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View Full Version : First aid kits for boat use, what special needs are there?



skuthorp
07-10-2016, 04:06 AM
No, not bronze nails and FG patches, 1st aid for the crew!
I suppose it depends on the boat and what it's being used for. A day sailer might just need a few bandaids. A cruising yacht a different kit, a voyaging one more. I don't carry on if sailing with the club, but in my Mac. there is a permanent one as I mostly sail alone.
I'm not thinking of EPIRBS etc in this.

I have a decent kit at home, always have had since my early St John's training. But on a passaging yacht I'd probably need more and different items. If I now bought a propriety kit I get all this for about A$120.00,
2 X Bandage Crepe Heavy Duty 10cm (Support bandage)
1 X Bandage Crepe 5 cm (Support bandage)
2 X Bandage Crepe 7.5 cm (Support bandage)
1 X Tape Zinc Oxide 2.5cm x 5m (Secure Dressing/Strapping)
1 X Tape Hypoallergenic 2.5 x 9m (Secure dressings)
2 X Bandage Triangular 110x110cm (For slings,padding etc)
1 X Cold Pack Instant Disposable (Reduce swelling/pain)
1 X Dressing universal small (Wound Cover)
3 X Swabs Gauze 7.5cm 3 PK (To aid wound cleaning)
2 X Pad Combine 10 x10cm (Bleeding control)
2 X Pad Combine 10 x 20cm (Bleeding control)
2 X Pad Non Adherent 7.5 x 10cm (Wound cover)
2 X Pad Non Adherent 5 x 5cm (Wound cover)
2 X Pad Eye Sterile (Emergency eye cover)
1 X Dressing Length Adhesive 6cm x 1m (Wound Cover)
10 X Swabs Alcohol (Cleans instruments)
1 X Scissors SS Sharp/Blunt 12.5cm (Cut dressings/bandages)
1 X Sheers Trauma Scissors 14cm (Cut clothing)
1 X Forceps SS Splinter Pointed (Removing splinters)
2 X Blanket Emergency Shock (Retain body warmth)
1 X Pins Safety 12 PK (Secure wound cover)
1 X Notepad & Pencil (Record vital information)
2 X Bag Plastic specimen (Severed parts/other uses)
10 X Aerowash Eyewash/Wound Irrigation 15ml (Eye/Wound Irrigation)
5 X Primapore Dressing 8.6cm x 6cm (Wound cover)
1 X Adhesive Strips Plastic 50PK (Minor wound cover)
1 X Adhesive Strips Fabric 50 PK (Minor wound cover)
1 X Splinter Probes disposable 5PK (Removing deep splinters)
10 X Swab Antiseptic (Clean skin/wounds)
2 X Stingose Sachets 3 ml 5PK (Soothes bites/stings)
4 X Sunscreen Sachets 30+ 10ml (Sun Protection)
5 X Glove Disposable Nitrile Large Pair (Hygiene)
1 X Guide Emergency First Aid (Easy Read Book)
1 X Resuscitation Protection Shield (To aid resuscitation)

I don'r have all of that, but I have some different items, like the battle dressings.

Discuss please?

PeterSibley
07-10-2016, 04:39 AM
Add silver burn dressings .... something I've found to be amazingly helpful... personally . They healed a burn in a few days that I had expected to keep my hand useless for at least 6 weeks . I think burn injuries could be very serious on a boat, apart from the pain the incapacity could stop you from handling the boat.

The Bigfella
07-10-2016, 04:53 AM
The entitlement generation seems less inclined to take care of themselves. They call for a helicopter if they get thirsty these days, rather than dealing with it themselves.

My kit focuses a lot less on the dressings, more on the meds. A tee shirt makes plenty of dressings. I carry a fresh bottle of Betadine, a selection of fungal / antiseptic creams, bitie stuff (antihistamines) and some industrial strength painkillers. An around-the-world mate carries the same pain meds (Endone / Targin). I found out the hard way that these aren't any good for chronic toothache, although I didn't hook into them, was told that though when I was considering it... so Panadol should feature. Yes to the space blanket too. I also carry a couple of "in case" meds... eg antibiotics for skin and lung issues.

One tip I have seen for trips where space is tight... repackage creams, etc in drinking straws.. heat seal the ends (use needlenose pliers as a temp seal / heat sink while you do it... and label them).

Canoeyawl
07-10-2016, 04:57 AM
Sutures and forceps, (sterile), Lidocaine and a syringe, poweful twezzers, and powerful pain meds for say, a back injury.
(A sterile, disposable suture kit is readily available)

Hopefully you will never need them, but I have had to sew myself up twice, 1st time with a sraight needle and cotton thread, no anesthetic! The second time I had sutures...

