PDA

View Full Version : Finally got to ride last evening



Norman Bernstein
07-07-2016, 07:10 AM
For various reasons, my bike has been sitting in the garage, unused, all season long. It seems that there was too much going on in my life to be able to use it.... normally, in the spring and summer, I'd ride it to my office, but it seemed like I always needed to carry stuff which wouldn't fit on it... OR, the weather was bad... OR, I had to visit my mother after work... OR, I was down at the boat....

Finally, last evening, I got to take a nice long ride, and it's running like the day I bought it, 15 years ago.... still looks good, too... never dropped :)

http://www.marisystems.com/images/bike.jpg

Andrew Craig-Bennett
07-07-2016, 07:14 AM
Well done. I know the feeling.

Jim Mahan
07-07-2016, 07:29 AM
Nice Norman. Goodlooking bike.

I spent about two and a half years with this bike as my daily driver. [Internet photo, but my old bike exactly.] 750 four.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/19/d9/de/19d9de5c26f72de932f6e9019c757369.jpg

Mutha.. I just realized that was thirty years ago. I wouldn't ride a motorcycle daily where I live now. Too much freeway and traffic. Danger on a bike is proportional to proximity and the density of the traffic, and therefore the dummies, squared.

The Bigfella
07-07-2016, 07:37 AM
Something changed here a year ago that made riding so much safer.

The government actually did something less restrictive... they authorised lane filtering and lane splitting, up to 40 kph (25mph).

There's so much less worry about being rear-ended by the texting mob.... or whacked by a lane changer trying to get one car place ahead. You come up to a red light with 30 cars... sail through to the front and when the lights change, you are 100 metres away by the time the cars have gone 20 metres.

Clear air.

It's mid winter here... in Sydney at present... and the bike is my main transport these days, day or night.

Norman Bernstein
07-07-2016, 07:51 AM
Fortunately, I live in 'safe suburbia', where there's rarely any intense traffic... and on the occasions where the roads are congested, most people wait patiently in line. My office is only 6-7 miles from my home, so it's an easy ride.

It probably helps that I ride that bike like an 'old man' (hey, wait a minute... I AM an old man!). No extreme acceleration, no wild stunts, always careful.... which may be the reason why I've never dumped the bike, never experienced any road rash, etc. I was just thinking, last night, that although the 750cc V4 in my bike redlines at 10 grand, I doubt I've ever had it over 7000 RPM.

The most amazing thing is that, despite sitting all winter under a cover, and barely used at all since the snow melted, it's running extraordinarily well, starting instantly, idling smoothly. I credit Honda for making a pretty damn good product. In 15 years I've owned it, I only had engine trouble once, a couple of years back.... the 'repair' was basically a carburetor rebuild (well, four of them, in my bike), and although it was expensive, when considered against 15 years of ownership, it wasn't unreasonable.

jack grebe
07-07-2016, 12:42 PM
Forget yrs...... How expensive were those carbs when compared to miles?

I had my Yamaha Roadliner for 5 1/2 years, I put 81 k of the 88k it had on it.
Nothing more than brakes, tires, general maintenance......oh and the only
repair was a starter solenoid.

Damn I miss that bike.

Norman Bernstein
07-07-2016, 12:50 PM
Forget yrs...... How expensive were those carbs when compared to miles?

Well, I never put on those kind of miles. I did three or four trips down to NJ and back (500mi round trip), and fairly often rode the bike down to my boat (96mi round trip), but aside from that, the remainder of my riding has been local short trips of 15-20 mi or less. I've gone through two front tires... but I'm still on the original rear tire (probably close to the point where it should be replaced). The bike only has about 18K miles on it, so I'm obviously NOT that big of a long distance rider.

After my carb trouble, I started using Sta-bil in the fuel tank with every fill-up... and noticed that the Honda dealer recommends using a fuel stabilizer in every tank of fuel, as well. Maybe that's why the bike is running so well these days.

mmd
07-07-2016, 12:59 PM
Yep, long storage periods punctuated by infrequent short-haul trips is a recipe for gummed-up carbs. Keep a spray can of carb cleaner in your garage and every once in a while remove the air cleaner and spray a shot into each carb throat in turn when the engine is running and warm until the cylinder begins to lag and stumble, then when done all carbs rev the engine a few times before shutting down. Keeps the carb internals clean and moving freely.

http://www.gunk.com/products/product_images/MD_M4814.jpg

George Jung
07-07-2016, 01:01 PM
I haven't ridden my old Sabre for several years - but it still runs well. Did a carb rebuild several years back, after neglecting it for too long. The traffic here is inconsistent with safe biking - too many folk not up to the task of paying attention to driving. I do miss riding/ opening it up a bit, as in the 'old days' - nothing quite so nice as running near redline and shifting through the gears, esp on a winding road. Good times!

