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preserved_killick
02-12-2016, 08:25 AM
Are Oarlock Risers normally just glued to the top surface of the gunwale? I'm thinking of milling a riser block with a tenon that fits into the space between the inwale and the hull; am I overthinking this?

Also, I'm in the middle of gluing small blocks to the hull for scuppered gunwales and I'd like the oarlock riser ends to land in the middle of one of a block like this:

http://s21.postimg.org/3sblhl3hj/IMG_20160211_171831.jpg

But, taking the dimensions for the oarlock riser block from the plans, the thing is 10.5 inches long. It looks huge on this 13 foot boat. Granted, the shape I cut out is rather chunky. And, I'm also thinking that under the riser block should be solid wood with not spaces for strength and gluing surface..correct?

http://s12.postimg.org/6t35gc3ul/IMG_20160211_171731.jpg

Is there a need to make the riser block so long? I'm a tall guy, so I want to keep as much height in the block as reasonable aesthetics allow.

I'm thinking I may make a different set that look more like this person did, the block can be somewhat long while looking less chunky, and maybe cut a bit of a curve into the block to match the curve of the hull:

http://s9.postimg.org/c1b0vnf5r/483959_527720377271660_589338676_n.jpg

Am I overthinking this?

Thorne
02-12-2016, 10:07 AM
Remember that ALL the motive force for propelling the boat comes down on those oarlock risers -- so bolt them down with washers at least on the bottom. You should also epoxy them in place, but I would never rely on just glue. If you don't want to use bolts then use screws with a decent bite into the gunwale.

Same thing for the metal oarlock base -- use bolts rather than screws or they'll come loose when rowing hard, often at the very worst time. Don't ask me how I know this. ;-)

As for the length and shape, that's a hard call to make. They do look a bit long, but that could be the camera's distorted view. The shape matters most if you'll be sliding it upside down over supports or roof rack bars, which is where the softer curve is nice. What are the dimensions of these at this point?

rgthom
02-12-2016, 11:04 AM
Are you sure of the correct location for the locks? You might want to just hold them with clamps for a few test rows to make sure you like the position.

They do look a might long from the pictures, you could almost cut the one in half to make two...

preserved_killick
02-12-2016, 11:15 AM
Thanks Thorne, mine are 10.5 inches in length, and whatever I end up with I'll definitely use fasteners along with epoxy.

rgthom, in the photos I've just placed the block on the rails to see how they look for with, they are not in the correct location. D. Hylan does specify an exact location for the oarlock socket hole.

PK

rgthom
02-12-2016, 11:22 AM
Hylan's specified location might not be optimum for your build and rowing style. If you mostly sail it won't matter, but if you are planning a lot of rowing it helps to try the location before locking everything down.

Rick in Pender Harbour
02-12-2016, 12:13 PM
I vote for the risers with the longer taper, they look more elegant, and will certainly be strong enough. On my boats, I use screws and epoxy, and have never had a failure. Oh, bolts would be better on the oarlock sockets themselves,
screws do tend to work loose sometimes.

Rgds

Rick

Dave Lesser
02-12-2016, 01:51 PM
Jeff,

I made my inwales and spacers a little thinner than Doug's plans called for, so I had to move the risers inboard so that the oarlock shafts would not touch the planking.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1530/24686481080_471354f44b_b.jpg

I glued and fastened a support block to the inner face of the inwales.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1555/24351408964_b291e466e7_b.jpg

I think that the lower profile looks nicer. Instead of spacer blocks under the risers, I used a single piece of stock of the same thickness. That provided a larger gluing surface for the risers to land on.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1561/24614878209_8f6d97c4d8_b.jpg

Tom Robb
02-12-2016, 03:37 PM
Is there some sort of reason to make them so very long? Those look way longer than any I've ever seen.
And yes clamp them on and try them out before you make them more or less permanent.
How tall are you, how far will you be rowing, what is the geometry of the oar/free-board/ length of oar/ height of seat, etc?
Or just go with the generic plan info and don't worry about it. You'll probably get accustomed to what ever it turns out to be anyway.

rgthom
02-12-2016, 04:04 PM
Below are Thorne's, more the length I'm used to. Since both Beach Pea builders above are making them longer that must be what Hylan wants - they should be very secure.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4065/4541004222_c6efbd4ed8.jpg

Thorne
02-12-2016, 04:10 PM
Well, mine are certainly nothing to copy! When I pull really hard the whole wale and lock base flexes a tiny bit, haven't seen any cracking but it is a bit unsettling.

They work OK but would be better if they were longer and more gently curved, both for more secure/stiffer attachment to the gunwale and for sliding onto my roof rack for the rare cartopping trip. The other alternative is to make an additional support to keep them braced against the hull underneath the inwale, which I may still do.

Baaaack to the topic, I really like Dave Lesser's bases above, particularly the clever bracing inside the inwale. Lovely!

Dave Lesser
02-12-2016, 05:19 PM
Thanks, Thorne. They took a little head scratching. I came VERY close to fastening them on top of the planking stock, and would have drilled right into the sheer strake for the oar lock fittings.


Are you sure of the correct location for the locks? You might want to just hold them with clamps for a few test rows to make sure you like the position.

The oar locks on the Beach Pea are positioned equidistant between the two thwarts. This allows the rower to face either direction so that proper trim can be maintained with varying loads or numbers of passengers. When solo, you sit on the center thwart, but with a passenger, you sit on the "forward" thwart with the passenger on the stern sheets.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5468/9927491674_87f16d59ca_o.jpg


...maybe cut a bit of a curve into the block to match the curve of the hull...
Good idea. It's a small detail, but it makes a big difference in the appearance.

preserved_killick
02-12-2016, 05:43 PM
I've been out skiing in too cold weather. Love the added comments!





The oar locks on the Beach Pea are positioned equidistant between the two thwarts. This allows the rower to face either direction so that proper trim can be maintained with varying loads or numbers of passengers. When solo, you sit on the center thwart, but with a passenger, you sit on the "forward" thwart with the passenger on the stern sheets.


Dave,

How clever, I didn't realize this! Your risers do look like they fit the boat well. Are they full length according to plans? I've got long legs, so I bet I'll want more height like Thorne's risers.

I don't have good dust control, so I prefer to run the table saw outside. When temps rise above 20F in a few days I'm going to have a go at a second, sleeker set.

Gerarddm
02-13-2016, 03:15 AM
Definitely take the time to slightly curve them to match the sheer curve. Your eye will forever thank you.