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Jim Bow
06-03-2016, 07:36 PM
Muhammad Ali is in decline. Godspeed the Greatest.

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/muhammad-ali-s-family-gathers-ailing-boxer-s-hospital-bedside-n585611

S.V. Airlie
06-03-2016, 07:40 PM
Sad but, he's had Parkinson's a lot longer than most. I am sorry though.

Norman Bernstein
06-03-2016, 07:51 PM
Very sorry to learn this... and, since my wife has Parkinson's, it hits home more to me, than most.

Breakaway
06-03-2016, 07:52 PM
Man, what a fighter. Lots of great moments, I can still remember watching him come back from " out on his feet" to beat Frazier in the final rounds of the Thrilla in Manilla. "

Kevin

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
06-03-2016, 11:29 PM
One of my Hero's gone at 74.
Floats like a butterfly and stings like a bee.


http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/spring05/shaffer/main_ali.jpg

Gerarddm
06-03-2016, 11:31 PM
Literally in his prime the most famous human on the planet, by far.

Gerarddm
06-03-2016, 11:38 PM
Damn. He's gone.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/livecoverage/breaking-news-now/lc-BBtQrqq?ocid=spartandhp

stumpbumper
06-03-2016, 11:54 PM
The Greatest!!!

PeterSibley
06-04-2016, 12:05 AM
Da man ! RIP. Ali

David G
06-04-2016, 12:16 AM
Here... was a man.

Jim Bow
06-04-2016, 12:31 AM
I remember watching him in the Olympics. We had just taken ownership of a brand new Zenith color television. First color set in the family. Neighbors came over to watch the Olympics.

Quite a heroic figure, certainly no one else stood oit like him.

pipefitter
06-04-2016, 12:39 AM
RIP. Brilliant fighter. I still re-watch his fights on youtube. Ali fights were as big a deal on tv as the Apollo launches, back in the day.

The Bigfella
06-04-2016, 04:30 AM
Asked how he would like to be remembered, he once said: "As a man who never sold out his people. But if that's too much, then just a good boxer. I won't even mind if you don't mention how pretty I was."

Chris Coose
06-04-2016, 05:32 AM
The Greatest of All Time.

jack grebe
06-04-2016, 05:52 AM
He had a training camp not far from where I lived. When ever a fight was coming up, my buddies and I would head up to DEER LAKE to catch a glimpse of him running the fields. One of my friends even ran a few miles with him once.

Bigger than life, but a humble man at heart.

Ian McColgin
06-04-2016, 06:12 AM
The Greatest.

Osborne Russell
06-04-2016, 09:17 AM
A great American, the people's champ.

License revoked, championships revoked, imprisoned. On release, he approaches the microphones, the reporters are already shouting questions. Ignoring them, he reaches out his hand, apparently to people far away, and asks, "Who's the heavyweight champion of the world?" The camera swivels to the show the crowd as they chant, "ALI ! ALI ! ALI !"

Ted Hoppe
06-04-2016, 09:37 AM
We will miss his brilliance. Cunning like Odysseus and strength of Ajax. He was the greatest living legend of our time.

Paul Pless
06-04-2016, 09:38 AM
http://thesource.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/al1-1432032522.jpg

S.V. Airlie
06-04-2016, 09:44 AM
I loved his comment to Howard Cosell, I'm gonna rip off your toupee! or something close. I ran into Howard Cosell with Arthur Ashe one day, and thought the same thing

Lew Barrett
06-04-2016, 09:47 AM
A true profile in courage and an inspiration for generations to follow. What a man. The world is dimmer today,

Syed
06-04-2016, 10:08 AM
I remember his bout in Kinsasha against George Foreman as that was the first time ever a live telecast was aired in Pakistan. If my memory does not fail me, this was his comeback after staying out of ring for quite some time due to certain issues in his country.

David G
06-04-2016, 10:11 AM
I have never been much of a boxing fan, though I boxed for a while as a young teenager. But his fights, I made sure to watch. An artist.

Osborne Russell
06-04-2016, 10:12 AM
And a poet !

Jim Mahan
06-04-2016, 10:24 AM
http://thesource.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/al1-1432032522.jpg

Sonny Liston, right? I remember watching the Gillette sponsored Saturday (Friday?) night fights with my old man. I can almost remember that jingle about the razor blades and being clean cut, looking sharp.