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
07-07-2016, 01:05 PM
Do this outdoors.

Fire and chlorinated solvents can be an amusing way to interesting lung trouble.

jack grebe
07-07-2016, 01:23 PM
After my carb trouble, I started using Sta-bil in the fuel tank with every fill-up... and noticed that the Honda dealer recommends using a fuel stabilizer in every tank of fuel, as well. Maybe that's why the bike is running so well these days.
Forget sta bil


I am only going to post this once

1 part Lucas injector cleaner.......I don't care if you have a carburetor

2 parts Marvel Mystery oil


Lucas ethanol treatment to make the mixture a 1 oz per gallon treatment.



I use this in everything.......EVERYTHING I own that uses gas!!!!!!!!!


Including lawn equipment, cars, trucks, tractors, 2 cycle , etc........
Never a problem, regardless of how long a sit.

Norman Bernstein
07-07-2016, 01:29 PM
Forget sta bil


I am only going to post this once

1 part Lucas injector cleaner.......I don't care if you have a carburetor

2 parts Marvel Mystery oil


Lucas ethanol treatment to make the mixture a 1 oz per gallon treatment.



I use this in everything.......EVERYTHING I own that uses gas!!!!!!!!!


Including lawn equipment, cars, trucks, tractors, 2 cycle , etc........
Never a problem, regardless of how long a sit.

I am sure it's great.... but the Sta-bil seems to work just fine, and is a great deal less trouble.

jack grebe
07-07-2016, 01:31 PM
StaI bil will stop Phase separation.......but does nothing for damage caused by ethanol.

I have an old bike that was left sit without........it has pin holes eaten into the floats by ethanol........

When ever possible, get ethanol free gas.

jack grebe
07-07-2016, 01:34 PM
I am sure it's great.... but the Sta-bil seems to work just fine, and is a great deal less trouble.

Time WILL tell

George Jung
07-07-2016, 01:47 PM
I run premium. Interesting additive, Jack. What's your thoughts on 'Seafoam'?

jack grebe
07-07-2016, 01:54 PM
I run premium. Interesting additive, Jack. What's your thoughts on 'Seafoam'?

Premium still has up to 10% ethanol...........that is what causes the damage.

Sea foam can clear varnish, but again, does nothing to prevent.

jack grebe
07-07-2016, 01:58 PM
Since my accident, and my new bike, ethanol free gas was available for a complete round trip from Central Florida to south east Pennsylvania.......Google it, use it......

George Jung
07-07-2016, 02:02 PM
You are a font of info! I'll have to check - I thought the pump said 'ethanol free' on the premium. I've kept your recipe, and forwarded to my SIL, the motorhead. Thanks.

Norman Bernstein
07-07-2016, 02:27 PM
You are a font of info! I'll have to check - I thought the pump said 'ethanol free' on the premium. I've kept your recipe, and forwarded to my SIL, the motorhead. Thanks.

Considering that Honda recommends Sta-bil, I'm guessing that their warranty expense wouldn't incline them to recommend something that didn't work. I think I'd want to know who invented that 'recipe', and why it's superior to anything else. I'm quite skeptical of home-brew remedies for things, unless there's some demonstrated proof that isn't merely anecdotal, or hasn't been tested scientifically. If it works for you, Jack, that's great... but YOU aren't going to have to assume MY liabilities, if it doesn't.... only your own :)

George Jung
07-07-2016, 02:47 PM
My bike is so old, it doesn't even know what 'warranty' means! :arg

cathouse willy
07-07-2016, 09:30 PM
I'm just a bit envious of you riders, I just sold my sidecar outfit on tuesday so now my hobby account is flush with cash. After 50 years of riding I'm hanging it up.To ease the pain I'm shopping for some toys for new hobbies, A motorized turntable for my model railroad and a new snooker cue. Nothing like a little shopping to make you feel better.

epoxyboy
07-08-2016, 01:34 AM
Well, I never put on those kind of miles. I did three or four trips down to NJ and back (500mi round trip), and fairly often rode the bike down to my boat (96mi round trip), but aside from that, the remainder of my riding has been local short trips of 15-20 mi or less. I've gone through two front tires... but I'm still on the original rear tire (probably close to the point where it should be replaced). The bike only has about 18K miles on it, so I'm obviously NOT that big of a long distance rider.

