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Jim Bow
03-09-2016, 01:23 PM
I saw a display of bamboo products the other day. Tables, flooring, kitchen ware, and plywood.
Do you suppose the bamboo plywood could be used in boatbuilding?

ron ll
03-09-2016, 01:40 PM
I think bamboo is a grass, not a wood, and it molds. Probably don't want it in yer boat.

Peerie Maa
03-09-2016, 01:41 PM
I saw a display of bamboo products the other day. Tables, flooring, kitchen ware, and plywood.
Do you suppose the bamboo plywood could be used in boatbuilding?

That depends on the glue that they use to laminate it.

David G
03-09-2016, 02:50 PM
That depends on the glue that they use to laminate it.

Just so. And... as the vast majority is manufactured in China - it's almost impossible to get reliable specs on the stuff. I've used to for furniture, wall paneling, and architectural millwork. I'd consider using it on a boat interior, but only with the owners understanding that there would be no guaranty on the adhesive inherent to the product. It can be gorgeous stuff. I much prefer the 'carmelized' finish - and am partial to the 'vertical' cut.

David G
03-09-2016, 03:14 PM
They're selling exterior grade Bamboo decking and siding now, with 20 year limited warranties, so they must have the adhesive down pretty well.

Yes, but I understand from contractor friends that there have been warranty claims. which were not handled well. It's just not a product I'm comfortable with yet. I'll let someone else do the beta testing, and I recommend you do too. Even if they've gotten any lingering customer suervice issues taken care of - that warranty only covers the cost of the material. Not the labor to put it in. Not the time & materials it took to finish it. Not the effort it will takes to demo the bad and replace with new. So I'll pass for now. Maybe it'll turn out to be as dodgy as LP siding. Maybe it'll turn out to be a serious product, like Trex. But for now... I'll stick to the interior applications. When they get it sorted, though, it could be a most excellent product.

BrianY
03-09-2016, 03:28 PM
Bamboo plywood is expensive, at least in these parts. Boulter Plywood has 3/4" 4'x8' sheets for $325.00 and 1/4" 4'x8' for $195. For comparison, they list quarter sawn ribbon stripe Sapele in the same sizes for $120.00 and $105

Plyboo brand bamboo plywood is rated for interior use only according to the Plyboo website

David G
03-09-2016, 03:35 PM
Bamboo plywood is expensive, at least in these parts. Boulter Plywood has 3/4" 4'x8' sheets for $325.00 and 1/4" 4'x8' for $195. For comparison, they list quarter sawn ribbon stripe Sapele in the same sizes for $120.00 and $105

Plyboo brand bamboo plywood is rated for interior use only according to the Plyboo website

Yes, that's true. Quite expensive. But people like it both for the look, and the durability. It's both hard and tough. And the 'carmelized' or lovely honey-brown option is achieved with heat, and the color is integral. It's not something where the 'stain' is gonna wear off. And the look is certainly unique.

Nicholas Scheuer
03-09-2016, 03:42 PM
Read an article about Bamboo furniture years ago which said the hollow shafted stuff we often see is not really Bamboo ands in fact a grass. The Bamboo used for furniture has solid shafts and is much more durable.

Peerie Maa
03-09-2016, 04:23 PM
The Bamboo used for furniture has solid shafts and is much more durable.

That would be rattan cane, which is solid and bends easier than bamboo which being hollow will collapse if bent to a tight radius.
http://www.vietnamrattan.net/files/sanpham/8/1/jpg/powder-rattan-cane-25-35mm.jpghttp://www.ikea.com/PIAimages/31428_PE120743_S5.JPG

Nicholas Scheuer
03-09-2016, 05:18 PM
So, which type of Bamboo is used for high-rise scaffolding in China?

Peerie Maa
03-09-2016, 05:18 PM
There are several varieties of bamboo with culms ranging from thick-walled (Moso) to solid (Dendrocalamus strictus).

http://www.bamboocreasian.com/bamboo_pole_construction/bamboo_poles%20_solid%203.jpg

Fairy Nuff, but does it bend? If it does not bend it is not normally used for furniture without being sawn up and laminated.

Peerie Maa
03-09-2016, 05:48 PM
The thicker the culm wall, the less flexible. It can still be used for building furniture and other structures. It just can't be woven. D. strictus is native to Viet Nam, and I spent many a restful hour in a chair made from it.

It was also used for Punji stakes.

And, apparently, the shafts of cavalry lances. Puts a whole new meaning to sitting on bamboo.

Peerie Maa
03-09-2016, 06:01 PM
AFAIK, the VC had no Heavy Horse.

Different times, different places, Donn.