PDA

View Full Version : Amistad



Paul Pless
06-06-2016, 06:19 AM
following a theme

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f7/La_Amistad_%28ship%29_restored.jpg

CWSmith
06-06-2016, 12:18 PM
I remember reading years ago how the Baltimore Clipper was often used by smugglers to carry expensive and illegal cargo. That often meant slaves after the importation of slaves was made illegal.

One need only glance at that boat to recognize the truth in that statement.

Hwyl
06-06-2016, 12:28 PM
I think the movie is Anthony Hopkins' best. I was disappointed with the on board scenes.

bamamick
06-06-2016, 07:03 PM
Gareth, did you mean 'Bounty'? I enjoyed that one, as well. I also liked 'Amistad'. Got to see her being built in Mystic.

Mickey Lake

S.V. Airlie
06-06-2016, 07:12 PM
I think the movie is Anthony Hopkins' best. I was disappointed with the on board scenes.I'm biased. My direct ancestor got the slaves off.

bamamick
06-06-2016, 09:23 PM
My apologies for confusing matters. I now recall Mr. Hopkins portrayal of JQA.

Mickey Lake

Phillip Allen
06-07-2016, 07:09 AM
I once saw a small sail boat named Amistad... I was amazed

Paul Pless
06-07-2016, 07:13 AM
http://mansupra.com/amistadamerica/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/005-aai-Amistad-06-underfullsail-skyscrapersskylineChicago.jpg

S.V. Airlie
06-07-2016, 07:13 AM
My apologies for confusing matters. I now recall Mr. Hopkins portrayal of JQA.

Mickey Lake
Mickey, not being good on actors, I really don't know who played JQA. Also dressed as an 80 yr old in period costume.:(

moTthediesel
06-07-2016, 07:18 AM
The lake:

https://www.goodsports.com/guide/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/21.jpg

Dave Hadfield
06-07-2016, 07:33 AM
She is going to have to wait for a land breeze to get off that anchor. And why is the topsail backed? Have they just now run her in shore to get away from the frigate?

And why isn't that frigate firing upon the not-yet-loaded slaver? And why have stunsails run out if action is near?

Hornblower would anchor the frigate within range, use a spring line to bring her broadside on target, demand surrender, and send in the launch plus whatever other boats, with the Marines, and swivel guns in the bows.

The Amistad crew would almost certainly take to the beach.

Capture the schooner, then use her as a trick/Q-ship to capture more.

S.V. Airlie
06-07-2016, 07:37 AM
Dave, I'm going to take a shot at this, could be wrong;

The Armistaad was a Spanish slaver. Spain still allows slaving.

The UK abolished slavery true but, it may be an act of war if an English Frigate forcibly took over the Armistaad.

Again, could be wrong here.

Dave Hadfield
06-08-2016, 08:47 PM
Sure, maybe, but the schooner has run suspiciously close to shore, and her afterguard do not look calm.

Canoeyawl
06-08-2016, 11:11 PM
Sure, maybe, but the schooner has run suspiciously close to shore, and her afterguard do not look calm.

I love Forester...

Gerarddm
06-08-2016, 11:19 PM
Reminds me of that Aubrey/Maturin book where they do an anti-slavery patrol and shoot up a slaver in sight of the slaver's town. Sorta like how Daenerys took the slave cities in Essos. ;-)

Paul Pless
06-09-2016, 06:15 AM
She is going to have to wait for a land breeze to get off that anchor. And why is the topsail backed? Have they just now run her in shore to get away from the frigate?

And why isn't that frigate firing upon the not-yet-loaded slaver? And why have stunsails run out if action is near?

Hornblower would anchor the frigate within range, use a spring line to bring her broadside on target, demand surrender, and send in the launch plus whatever other boats, with the Marines, and swivel guns in the bows.

The Amistad crew would almost certainly take to the beach.

Capture the schooner, then use her as a trick/Q-ship to capture more.


from wiki, the 'ship' in the background of the painting is actually United States Revenue Cutter Washington.


In 1839 Amistad left Havana for Puerto Principe, Cuba (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Principe,_Cuba), a smaller port near the sugar plantation where the slaves were to be delivered. The ship carried 53 Mende (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mende_people) captives (49 adults and 4 children), who had been captured from Sierra Leone (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_Leone) to be sold into slavery in Cuba.[3] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Amistad#cite_note-WDL-3) On July 2, Sengbe Pieh (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Cinqu%C3%A9) (later known in the United States as Joseph Cinqué) led the captives in a revolt against the mostly Spanish crew on the ship.
The Mende had been transported to Havana aboard the slave ship Tecora. These captives were being taken along the coast to a smaller port closer to a sugar plantation. In the main hold below decks, the captives found a rusty file and sawed through their manacles. Once free, the men quickly went up on deck and, armed with machete-like cane knives (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cane_knife),[4] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Amistad#cite_note-4) attacked the crew, successfully gaining control of the ship. They killed the captain and some of the crew, but spared the navigator so he could guide them back to Africa.[3] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Amistad#cite_note-WDL-3) While they demanded to be returned home, the navigator Don Pedro Montez deceived the Mende about the course, maneuvering the ship north along the North American coast. They reached the eastern tip of Long Island (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Island), New York. Discovered by the revenue cutter (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revenue_cutter) USRC Washington, La Amistad was taken into United States custody. The Mende were interned at New Haven, Connecticut (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Haven,_Connecticut), while the courts settled their legal status and conflicting international claims regarding La Amistad's ownership, as well as the status of its property, including the slaves.[3] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Amistad#cite_note-WDL-3)