The first thing I remember about Cassius Clay was after a bout, in the papers the next day, his opponent was always beat to hell, with swollen eyes and cuts on his brow, while the champ always looked fresh and unscathed, like he was ready for the prom photos.

jackster
06-04-2016, 08:09 PM
A hero of mine. A man of principles(and humor :))
The punch that was NOT thrown... principal!
http://boxingmemories.com/wp-content/flagallery/rumble-in-the-jungle/ali_foreman_g.jpg
Refusing the draft... principle..
I'll miss him.

Jimmy W
06-04-2016, 11:54 PM
I passed a billboard on my way home today.
A pair of red boxing gloves against a black background with no words.

ron ll
06-05-2016, 09:32 AM
I certainly always liked him, but the more I read his obits the more I realize what a true hero he was. Even when suffering so much from Parkinson's he was still an active diplomat. We didn't get to see much about him in the media in the last couple of decades but he was evidently still doing good things. I guess true heroes don't need media attention.

Chip-skiff
06-06-2016, 12:35 PM
My nephew EJ just posted a snapshot of Ali, who was visiting their home, c. 2000.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-MxZgsT8X7KI/V1WzT4ZOiaI/AAAAAAAAKk8/QJC-I1fARZU-79g-IHdphKccK5nlpLiMACCo/s483/ej%252Bali.jpg

mmd
06-06-2016, 01:03 PM
I remember the vitriol and castigation when he refused to enter military service. He was called all sorts of nasty names. Now he is an American hero, gone too soon.

My, how times change!

Jim Bow
06-06-2016, 01:14 PM
I you can find it, listen to Teri Gross' interview with George Foreman from a couple of years ago. Foreman talks a lot about his brutal upbringing and how dangerous he was becoming. He fully intended to someday kill an opponent. He felt that only then would he get respect.
He said that after he was beaten by Ali, he spent weeks in a state of rage and depression. He said he came out of it when he realized that what he was feeling was genuine human emotion, and he'd never allowed that to happen before.
He said that being beaten by Ali was the best thing that ever happened to him.

isla
06-06-2016, 01:20 PM
The best. Inspirational and a great champion, RIP.

ron ll
06-06-2016, 05:57 PM
Bob Dylan on Ali:

“If the measure of greatness is to gladden the heart of every human being on the face of the earth, then he truly was the greatest. In every way he was the bravest, the kindest and the most excellent of men.”

Osborne Russell
06-06-2016, 06:28 PM
Bob Dylan on Ali:

“If the measure of greatness is to gladden the heart of every human being on the face of the earth, then he truly was the greatest. In every way he was the bravest, the kindest and the most excellent of men.”



Guy's got a way with words.

Robbie 2
06-06-2016, 10:58 PM
RIP Ali..................

lupussonic
06-07-2016, 12:02 AM
This interview is incredible, shot before the Foreman fight. Frost barely gets a word in, you cannot fail to be impressed by his intelligence, energy, humour and dynamism. Pretty strange cosmology though. RIP.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FLjFI8VVag

bobbys
06-10-2016, 06:23 PM
A hero of mine. A man of principles(and humor :))
The punch that was NOT thrown... principal!
http://boxingmemories.com/wp-content/flagallery/rumble-in-the-jungle/ali_foreman_g.jpg
Refusing the draft... principle..
I'll miss him.
.

I liked him but don't buy the principle part.

His career was beating the crap outta people.

he would never have seen combat.

He had a chance to build morale of black servicemen.

His religion was based on getting whitey and hate, hardly a pacifist one..

he enjoyed the fruits of America.

Someone else, prolly a poor person had to go in his pace, Where was that fellows " principles" .

Jimmy W
06-10-2016, 06:29 PM
bobbys proves again that he has no principles.

bobbys
06-10-2016, 06:36 PM
bobbys proves again that he has no principles..

It's just my opinion about that part of his life.

You are free to disagree with words .

I'm sorry I am not bowing and crying and agreeing with him being a draft dodger.

Does not mean I don't think he was a great boxer.

Paul Pless
06-10-2016, 07:07 PM
you were all for the vietnam war? then and now?
.

It's just my opinion about that part of his life.

You are free to disagree with words .

I'm sorry I am not bowing and crying and agreeing with him being a draft dodger.

Does not mean I don't think he was a great boxer.

Osborne Russell
06-10-2016, 07:10 PM
He was the reason why I began paying attention to boxing, as well as the reason I can't watch it anymore.

One of the great mysteries of life, how such a figure could come to be such a figure in such a way. I guess circumstances have a lot to do with it.

David G
06-10-2016, 11:30 PM
He was ahead of his time. A visionary and a wise man. Was it all him? Was it partly his faith? Family?

Paul Girouard
06-10-2016, 11:42 PM
you were all for the vietnam war? then and now?