PeterSibley
07-10-2016, 05:04 AM
The entitlement generation seems less inclined to take care of themselves. They call for a helicopter if they get thirsty these days, rather than dealing with it themselves.

My kit focuses a lot less on the dressings, more on the meds. A tee shirt makes plenty of dressings. I carry a fresh bottle of Betadine, a selection of fungal / antiseptic creams, bitie stuff (antihistamines) and some industrial strength painkillers. An around-the-world mate carries the same pain meds (Endone / Targin). I found out the hard way that these aren't any good for chronic toothache, although I didn't hook into them, was told that though when I was considering it... so Panadol should feature. Yes to the space blanket too. I also carry a couple of "in case" meds... eg antibiotics for skin and lung issues.

One tip I have seen for trips where space is tight... repackage creams, etc in drinking straws.. heat seal the ends (use needlenose pliers as a temp seal / heat sink while you do it... and label them).

I found Nurophen very good for toothache Ian. (Ibuprofen under any trade name.)

Phillip Allen
07-10-2016, 06:43 AM
something to cut hardened hooks

Paul Pless
07-10-2016, 06:46 AM
something to cut hardened hooks

Good suggestion

The Bigfella
07-10-2016, 06:58 AM
Don't remind me... put one through a finger outside Sydney Heads once. Ugh

skuthorp
07-10-2016, 07:17 AM
I would have thought that would be in the tool kit. When remote walking I always carried a small box with scalpel blades, needles and sutures, and if there was room and I could get it some anaesthetic spray. Elastic bandages?

Hwyl
07-10-2016, 07:42 AM
Duct tape, I'm serious.
I've used it to hold on Scop' patches. There's a way of sewing wounds together using duct tape (I've yet to try that).

PeterSibley
07-10-2016, 07:45 AM
Duct tape, I'm serious.
I've used it to hold on Scop' patches. There's a way of sewing wounds together using duct tape (I've yet to try that).

Superglue too....as I was informed by an emergency nurse of my acquaintance today.

skuthorp
07-10-2016, 07:51 AM
I learnt a lot of taping techniques fro old medical books dad had. You can create a virtual muscle on the outside if you understand what is underneath. Rather in the manner of these, though these are modern. A bandage called Coban which will not stick to the wound is very good.
https://www.elastoplast.com.au/~/media/Hansaplast/local/au/strapping-and-injuries/taping-and-strapping/protecting-the-knee.jpg?la=en-AU&mw=570 https://www.elastoplast.com.au/~/media/Hansaplast/local/au/strapping-and-injuries/taping-and-strapping/ankle-protection.jpg?la=en-AU&mw=570

wizbang 13
07-10-2016, 08:40 AM
Powdered charcoal,powdered red pepper,codeine,slippery elm powder.
Tape and Tee's.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
07-10-2016, 09:04 AM
In a really small boat out for the afternoon - roll of duct tape and a sponge.

Todd D
07-10-2016, 09:45 AM
A friend used to have a pretty comprehensive kit including scalpels, retractors, various clamps, a variety of sutures and a pretty comprehensive selection of drugs. He was a doctor though.

B_B
07-10-2016, 10:49 AM
Epi-pen or similar.

edit - and I agree with Hwyl - duct tape and some gauze. Depending on how much space you have all those specialized medical devices (scissors, forceps) are space takers for which you have adequate non-specific substitutes.

B_B
07-10-2016, 11:13 AM
When we went on our cruise last year we couldn't get any meds for our kit in Florida - they're very strict on pain-killers especially. Fortunately a month or so before we left I caught a sliver from the dock.

I pulled it out, was in pain for a couple days, thought something was still in there, cut myself open with a scalpel, couldn't find it, left it alone. A red streak started up my leg so I went to a walk-in clinic for anti-biotics, Dr. rooted around in my foot for 10 minutes and "can't feel anything". She asked me if I was in pain so I explained to her our situation re. pain meds in case something happened on the boat, and while I was in a little discomfort at that time I'd appreciate some meds for "in case things get worse" nudge nudge wink wink. She very kindly scripted a bunch of T3's and a re-fill. I took a chance on my foot clearing up, kept the anti-biotics and T3's for future use. Few days later a half inch sliver slid out from my heel and the infection cleared up.