After my carb trouble, I started using Sta-bil in the fuel tank with every fill-up... and noticed that the Honda dealer recommends using a fuel stabilizer in every tank of fuel, as well. Maybe that's why the bike is running so well these days.
Your fifteen year old rear tyre should have been replaced about ten years ago! Just like people, they get old, hard and inflexible.

Pete

The Bigfella
07-08-2016, 02:44 AM
Your fifteen year old rear tyre should have been replaced about ten years ago! Just like people, they get old, hard and inflexible.

Pete

... and incredibly dangerous. A ten year old mate of my son's was killed when an old rear tyre on a bike exploded.

jack grebe
07-08-2016, 06:35 AM
I've had 2 rear tires pop on me at highway speeds, it's an adventure.

The Bigfella
07-08-2016, 06:49 AM
I've had 2 rear tires pop on me at highway speeds, it's an adventure.

Borrowed (old) bike... 110 kph... gibber plain... BANG. Get's interesting, eh? Have turned into a corner at similar speed on the tar and discovered that the front didn't have any air in it. Woo hoo....

"Best" old tyre incident was a track tyre that threw it's tread, front left wheel... at 170 kph. Did some damage that one... inner guard, bumper.

StevenBauer
07-08-2016, 08:34 AM
Trevor just got his first ride of the season last week:

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/bauerdad/2016/6915d9c9a326352c86d772707e6b2901_zps5hpf5rl6.jpg

Ted Hoppe
07-08-2016, 09:04 AM
^ I love Trevor's smile.

jack grebe
07-08-2016, 09:31 AM
^ I love Trevor's smile.

I love the side car

The Bigfella
07-08-2016, 09:51 AM
Did Trevor get hungry and chew a chunk out of the windscreen?

Lew Barrett
07-08-2016, 10:56 AM
Summer riding in the southeast is difficult. It's impossible to bring myself to suit up in this climate. I do have fresh tires though. :)

George Jung
07-08-2016, 11:00 AM
Yeah. A blowout on a car is bad enough.... not sure how you'd keep a bike up or under any semblance of control.

StevenBauer
07-08-2016, 01:39 PM
Did Trevor get hungry and chew a chunk out of the windscreen?

Actually he just got a little careless installing the sidecar. He was rushing a little and dropped the bike on the 'car. I chastised him soundly and decided to mount the taller windscreen that came with the 'car. I think he just wanted the bigger windscreen all along. I probably won't get to mount the screen until we get back from France. Lots to do in the next few days.

Syed
07-08-2016, 09:36 PM
Your fifteen year old rear tyre should have been replaced about ten years ago! Just like people, they get old, hard and inflexible.

Pete
What about a spare car tyre, never used for 6/7 years?

The Bigfella
07-08-2016, 10:15 PM
What about a spare car tyre, never used for 6/7 years?

Car manufacturers say replace it. Here's a quick run through

http://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/Documents/2014_Tire_Safety_SYM_Panel_4b_Kane.pdf

John B
07-09-2016, 12:20 AM
I've been out on my quadbike today myself. Scared a dude on a Harley with the noise but......

jack grebe
07-09-2016, 09:16 AM
What about a spare car tyre, never used for 6/7 years?

Replace it. Here in the U.S., tires have a date of manufacturing on them. Car tires
have a 7 year shelf life. I am not sure about the solid rubber donut tires.

Gerarddm
07-09-2016, 09:24 AM
Well kudos to you who still ride. The thrill is gone for me, I sold my last bike six years ago.

Norman Bernstein
07-09-2016, 10:07 AM
Well kudos to you who still ride. The thrill is gone for me, I sold my last bike six years ago.

Since I've developed some lower back pain this past year, I'm not sure how much longer I'll be riding, too. I was never an iron-butt, anyhow... more of a sporadic local pleasure rider. I used to commute to my office with it, daily, but nowadays it seems like either my lower back hurts, or I have to carry something that won't fit on the luggage rack.

The Bigfella
07-09-2016, 03:11 PM
Since I've developed some lower back pain this past year, I'm not sure how much longer I'll be riding, too. I was never an iron-butt, anyhow... more of a sporadic local pleasure rider. I used to commute to my office with it, daily, but nowadays it seems like either my lower back hurts, or I have to carry something that won't fit on the luggage rack.

Have you tried wearing a kidney belt whilst riding?

Wouldn't fit on the luggage rack? You sure?

