuclear tests.
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/newspress/obituary.aspx?pid=167656077#sthash.zOfWzB81.dpuf

peb
07-20-2016, 02:12 PM
This kind of stuff still makes me cry.

Where would we be if we hadn't wasted history killing each other, or planning for it?

And, yet, I still am awed by the scientific accomplishment.

Peace,
Robert

Well, those weapons did a pretty good job of making sure the cold war never turned into WWIII. In my mind, I am positive we would have never avoided WWIII without nuclear arsenals. So they don't make me cry. I am rather thankful.