PDA

View Full Version : fun day at work



JTA
06-16-2016, 10:51 AM
Documenting the move of a Saturn First Stage from Michoud Assembly Facility to INFINITY Science Center.
Underway!

http://i.imgur.com/onhfMKs.jpg?1

ron ll
06-16-2016, 10:54 AM
VERY cool. Old and new forms of transportation in one shot.

JTA
06-16-2016, 11:08 AM
Had Apollo 19 not been scrubbed, this stage would have powered them.

"The S-IC (pronounced "ess one see") was the first stage of the American Saturn V rocket. The S-IC stage was built by the Boeing Company. Like the first stages of most rockets, most of its mass of more than 2,000 tonnes at launch was propellant, in this case RP-1 rocket fuel and liquid oxygen (LOX) oxidizer. It was 42 meters tall and 10 meters in diameter, and provided 33,000 kN of thrust to get the rocket through the first 61 kilometers of ascent. The stage had five F-1 engines in a quincunx arrangement. The center engine was fixed in position, while the four outer engines could be hydraulically gimballed to control the rocket."

The Bigfella
06-16-2016, 02:50 PM
With power like that, who needs the tugs?

Paul Pless
06-16-2016, 03:01 PM
This Saturn rocket is at the rest stop at the state line between Alabama and Tennessee. They only put the fence around it recently, you used to be able to walk right under it. I have passed it hundreds of times. Last time I stopped was just a month ago, sad to see that it was covered with mildew and green algae-like slime.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/c2/f1/c9/c2f1c9a2d528a334991e1cbac1030768.jpg

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/7d/12/66/7d1266235d818538702d25ff1ac7ef66.jpg

BrianW
06-16-2016, 10:46 PM
Neat stuff!

Thanks for the post!

Paul Girouard
06-16-2016, 11:16 PM
Those where one hell of a rocket. In talking with Bill Anders he said it was the loudest thing he's ever flown in.

A few weeks ago there was a thread about something , and some how NASA came up , I may have been the one who brough it up , I do know I made a statement that NASA doesn't have the "will" to pull off mission's like the Apollo program.
And the back ground to that was basically just repeating what Bill Anders , Jim Lovel and Frank Boremen said at the reunion gathering here in Washington last month.

I'm just about done remodeling Bill's house, so I've had some unique opportunities to talk one and one with Bill about many things. But to a man they ALL said NASA is broken , it's a blame game / PC agency that at this time isn't up to the things that where done in the late 60's and 70's.

He told me be thankful for Gravity next time you hear your turd hit the water, he said in space taking a dump is "complicated"! Or was in 1968!
Amazing guy Major General Anders! Pretty happy I got to work on his house and become a friend of his!

Paul Pless
06-17-2016, 05:36 AM
That's pretty cool Paul. Still, it was Congress that broke NASA. . .

Figment
06-17-2016, 07:30 AM
What was the book about the oil tanker rescuing the tugboat that was bringing a barge of NASA rocket sections around to CC?
Biggest salvage-award in history IIRC?

Paul Pless
06-17-2016, 07:34 AM
https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/photo.goodreads.com/books/1328852770i/480255._UY470_SS470_.jpg

JTA
06-17-2016, 11:10 AM
...I made a statement that NASA doesn't have the "will" to pull off mission's like the Apollo program. ... But to a man they ALL said NASA is broken , it's a blame game / PC agency that at this time isn't up to the things that where done in the late 60's and 70's.

NASA's mission and focus gets changed with every new Administration. It takes years, years, to build out a program. It is extremely difficult to invest in a long range plan when the plan has major changes every 4-8 years.
I would question the statement about having the "will" to pull off missions like Apollo. The "will" I think is there, but we are now so risk averse that those missions would be impossible today. No one is willing to say "Hey this **** is dangerous, people may die, equipment may be lost"

Paul Girouard
06-17-2016, 02:00 PM
NASA's mission and focus gets changed with every new Administration. It takes years, years, to build out a program. It is extremely difficult to invest in a long range plan when the plan has major changes every 4-8 years.
I would question the statement about having the "will" to pull off missions like Apollo. The "will" I think is there, but we are now so risk averse that those missions would be impossible today. No one is willing to say "Hey this **** is dangerous, people may die, equipment may be lost"

That is what that old breed of astronaut's called "will" or that generation of American if you will, Valerie , Bill's wife also said well my husband is a pilot and now astronaut , it's what he does, the rewards to them out weighted the risks.
Bill himself said Apollo 8 was 1/3 chance we'll make it , the mission will be a success , 1/3 chance we'll go , have problems but make it back alive , 1/3 chance we'll be killed attempting to complete the mission. A risk he was willing to take.
Boremen said "it was a good ship , of course made by the lowest bidder (that got a good laugh) , but if I didn't think the ship was up to the mission I wouldn't have gone!" Lovell didn't throw in any definitive answer that I recall, but he did go on more Apollo mission than any other astronaut IIRC, and he was the mission commander to Apollo 13.

CWSmith
06-17-2016, 02:04 PM
I wish I were having a fun day at work.

I wasted an hour today trying to file paperwork that lacked the necessary explanation only to learn (finally), "Oh, just make something up. That's not important." All the while I'm being told, "This must be done or the program stops!"

Bureaucracy is the where the incompetent come to rest when they have failed at everything else.