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PeterSibley
06-06-2016, 05:24 PM
A long time ago,when I was 24 years old I was working for a used car yard, driving vehicles from yard to yard and doing general gofer work. It wasn't a bad job really, pleasant people to work with and a decent wage. Amongst those pleasant people was an older bloke, probably in his late 50s..... the centre of this story.


Then came a flood and this flood was a beauty ! 1974 in Brisbane ….Google will supply photos for those interested. The yard I was working in went under 10 feet of flood water and stayed under for a week. When the water dropped the clean up began, pulling everything possible out of cars ,hosing it off, drying carpets and upholstery. The mechanics getting engines running. It was a BIG job.


About 2 weeks after the flood the yard was selling again, the drowned expensive cars had been sent to other yards interstate and dry cars sent to replace them. The cheapies remained, dried out but suspect.


One day a young bloke about my age walked in and looked a Ford Cortina, a 4 cylinder car. The friendly old salesman I mentioned above wandered overand chatted to him then went off to write up the transfer.


I walked over and said, “You do realise this car's been under the flood don't you?”
To which he responded,''No, he said it hasn't been”.
I opened the car's door , reached up under the dashboard and pulled out a handful of wet mud and said ,''It has,'' and offered the mud as proof.


The young bloke looked at me, shook his head and went off to sign the transfer.


My question is what did the old salesman say to the buyer in those 10 minutes they had together to make the young bloke deny the existence of that handful of mud ?


42 years later I remain gobsmacked.

PeterSibley
06-06-2016, 05:47 PM
Are there any really good salesmen here who could enlighten me ?

PeterSibley
06-06-2016, 05:58 PM
$1500.

PeterSibley
06-06-2016, 06:06 PM
The Oz $ was 70c US then..... as now.

PeterSibley
06-06-2016, 08:27 PM
I see people are a little less amazed than I am that a salesman's 10 minute conversation could cause a perfectly normal young man to deny the existence of a handful of mud .:confused:

The Bigfella
06-06-2016, 09:04 PM
I see people are a little less amazed than I am that a salesman's 10 minute conversation could cause a perfectly normal young man to deny the existence of a handful of mud .:confused:

He didn't deny it, it simply wasn't his over-riding concern. I know how difficult you find it to understand that not everyone sees things with the clarity of yourself, but that's life. That's why only one in ten voters votes the way you do. Perhaps the other 90% are the ones who are right, not you?

Ian McColgin
06-06-2016, 09:23 PM
As the story was relayed, the young customer did not overtly deny that the salesman had lied about the car having been underwater but he acted on the saleman's pitch which included, according the the young customer, the claim that the car had not been underwater.

If the story contains all the facts, then we cannot tell for certain whether the young customer knew the saleman was lying and did not care or whether he believed the salesman. Whichever it was, the young man was at the minimum unconcerned with what to others would be a key fact.

The Bigfella
06-06-2016, 09:37 PM
Are there any really good salesmen here who could enlighten me ?

I have, a long time in the past, conducted some sales training. At the time, I was working for an American - Australian joint venture and we used the American material. The parent company dated back to the civil war days and had been formed to produce corks for medical supplies for the war effort. It was the Armstrong Cork Company. They used their initials in the sales training material. A.C.C.

The sales process was based around Ask, Choose, Concentrate. Ask the buyer what interests them, what they want, what their budget is, etc... then choose the most appropriate product offering, then concentrate the presentation on the chosen product.

I suspect your salesman followed some sort of similar process.

For all we know, that customer may have been buying back his parents old car that he was conceived in... and the mud didn't matter.

Gerarddm
06-06-2016, 09:43 PM
Supposedly one time a slick car salesperson sold a car to a deaf guy, and his boss was surprised to see in the paperwork an expensive radio approved on the options list. The manager asked his salesman, how did you get a deaf guy to option out a radio? The salesman smiled and said I told him his dog needed it so he wouldn't get bored riding with him.

Breakaway
06-06-2016, 10:15 PM
Many people, in the " heat of the moment," are a lot less concerned with facts than others think they should be. Or, rather, they are concerned with different facts.

Advice: " Don't sell the steak. Sell the sizzle!"

Kevin

Sent from my iPhone using Forum Runner

Phil Y
06-06-2016, 11:21 PM
Young lad, Ford Cortina, probably for a price he could afford, and a bit less than the pre flood market price. There's no way he's going to accept any facts that might get between him and the wheel of that car. That mud could have come from anywhere after all.

lupussonic
06-06-2016, 11:54 PM
Advice: " Don't sell the steak. Sell the sizzle!"

Kevin



I'm liking that...!

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 01:18 AM
Young lad, Ford Cortina, probably for a price he could afford, and a bit less than the pre flood market price. There's no way he's going to accept any facts that might get between him and the wheel of that car. That mud could have come from anywhere after all.

Indeed , from under the dashboard were you always find a handful of sloppy mud. The thing that amazed me at the time was the buyer refusing to acknowledge the overwhelming implication..... that old salesman was a liar and that the car had definitely been under the flood.

The Bigfella
06-07-2016, 02:45 AM
Indeed , from under the dashboard were you always find a handful of sloppy mud. The thing that amazed me at the time was the buyer refusing to acknowledge the overwhelming implication..... that old salesman was a liar and that the car had definitely been under the flood.

The more likely explanation is that he accepted the salesman over you.

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 02:51 AM
The more likely explanation is that he accepted the salesman over the mud.

ftfy.

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 02:53 AM
My bet is that if he immigrated to the USA this year he'll be voting for the Donald.

The Bigfella
06-07-2016, 03:35 AM
ftfy.

... and there's your lack of morality and ethics on display.

You are prepared to modify someone's words and pretend that they are that individual's words.

That's dangerous territory and a low act.

