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View Full Version : A couple of questions for Bernie supporters



John Smith
06-05-2016, 11:31 AM
I saw an interview with Danny Glover this morning. He supports a contested convention based on polls showing 64% of Bernie voters under age 29 supporting it. That would make it reasonable to assume the majority of Democratic voters do not want a contested convention.

I also saw a clip of Sanders himself affirming he will do all he can to prevent Trump from winning in Nov., but he did NOT commit to asking his supporters to vote for Hillary is she's the nominee.

As supporters of Sanders, do you support the superdelegates taking the nomination from the candidate with the most votes and most pledged delegates and giving it to the one with the fewest of both?

Once Hillary IS the official nominee of the party, what do you expect Sanders to do? Will he support her or throw a temper tantrum?

Third question: If you were running the DNC would you be inclined to make any further concession before he releases his tax returns?

S.V. Airlie
06-05-2016, 11:43 AM
Didn't Bernie submit his recent tax returns? I was under the impression he did and the only candidate, using some feeble excuse not to is Trump.

PhaseLockedLoop
06-05-2016, 11:49 AM
...Third question: If you were running the DNC would you be inclined to make any further concession before he releases his tax returns?

Huh?

CWSmith
06-05-2016, 11:50 AM
Sanders has said repeatedly that he will support the Dem nominee. This is an answered question.

Durnik
06-05-2016, 12:05 PM
He supports a contested convention based on polls showing 64% of Bernie voters under age 29 supporting it.

from one of our more soft spoken members on the Brexit thread -

Lastly, independent polls show that a majority of younger folk are in favour of staying in, and I think we 'elders' owe it to them to back an IN vote, since it's their future we are debating, and not our own.

so, since Millenials overwhelming support Bernie, what say you old codgers pretending a chicken hawk in pant suits is a 'change'?

bobby

Ian McColgin
06-05-2016, 12:13 PM
Going to a contested convention is the real route to a unified party. The "super-delegates" are not Clinton robots. They will be looking at the whole party situation - polls, primaries, and the platform debates. If Sanders' supporters are involved in that and if Clinton still wins, there is a higher chance the Sanders lot will then follow Sanders' lead and work for Clinton. Same the other way around with getting the more establishmentarian and conservative Clinton Democrats behind Sanders if that's the way it can go.

Were Sanders to drop out now, leaving his supporters in the lurch, there would be massive disaffection of an important constituency. It's the Republican's wet dream as it's the surest way for the Democrats to lose the election. A contested convention could be a divisive horror but it's the only route to a unified party.

elf
06-05-2016, 12:33 PM
The party's primaries were referenda, largly, on the opinions of voters registered as Democrats. Some of those referenda have been marred by stuff that looks like voter fraud, and many voters who are not willing to commit to a party suspect that the "fraud" has been perpetrated by the Democratic party honchos in their states.

Small and large bits of evidence appear to be mounting up that the party has not treated Mr. Sanders fairly.

This means to me that the vote is suspect because it does not reflect the will of those who tend progressive and are not willing to affiliate with the Democratic party because its figurehead is not adequately addressing their concerns. Those voters, however, are the people whom the figurehead will have to depend on to get elected in November.

There are a lot of disaffected possible voters in that group. Something like 47% of the electorate is not willing to affiliate with a party at this point. Even if half of that group wants to support and will vote for Mr. Trump, that group is the one which will make the difference in the outcome in November. Appearing to exclude that group and then claiming delegates committed by the referenda does not inspire confidence in the figurehead. Tying the hands of superdelegates before the primary season began also does not inspire confidence in the figurehead.

Setting aside the fragmentation of party affiliation made obvious by this primary season, and the need to recognize that neither party is well enough represented by the voters to justify claiming that it has the authority to select the candidates, it seems reasonable to me that the answer to your question 1 is yes.

The answer to your question 2 is Mr. Sanders will accept the will of the convention, more gracefully if his support by the full left-side electorate is firmly recognized by the platform and he can see that his opponent is not just saying stuff to get his voters but actually will pursue the more progressive of his positions. In either case he will accept the will of the convention, however.

The answer to question 3 has been given by others on this thread.

Keith Wilson
06-05-2016, 12:37 PM
Sanders almost certainly won't have enough votes for a contested convention. If there's a serious chance of a large number of superdelegates trying to overturn the will of a majority of primary voters, that would NOT be the way to a unified party. OTOH, if Ms. Clinton is the nominee, I fully expect Mr Sanders to do the right thing and support her wholeheartedly, as he's said he'd do.

Rich Jones
06-05-2016, 02:40 PM
Sanders almost certainly won't have enough votes for a contested convention. If there's a serious chance of a large number of superdelegates trying to overturn the will of a majority of primary voters, that would NOT be the way to a unified party. OTOH, if Ms. Clinton is the nominee, I fully expect Mr Sanders to do the right thing and support her wholeheartedly, as he's said he'd do. But when will he turn his support to Clinton? It should be on Tuesday night when Clinton clinches the nomination, just as Hillary did with Obama in 2008. She didn't wait until the convention to concede defeat. If Bernie insists on throwing a hissy fit at the convention before backing Hillary, I'm going to be mighty upset.