That's duct tape residue :D

http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i238/BraamBerrub/IMG_20150617_110248.jpg

http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i238/BraamBerrub/IMG_20150617_111040.jpg

David W Pratt
07-10-2016, 11:41 AM
Good manual on wilderness medicine?
I've heard "Don't take any thing you don't know how to use"
I guess the corollary would be, learn to use everything you take
Enema equip for constipation and fluid replacement
A physician sometimes comes in handy

wizbang 13
07-10-2016, 12:06 PM
When we went on our cruise last year we couldn't get any meds for our kit in Florida - they're very strict on pain-killers especially. Fortunately a month or so before we left I caught a sliver from the dock.

I pulled it out, was in pain for a couple days, thought something was still in there, cut myself open with a scalpel, couldn't find it, left it alone. A red streak started up my leg so I went to a walk-in clinic for anti-biotics, Dr. rooted around in my foot for 10 minutes and "can't feel anything". She asked me if I was in pain so I explained to her our situation re. pain meds in case something happened on the boat, and while I was in a little discomfort at that time I'd appreciate some meds for "in case things get worse" nudge nudge wink wink. She very kindly scripted a bunch of T3's and a re-fill. I took a chance on my foot clearing up, kept the anti-biotics and T3's for future use. Few days later a half inch sliver slid out from my heel and the infection cleared up.

That's duct tape residue :D

http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i238/BraamBerrub/IMG_20150617_110248.jpg

http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i238/BraamBerrub/IMG_20150617_111040.jpg


A charcoal /castor oil poultice will pull that out and any poison (wood preservative from dock) .
Of course, not all people care for natural techniques.

Rum_Pirate
07-10-2016, 04:13 PM
A charcoal /castor oil poultice will pull that out and any poison (wood preservative from dock) .
Of course, not all people care for natural techniques.

or Magnesium Sulphate paste would do the same thing.

skuthorp
07-10-2016, 04:19 PM
or a soap and sugar poultice.

htom
07-10-2016, 07:20 PM
Wilderness kit + insect repel, bite, reaction + sunscreen (large quantities) + sunburn treatment (large quantities) + water water water. Communications, training, and paper reference.

Chip-skiff
07-10-2016, 07:24 PM
Wilderness kit + insect repel, bite, reaction + sunscreen (large quantities) + sunburn treatment (large quantities) + water water water. Communications, training, and paper reference.

Sunscreen (water-resistant, high SPF) is very important, for instance if you end up clinging to a turtled hull for any length of time. Sunblock cream or paste is also good, for noses and the tops of ears (and bald heads).

PeterSibley
07-10-2016, 07:40 PM
and hands.... it's surprising how many melanomas appear on hands.

The Bigfella
07-10-2016, 08:03 PM
Sunscreen (water-resistant, high SPF) is very important, for instance if you end up clinging to a turtled hull for any length of time. Sunblock cream or paste is also good, for noses and the tops of ears (and bald heads).

It's deadly on coral though. Kills it off, big time.

The Bigfella
07-10-2016, 08:31 PM
Ahh, yes... epi-pens. I carry 5 when in remote areas - to match the adrenaline dosage required during one of my anaphylaxis treatments.

The other essentials I forgot are the anti-spew and anti-poop pills, along with the re-hydrating powders. I also carry up to three different water treatment regimes - mostly just use the Steripen though. It's a UV treatment.

WX
07-10-2016, 08:41 PM
Our rescue boats carry very comprehensive kits including Defib and oxygen but we are not allowed to administer even a Panadol.

bluedog225
07-11-2016, 09:18 PM
I like to think about it by injury. Whatever seems likely:

Fire-put them out. Burn treatments.
Airway. If you are qualified.
Broken bone stuff.
Bleeding stuff.
Anaphylaxis-epi and benadryl
Hypothermia and hyperthermia stuff
Sun burn treatments
Nausea
Dehydration
Sprains
Good pain meds as needed
etc

Breakaway
07-11-2016, 09:57 PM
Suoer glue
Cold packs
Splints
Duct tape
Aspirin
Burn treatments
Ace bandages
Band aids
Space blanket

I consider sunscreen daily equipment, not first aid. YMMV

The best thing you can bring is a well- prepared you. The Red Cross, US POWER SQUADRONS, others offer excellent first aid instruction courses.

Kevin

Sent from my iPhone using Forum Runner

B_B
07-11-2016, 10:34 PM
...I consider sunscreen daily equipment, not first aid. YMMV ...
Brings up a good point - is this a first aid kit (for how long, where, what size boat, what size crew etc.) or a ditch bag (first aid with additions).