What I wrote was:


The more likely explanation is that he accepted the salesman over you.

for you to claim that I said this:


The more likely explanation is that he accepted the salesman over the mud.

I expect, if you have anything but the lowest of ethics, that you'll apologise.

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 03:37 AM
Poor darling . I notified you , that's what fify means, get over it.....have another ale.

The Bigfella
06-07-2016, 03:40 AM
Poor darling . I notified you , get over it.....have another ale.

It's your lack of ethics and lack of morality.

BrianW
06-07-2016, 03:42 AM
I'm suspecting that there's a deep underlying moral here, much like a Grimm's fairly tale. Which is all good. :)

Sometimes the unknown used car that's been flooded is preferred to the known piece of crap that has not. ;)

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 03:46 AM
I'd have it for spare parts for one from a yard on a hill.

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 03:46 AM
It's your lack of ethics and lack of morality.

You have my sympathy dear.

epoxyboy
06-07-2016, 05:15 AM
Young lad, Ford Cortina, probably for a price he could afford, and a bit less than the pre flood market price. There's no way he's going to accept any facts that might get between him and the wheel of that car. That mud could have come from anywhere after all.
Anybody would think you were a young bloke once, with a singleminded hankering to get a set of wheels under you ;-)
My first car was a '68ish Beetle, really tidy looking, $1200 reciepts for a gearbox rebuild - more than half the asking price.
Like lots of older cars bsck then, it had that slightly funky old damp carpet smell that should have rung alarm bells. In the fullness of time, the first occasion I drove it in the wet, the passenger side footwell got about an inch deep in water. Under the carpet was a thick layer of newspaper. Under the newspaper was a lacework of perforated rusty steel. And then I rolled it, not my fault, bloody VW swing axle suspension.
It became pretty obvious that at some stage, it had most probably been driven into the sea, or flooded. It had a rusty tide line that five minutes of impartial due diligence would have revealed. Thing is, the salesman didn't sell me the car, I'd sold it to myself. My preciousssssss!


Pete

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 05:21 AM
In this case Pete, you may have a very good point but it was still VERY strange.

The Bigfella
06-07-2016, 05:25 AM
Anybody would think you were a young bloke once, with a singleminded hankering to get a set of wheels under you ;-)
My first car was a '68ish Beetle, really tidy looking, $1200 reciepts for a gearbox rebuild - more than half the asking price.
Like lots of older cars bsck then, it had that slightly funky old damp carpet smell that should have rung alarm bells. In the fullness of time, the first occasion I drove it in the wet, the passenger side footwell got about an inch deep in water. Under the carpet was a thick layer of newspaper. Under the newspaper was a lacework of perforated rusty steel. And then I rolled it, not my fault, bloody VW swing axle suspension.
It became pretty obvious that at some stage, it had most probably been driven into the sea, or flooded. It had a rusty tide line that five minutes of impartial due diligence would have revealed. Thing is, the salesman didn't sell me the car, I'd sold it to myself. My preciousssssss!


Pete


Ahem.... you backed off in a corner, didn't you?

WX
06-07-2016, 05:44 AM
ftfy.
Careful Peter, Ian mashed the button on me for doing that.

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 05:51 AM
Really ? It seems normal practice on this board .

My correction of Ian's post reflected the truth of the situation, the bloke literally denied the handful of mud I grabbed from beneath the dashboard while he watched . I'd say I am the one wronged here. Ian was twisting the story.

WX
06-07-2016, 06:04 AM
Really ? It seems normal practice on this board .

My correction of Ian's post reflected the truth of the situation, the bloke literally denied the handful of mud I grabbed from beneath the dashboard while he watched . I'd say I am the one wronged here. Ian was twisting the story.
Yep. It's why I have him on ignore.

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 06:05 AM
A good idea.

epoxyboy
06-07-2016, 06:10 AM
Ahem.... you backed off in a corner, didn't you?
Maybe :rolleyes:
Twas a twisty gravel road, going downhill, and I was makin' like one of those 1980's rally drivers fron Finland - Maakinen or something. Until I scared myself s**tless that is, backed off mid bend and made things far worse. At that point, life became a lottery - would I fishtail off the downhill side of the road, smack into the bank on the uphill side, or by some small miracle, recover. Fortunately, I went up the bank, rolled over, and slid back down onto the road.
Mother was not impressed - I had owned the car two days at that point. From then on, all off road exploits involved mashing the pedal to the metal on bends, unleashing all forty horses (count em) to squat the rear end.

Pete

Hwyl
06-07-2016, 06:11 AM
Yep. It's why I have him on ignore.


A good idea.

I was going to suggest it.

Hwyl
06-07-2016, 06:13 AM
A to the salesman, some people just have the gift/curse.

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 06:13 AM
Now that improved things markedly!

PeterSibley
06-07-2016, 06:15 AM
A to the salesman, some people just have the gift/curse.

Yes, that guy got into the young bloke's head so deeply he couldn't accept the reality that the salesman had lied ...... denying the mud was easier.

carioca1232001
06-07-2016, 06:27 AM
Yes, that guy got into the young bloke's head so deeply he couldn't accept the reality that the salesman had lied ...... denying the mud was easier.

Young people usually gloss over hard facts and do what pleases them most.

What comes to mind is when a young fellow - or young lady - gets infatuated with another person and is unable to see the forest for the trees.

Should the parents or relatives intervene, there is greater likelihood that they will see their dream to completion, for good or for bad, time permitting.

Hwyl
06-07-2016, 06:30 AM
In a low point in my life I had a telephone sales job, never mind the product.
I'd spent 10 minute on the phone trying to explain the honesty of the company, my colleague sitting next to me, sensing my frustration, took the phone from me and simply said "it's legit" handed the phone back an I made the salee.