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rockhard
02-26-2001, 09:04 AM
Does anyone know where to get long bronze bolts for a barndoor rudder repair. I am thinking of taking a bronze rod and threading the end and welding a bolt head onto it. anyone ever done this.

Rock

rockhard
02-26-2001, 09:04 AM
Does anyone know where to get long bronze bolts for a barndoor rudder repair. I am thinking of taking a bronze rod and threading the end and welding a bolt head onto it. anyone ever done this.

Rock

rockhard
02-26-2001, 09:04 AM
Does anyone know where to get long bronze bolts for a barndoor rudder repair. I am thinking of taking a bronze rod and threading the end and welding a bolt head onto it. anyone ever done this.

Rock

Thad
02-26-2001, 09:27 AM
That is the way to do it except that there are questions about the temper of the bronze after brazing so solder or a pin or just peening the bolt end might be better.

Thad
02-26-2001, 09:27 AM
That is the way to do it except that there are questions about the temper of the bronze after brazing so solder or a pin or just peening the bolt end might be better.

Thad
02-26-2001, 09:27 AM
That is the way to do it except that there are questions about the temper of the bronze after brazing so solder or a pin or just peening the bolt end might be better.

Bruce Hooke
02-26-2001, 03:28 PM
Or just thread and put a nut on both ends. One technique I have used in other situations is to thread just enough of the rod end to allow the nut to be threaded on. Then pin the nut in place with a pin of the same metal (ideally a tappered pin). Then file the pin and the rod end flush with the nut. The end result looks and behaves almost exactly like a standard 'bolt head'. For that matter, I don't see any reason why you couldn't substitute brazing for the pin I describe above.

Bruce Hooke
02-26-2001, 03:28 PM
Or just thread and put a nut on both ends. One technique I have used in other situations is to thread just enough of the rod end to allow the nut to be threaded on. Then pin the nut in place with a pin of the same metal (ideally a tappered pin). Then file the pin and the rod end flush with the nut. The end result looks and behaves almost exactly like a standard 'bolt head'. For that matter, I don't see any reason why you couldn't substitute brazing for the pin I describe above.

Bruce Hooke
02-26-2001, 03:28 PM
Or just thread and put a nut on both ends. One technique I have used in other situations is to thread just enough of the rod end to allow the nut to be threaded on. Then pin the nut in place with a pin of the same metal (ideally a tappered pin). Then file the pin and the rod end flush with the nut. The end result looks and behaves almost exactly like a standard 'bolt head'. For that matter, I don't see any reason why you couldn't substitute brazing for the pin I describe above.

jerry s
02-26-2001, 09:12 PM
you didn't mention how long the bolts need to be. I've used bronze all-thread that has worked pretty good and galvanized iron or steel is readily available and muuuch cheaper.

jerry s
02-26-2001, 09:12 PM
you didn't mention how long the bolts need to be. I've used bronze all-thread that has worked pretty good and galvanized iron or steel is readily available and muuuch cheaper.

jerry s
02-26-2001, 09:12 PM
you didn't mention how long the bolts need to be. I've used bronze all-thread that has worked pretty good and galvanized iron or steel is readily available and muuuch cheaper.

Bayboat
02-28-2001, 10:22 AM
The trouble with using threaded rod is that water will follow the threads. To try to avoid this you can drill the hole slightly under-size and make threads in the wood with the rod. Or you can slush the rod with epoxy. The trouble with both is that you'll have a hard time getting the rod out if you ever need to. Best is to put unthreaded rod slushed with beeswax (not soap) in a hole just slightly smaller. Put a nut & washer at each end and peen the end of the rod (one end if you are making a drift). There's no need to weld or braze it. You can countersink the nut, making the countersink big enough to get a thin-wall socket on it to tighten it. Then peen, using a large-diameter punch. Peen it just enough to hold the nut, so it can be backed off if ever necessary. Then put in a wooden plug as usual. This way you can remove the plugs and tighten the nuts if necessary.
Jamestown Distributors for the rod, nuts & washers

[This message has been edited by Bayboat (edited 02-28-2001).]

Bayboat
02-28-2001, 10:22 AM
The trouble with using threaded rod is that water will follow the threads. To try to avoid this you can drill the hole slightly under-size and make threads in the wood with the rod. Or you can slush the rod with epoxy. The trouble with both is that you'll have a hard time getting the rod out if you ever need to. Best is to put unthreaded rod slushed with beeswax (not soap) in a hole just slightly smaller. Put a nut & washer at each end and peen the end of the rod (one end if you are making a drift). There's no need to weld or braze it. You can countersink the nut, making the countersink big enough to get a thin-wall socket on it to tighten it. Then peen, using a large-diameter punch. Peen it just enough to hold the nut, so it can be backed off if ever necessary. Then put in a wooden plug as usual. This way you can remove the plugs and tighten the nuts if necessary.
Jamestown Distributors for the rod, nuts & washers

[This message has been edited by Bayboat (edited 02-28-2001).]

Bayboat
02-28-2001, 10:22 AM
The trouble with using threaded rod is that water will follow the threads. To try to avoid this you can drill the hole slightly under-size and make threads in the wood with the rod. Or you can slush the rod with epoxy. The trouble with both is that you'll have a hard time getting the rod out if you ever need to. Best is to put unthreaded rod slushed with beeswax (not soap) in a hole just slightly smaller. Put a nut & washer at each end and peen the end of the rod (one end if you are making a drift). There's no need to weld or braze it. You can countersink the nut, making the countersink big enough to get a thin-wall socket on it to tighten it. Then peen, using a large-diameter punch. Peen it just enough to hold the nut, so it can be backed off if ever necessary. Then put in a wooden plug as usual. This way you can remove the plugs and tighten the nuts if necessary.
Jamestown Distributors for the rod, nuts & washers

[This message has been edited by Bayboat (edited 02-28-2001).]