It was what it was , and it is what it is, you really can't change history. And really seeing it was what it was , and it is what it is, destiny is kind of like that. Just like Obama regime, Bush 1 , Bush 2 , Ike, Lincoln, or Caesar's , Hilter, Alexander the Great, things happen , what we as people have to do with it really is a mystery.

Or Ali for that matter, what would he have been if he where born on 1995?

lupussonic
06-11-2016, 02:47 AM
I heard Ali and his brother went to Indonesia some time after the Foreman fight. His brother was saying that people were living in mud and straw huts, way out away from the cities in the middle of nowhere, and they all came streaming out to welcome him, recognising him instantly. Truly the most famous person on the planet at the time, and the underdogs champion.

Chris Coose
06-11-2016, 05:42 AM
He had a chance to .........

..... go to jail, based on his principles. Principles that floated like a butterfly.
The man changed things that few people had the opportunity to do.
He did far more for the black serviceman that any other African American. But you would be blind to that concept of principles. Clearly.


“Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights? No I’m not going 10,000 miles from home to help murder and burn another poor nation simply to continue the domination of white slave masters of the darker people the world over. This is the day when such evils must come to an end. I have been warned that to take such a stand would cost me millions of dollars. But I have said it once and I will say it again. The real enemy of my people is here. I will not disgrace my religion, my people or myself by becoming a tool to enslave those who are fighting for their own justice, freedom and equality. If I thought the war was going to bring freedom and equality to 22 million of my people they wouldn’t have to draft me, I’d join tomorrow. I have nothing to lose by standing up for my beliefs. So I’ll go to jail, so what? We’ve been in jail for 400 years.”

bobbys
06-11-2016, 10:10 AM
Maybe the guy that went in his place made it, or maybe he died, guess in that case he is not around anymore to be philosophical about it.

John Smith
06-11-2016, 10:30 AM
.

I liked him but don't buy the principle part.

His career was beating the crap outta people.

he would never have seen combat.

He had a chance to build morale of black servicemen.

His religion was based on getting whitey and hate, hardly a pacifist one..

he enjoyed the fruits of America.

Someone else, prolly a poor person had to go in his pace, Where was that fellows " principles" .

There were 4 kinds of young men of draft age back then. Some went because they thought it their duty. Some when because they were afraid not to. Some ran to Canada. Some stood their ground and faced the consequences. Ali faced greater consequences than most. He also won his case in the Supreme Court.

There was also a subdivision. Those who opposed the war and found deferments and those who supported that war but sought deferments.

I sometimes think that if it weren't for those who stood, as Ali did, we might still be in Vietnam.

John Smith
06-11-2016, 10:35 AM
My friend's dad took my friend an me to see the first fight with Liston at the Fabian Theater.

At first we thought Liston was jabbing Clay to death. Then, as they moved around, we realized those jabs didn't quite reach Clay's face. He pulled back each time so they fell just short. Every once if a while he would step forward with a flurry of his own punches.

We knew something was wrong in, I think, round 4, but he survived.

Later, when Liston didn't get off his stool and the fight was over, the camera zoomed in on Liston's face. The entire theater reacted. I don't think anyone realized how much damage Clay had done.

After the second fight, I made a riddle: Name two fighters who beat Sonny Liston in championship fights.

Cassius Clay and Mohammad Ali,,,,,,,,,trick question.

peb
06-11-2016, 10:42 AM
I wonder why the funeral was 7 days after death. Not in keeping with Islamic customs.

Paul Pless
06-11-2016, 10:48 AM
I wonder why the funeral was 7 days after death. Not in keeping with Islamic customs.What is Islamic tradition, other than 'as soon as possible'?

Chris Coose
06-12-2016, 08:08 AM
Maybe the guy that went in his place made it, or maybe he died, guess in that case he is not around anymore to be philosophical about it.

I figured you'd be of that medieval school that taught the meat grinder must be fed. That the machine will take whatever and who ever it wants. And that the warring nation must, it is totally obliged to give up its youth to the madness.
Well those days are ****ing gone not because parents or other adults began to question the validity of the **** mission. It was the kids who were being led to a useless slaughter who said no and that horse ain't going back into the barn.

Osborne Russell
06-12-2016, 03:56 PM
Maybe the guy that went in his place made it, or maybe he died, guess in that case he is not around anymore to be philosophical about it.

Tragic, eh? To not recognize your champion when you see him.

I wasn't in Viet Nam but I was proud to serve in the military of a nation that produced and sheltered Muhammad Ali. A triumph of elevated morality and spirit leaving the silent majority to wander and mutter at his feet.