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stephen.vincent
02-25-2016, 05:52 PM
Hi all,

I'm restoring an old Snipe (http://snipe1953.blogspot.com). Some of the planks (3/4 inch mahogany) have iron sickness where the galvanized steel screws rusted. I'm pulling these screws, filling the holes with epoxy, and refastening by drilling new holes. I have been filling the planks below the water line with West 205/206 with fiber filler. The resulting patch is white.

My question to the group is, can i color the epoxy in order to better blend it with the wood for the few areas that I will be patching above the waterline? (topsides will be bright, hull will be painted below the waterline).

I've considered adding sawdust/wood fiber, but wondering if there is a stain of other coloring agent that can be used.

Thanks!

Steve

GregH
02-25-2016, 06:07 PM
West does make only 2 coloring agents for their epoxy- black & white! However, I did call them a while ago to ask if anything else is usable. To my surprise, their techy recommended Ritz fabric dye! It does work, and there are quite a lot of colors to choose from- just be sure to stir it VERY well into the epoxy before adding the hardener.

wizbang 13
02-25-2016, 07:16 PM
What;s doin here... glass bottom boat?
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-tlETIGnM5L4/VsKX8sDqCII/AAAAAAAAAaE/XY2ENRBvG3Q/s640/blogger-image-1736611222.jpg

stephen.vincent
02-25-2016, 07:22 PM
Ha, that would be an upside down boat, in the garage, with the bottom planks removed so you are looking at the bottom of the decking and looking "up" through the cockpit opening

Gerarddm
02-25-2016, 07:39 PM
I tried mixing WEST epoxy with wood flour of the same species as the piece to be repaired; it came out way too dark. The Ritz dye idea seems well worth experimenting with.

(Incidentally, the same thing happened with Titebond III )

Jim.Montana
02-25-2016, 08:51 PM
I keep sanding dust of various shades on hand for tinting epoxy. Add a little to get the shade you want then continue to thicken with the appropriate West product. Works great. I generally do this for non structural stuff only. I don't worry about matching wood species.

jpatrick
02-25-2016, 09:43 PM
Why don't you use wood plugs instead of epoxy on the top sides?

Jeff

JimConlin
02-25-2016, 09:59 PM
I've come close with a a mix of quartz microspheres (http://www.mertons.com/Additives/bubbles.html) and various wood flours (fine sanding dust).

JimD
02-25-2016, 11:50 PM
I tried mixing WEST epoxy with wood flour of the same species as the piece to be repaired; it came out way too dark.

Add fumed silica to lighten it. Experiment a bit with silica and flour combo to get much closer to a match.

mick allen
02-26-2016, 12:13 AM
do not use Ritz coloring dye on any exterior application - it will fade very quickly - it must be unstable to UV. I know of a beautiful large dye job that became paint material after only a couple of years [under epoxy]. It was absolutely heartbreaking what happened to an amazing artistic endeavour. However I have used colouring [say used for polyester] tints up to about 5% resin ratio in quite a few applications. And have used aniline dyes under epoxy that have lasted for over a decade.

Max F
02-26-2016, 12:34 AM
I ususally mix microfibers until I nearly get the right consitency and then add wood flour to darken it from the same species untill I get a colour match.
Works pretty well most of the times.
Filler 405 from west System works sometimes great on light colored teak.

stephen.vincent
02-26-2016, 12:26 PM
Why don't you use wood plugs instead of epoxy on the top sides?

Jeff

Hi Jeff, That is probably the direction I will go, have already used plugs for a few areas, but, in the end, I'm trying to be lazy :D. I also have one area where I need to fill an area that is larger than just the screw hole. basically, I'm looking to add colored epoxy to the arsenal of tools, along with plugs (plugs being the preferred method)

Steve

JimD
02-26-2016, 01:32 PM
Hi Jeff, That is probably the direction I will go, have already used plugs for a few areas, but, in the end, I'm trying to be lazy :D. I also have one area where I need to fill an area that is larger than just the screw hole. basically, I'm looking to add colored epoxy to the arsenal of tools, along with plugs (plugs being the preferred method)

SteveAs far as lazy is concerned, you'll probably find the plugs to be less work.

chuckt
02-26-2016, 03:31 PM
I'd be interested if there is a solution for this. I also found that wood dust comes out too dark.

stephen.vincent
02-27-2016, 03:35 AM
As far as lazy is concerned, you'll probably find the plugs to be less work.

Jim, absolutely true. I can plug a bad spot in about a minute, epoxy takes much longer.

jpatrick
02-27-2016, 12:16 PM
It really doesn't matter what sort of dust, dye, or magic powder one mixes with epoxy. The resultant goo will be monochromatic whereas wood is not. Thus, the patch will visually "pop out." A person can employ trompe l'oeil painting to make the patch appear to be wood but the technique is difficult to master and is time consuming.

Plugs cut from the same wood species is the best way.

Jeff

JimD
02-27-2016, 01:23 PM
I'd be interested if there is a solution for this. I also found that wood dust comes out too dark.As said above, experiment with adding fumed silica and/or flour of a lighter species wood. You won't get a perfect match but you can get quite close.

paul oman
02-28-2016, 08:22 AM
one should use universal pigment gels made for epoxies - not fabric dyes. if you are going to do it, do it right with professional products!

paul oman
progressive epoxy polymers inc - epoxyproducts.com