PDA

View Full Version : Party or country



John Smith
03-26-2016, 05:43 PM
we have an interesting phenomena this election. A good number of Republicans express concerns as to Trump being fit to be president, but, at the same time, they say they'll support him because he's a Republican.

Some won't, but will support/vote for Cruz who they also don't like, but is a Republican.

If they really don't like either of the candidates, why don't they put their country above their party and not support either of them?

S.V. Airlie
03-26-2016, 05:45 PM
Being Republican is hereditary!

Minnesnowtan
03-26-2016, 05:48 PM
Ditto for the Dems.

Ian McColgin
03-26-2016, 05:59 PM
Party affiliation is often a matter of heritage. My parents were the Republican descendants of Republicans going back to the founding of the party and service in our Civil War, and they remained Republican despite the fact that they could not bring themselves to vote Republican for president starting with Nixon's second (and successful) run.

I, of course, am not a Republican.

It's like being born in a Baptist family and maybe deciding to become a Congregationalist. Sometimes you stick to the heritage, struggling to make things right as you do, and sometimes you just try something different.

S.V. Airlie
03-26-2016, 06:02 PM
My mother's side were dems, my father's were republican. I guess that's why I switched from republican to democrat. Equal time for both parents. Of course, I'll have to be a dem for 60 years to be fair!

Captain Intrepid
03-26-2016, 06:15 PM
It's a weird way to exist, having such strong party affiliations. I've voted for three separate national parties within 9 years, ranging from centre-right to far left. If a better option came along I'd be on it in a twinkling.

mdh
03-26-2016, 06:21 PM
Because a democrat would be worse.

Chip-skiff
03-26-2016, 06:29 PM
Wyoming is a one-party state: dominated, mismanaged, robbed, and corrupted by Republicans, the energy industry, and lunatic ranchers.

Democrats are weak, but the only opposition. I'd be a Green, but I might as well go outside and pee straight into the famous wind.

elf
03-26-2016, 06:39 PM
My political community is permeated with Democrats, and many of them voted for Mrs. Clinton which I would deeply prefer not to have to do. Why people of Republican heritage who are profoundly uncomfortable with their choice but would actually consider being willing to vote for Trump or Cruz is completely beyond my ken, but what choice do they have? If they wish to vote (and, for sure it would be fine if they stayed home this time) their only real choice is Mrs. Clinton whose record and philosophy approximate much more closely what they believe.

Sadly, the "establishment" of their party is so disfunctional and ununified that even it cannot admit that Mrs. Clinton is its best option at this point.

Tom Montgomery
03-26-2016, 07:01 PM
Ideology uber alles.

elf
03-26-2016, 07:14 PM
It's a weird way to exist, having such strong party affiliations. I've voted for three separate national parties within 9 years, ranging from centre-right to far left. If a better option came along I'd be on it in a twinkling.
What's better?

Keep in mind that for many people on the Regressive side Mr. Trump is better simply because he's not part of the "establishment" party. Likewise, there are some Sanders supporters who feel similarly about their candidate.

bobbys
03-26-2016, 07:16 PM
we have an interesting phenomena this election. A good number of Republicans express concerns as to Trump being fit to be president, but, at the same time, they say they'll support him because he's a Republican.

Some won't, but will support/vote for Cruz who they also don't like, but is a Republican.

If they really don't like either of the candidates, why don't they put their country above their party and not support either of them?
.

we have things called party platforms.

The candididates should adhere to the platform.

. The Republican Party does not pick the candididates, they can only ask them to pledge the platform..

elf
03-26-2016, 07:28 PM
You missed an important part here, Bobbys. We're not talking about candidates. We're talking about voters. Try again.

S.V. Airlie
03-26-2016, 07:36 PM
.

we have things called party platforms.

The candididates should adhere to the platform.

. The Republican Party does not pick the candididates, they can only ask them to pledge the platform..So, what is this Republican platform you're determined to support?

Captain Intrepid
03-26-2016, 07:44 PM
What's better?

Keep in mind that for many people on the Regressive side Mr. Trump is better simply because he's not part of the "establishment" party. Likewise, there are some Sanders supporters who feel similarly about their candidate.

I don't think any political party should feel safe counting on anyone's vote.