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff112/igatenby/Last%20Java%20and%20Sumatra/038-3.jpg (http://s240.photobucket.com/user/igatenby/media/Last%20Java%20and%20Sumatra/038-3.jpg.html)

Lew Barrett
07-09-2016, 03:51 PM
Yeah. A blowout on a car is bad enough.... not sure how you'd keep a bike up or under any semblance of control.

They wiggle when the air is let out. How much depends on several factors but it it's a puncture you usually get a warning. Best to heed it.
At speed it can be interesting but blowouts are rare unless you are really negligent. I've never had one, riding since 1964.

Norman Bernstein
07-09-2016, 03:58 PM
Have you tried wearing a kidney belt whilst riding?


Lately, even walking is painful, for the first hour or two that I awake.... for some reason, the pain goes away after I've been up for a few hours. It seems to be associated with sleep, but it's not affected by the mattress, since it's the same at home, as it is on the boat, where the mattresses have very different firmness.

I don't know if it's just muscular, or spinal. My annual physical is in a few weeks, and I plan to pursue it with my doctor. My web research all says that most lower back pain is temporary and will resolve itself within a few weeks, but it's been months that I've had the problem, so something must be wrong.

The Bigfella
07-09-2016, 06:05 PM
Lately, even walking is painful, for the first hour or two that I awake.... for some reason, the pain goes away after I've been up for a few hours. It seems to be associated with sleep, but it's not affected by the mattress, since it's the same at home, as it is on the boat, where the mattresses have very different firmness.

I don't know if it's just muscular, or spinal. My annual physical is in a few weeks, and I plan to pursue it with my doctor. My web research all says that most lower back pain is temporary and will resolve itself within a few weeks, but it's been months that I've had the problem, so something must be wrong.

Good luck with it. I hurt my back a dozen or so years back, had some occupational therapy that ended with me being shown a particular stretch that works really well for me. Best thing for me is that stretch and keeping the weight off.



They wiggle when the air is let out. How much depends on several factors but it it's a puncture you usually get a warning. Best to heed it.
At speed it can be interesting but blowouts are rare unless you are really negligent. I've never had one, riding since 1964.

Yeah... negligence here... Scrapheap Challenge. I blew my bike up out in the far west of the state... hid it under a bush and continued in the support vehicle. The rally organiser is a double amputee and he was finding the rough stuff a bit much... so he handed over his ride, which had been given to him at the last minute when his scrapper (a much modified Honda 400/4) split a fuel tank at the start of the rally.

This delightful machine is, I believe, a mid 80's Kawasaki KLE 600... the grandfather of the KLRs of today

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff112/igatenby/Third/camcorn1.jpg (http://s240.photobucket.com/user/igatenby/media/Third/camcorn1.jpg.html)

The rear tube had split just before this photo was taken, whilst, as mentioned, I was doing 110 kph. Clearly, old rubber - possibly decades old, but who'd know? The bike had been bought off ebay for under $245 with a "gearbox faulty" note. The gearlever was bent against the cases. Fixed by levering it out.

No warning... just "bang"... instant zero air in the tyre. A wiggle is correct. A very big, very violent wiggle.... with the bike all over the place. I can think of other words than wiggle... but let's stick with that.

I note that my tyre repair technique has changed somewhat over the past 5 years. That was 2011. Fast forward to now... and any bike without a centrestand simply gets laid on its side to remove a wheel. No more of this searching around for rocks and logs and crap to hold the bike up. I'm averaging one of these events (mostly, but not always, less dramatic) about every five moths.

This one was really a triple, btw

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff112/igatenby/Last%20Java%20and%20Sumatra/017-12.jpg (http://s240.photobucket.com/user/igatenby/media/Last%20Java%20and%20Sumatra/017-12.jpg.html)

Pushed the bike a fair way until I found the rock (it uses so much less energy to just lay it down and do the work)... a local "helped" me. Took the tyre off again to retrieve the tyre lever my friendly helper had left inside the tyre.... and then pumped up the slow leak several times between there and a truck stop tyre service to fix the tube that he'd pinched.

Most recent one was at home, btw... last month. Heard the developing flat before feeling it. Fixed it in the back yard. Best tip for anyone doing a tyre change.... use your knees. Keep the tyre down in the well by kneeling on it.

Lew Barrett
07-10-2016, 08:58 AM
My back (and knees, which need serious work) are lousy, but I find riding actually can loosen my back depending on which machine I ride. For that, I find lower bars and a modest stretch across the tank are actually more beneficial than riding an upright bike. Cruiser egos are hardest on the back and butt in my experience and that's generally echoed in the MC press as well. Feet forward machines give the least support for the upper body.