When we were looking for a first aid kit in Florida we had a plethora of options. From the $9.99 specials at CVS to the $1,500 (seriously) 'entry level special', "Just for you and your young family on this adventure, I wouldn't leave without it" proffered by some superyacht outfitter (they were the only folk we cold find would dispense pain meds for a yacht leaving the US - it was a price a little beyond our budget).

ranga
07-12-2016, 01:12 AM
I'm a big fan of stuff called fixomull for smaller cuts and grazes, it's self adhesive mesh thats rather sticky and stays on way better than a bandaid.

Phil Y
07-12-2016, 04:39 AM
Our rescue boats carry very comprehensive kits including Defib and oxygen but we are not allowed to administer even a Panadol.
Panadol is a bit like a band aid. Kind of useless. Or at least unnecessary. Comforting maybe.

WX
07-12-2016, 06:46 AM
Panadol is a bit like a band aid. Kind of useless. Or at least unnecessary. Comforting maybe.

We can bandage and we can splint, we can even perform CPR and give oxygen but no drugs of any kind.

PeterSibley
07-12-2016, 07:13 AM
Not even cookies ? :d

john welsford
07-12-2016, 01:36 PM
There are very effective adhesive strips that substitute for stitches these days, its worth carrying some of these.
But during my Marine first aid cert course, I noted that the instructor made much of the injuries common on boats, burns, burns, burns, broken fingers, heavy bruising, broken arms and collarbones. She also made much of the need to carry meds for the treatment of heart problems and strokes where there was any history of circulatory disorder, said that the most common cause of death on board long range cruising yachts was heart attack.
Get your ticker checked out before casting off.

John Welsford



Sutures and forceps, (sterile), Lidocaine and a syringe, poweful twezzers, and powerful pain meds for say, a back injury.
(A sterile, disposable suture kit is readily available)

Hopefully you will never need them, but I have had to sew myself up twice, 1st time with a sraight needle and cotton thread, no anesthetic! The second time I had sutures...

lupussonic
07-12-2016, 03:00 PM
Hey Bruce, why do you carry powdered peppers in your first aid kit? I know about charcoal as an anti-poison/ antiseptic, but tell us more about natural remedies you use.

Phil Y
07-12-2016, 05:24 PM
We can bandage and we can splint, we can even perform CPR and give oxygen but no drugs of any kind.
Yep, makes pretty good sense. Mild pain meds are useless unless you are just wanting your 5 year old to stop whining. They are just about comfort, not medical necessity. Stronger pain meds need some serious training to ameliorate the risk, might react badly with other unknown meds or conditions when administered in an emergency situation, might mask relevant symptoms when the patient gets to hospital, and in a coastal rescue situation you are just dealing with short term pain management, which is after all, just about comfort, not important to the final outcome, and not medically necessary. Hold the patents hand and assure them they are in good care.

Phil Y
07-12-2016, 05:25 PM
You might not speficially put them in the first aid kit, but sanitary pads are pretty useful for managing bleeding.

WX
07-12-2016, 06:03 PM
Yep, makes pretty good sense. Mild pain meds are useless unless you are just wanting your 5 year old to stop whining. They are just about comfort, not medical necessity. Stronger pain meds need some serious training to ameliorate the risk, might react badly with other unknown meds or conditions when administered in an emergency situation, might mask relevant symptoms when the patient gets to hospital, and in a coastal rescue situation you are just dealing with short term pain management, which is after all, just about comfort, not important to the final outcome, and not medically necessary. Hold the patents hand and assure them they are in good care.

I think it's more to do with the risk of medication either masking symptoms or interfering with the follow on treatment by the paramedics when we hand them over.

WX
07-12-2016, 06:05 PM
You might not speficially put them in the first aid kit, but sanitary pads are pretty useful for managing bleeding.

The very first sanitary pads were actually repurposed shell dressings by ANZAC nursing staff during WW 1.

Phil Y
07-12-2016, 10:49 PM
I think it's more to do with the risk of medication either masking symptoms or interfering with the follow on treatment by the paramedics when we hand them over.
That too. So I think we agree it's a sensible approach.

WX
07-12-2016, 11:29 PM
That too. So I think we agree it's a sensible approach.

Romeo, Redwing out.:)

wizbang 13
07-14-2016, 10:33 AM
Hey Bruce, why do you carry powdered peppers in your first aid kit? I know about charcoal as an anti-poison/ antiseptic, but tell us more about natural remedies you use.
Red pepper will stop a heart attack . Red pepper will stop bleeding. Red pepper adds potency to all other natural cures.
http://www.naturalnews.com/035612_cayenne_pepper_healing_herbal_medicine.html