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formerlyknownasprince
12-23-2003, 08:36 AM
I know Bob just did a similar story over in the Bilge - but here are some photos of us milling some Spotted Gum yesterday, which we will use to replace some ribs on Grantala when we slip her on 12 January. The ribs are made up of two pieces of 55mm x 19mm Spotted Gum. We also cut some 4 x 2s to replace bearers under the rear cabin sole and a larger piece over the shafts.

Choosing and dropping the tree - limited to a friend's block on this occasion, so we had to put up with trees about half the diameter that we would have preferred.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pfc8644f1f90c7607eecf4ffb58723aae/fa38f346.jpg

Yes, we know its naughty to not wear earmuffs, but the Stihl's a quiet saw.

A little mechanical assistance - we had the mill already set up doing some Blue Gum milling at the friends house, so we moved the timber to the mill, rather than the alternative. Just after we took this photo, a small - one foot long - copperhead snake emerged from the disturbed earth at our feet. Venomous but not aggressive. I also discovered a boot full of blood at this stage - a rather full leech being the culprit.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pe457c1ddaf22aeab5fb4b2998126fefd/fa38f30b.jpg

Proof that office workers also hold real tools sometimes - even if they are watching someone else do the work.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pfcdf28222f166f82730b4e017de4e52a/fa38f2f0.jpg

Really though, once we got the logs to here, we rolled them in and lined them up by hand. I even managed to bend that poxy little crowbar a couple of times moving the logs in.

Into the first log - and showing one of the problems with milling Spotted Gum - the huge amount of sapwood on these things. We dropped a much larger tree this morning that was near the house, but it was hollow and unuseable.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pde878b3256b99eaa23fd6d675e605974/fa38f2d5.jpg

I needed this piece of 155mm x 120mm for a couple of 550mm long pieces that look like they may need replacing due to chemical decay around some bolts. Unfortunately, with small trees like this, Paul (my cousin, an arborist, who owns the mill) was in to the heartwood.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/p636b9ea9141e9c32d035c0a3ad63674d/fa38f281.jpg

We had no trouble milling two logs together - just worked our way across each in turn, then down and across again.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/p414f06b1d77278a87792f8a728566296/fa38f25c.jpg

My share of the booty - after the 350 km trip home this afternoon. We also cut about 120 lineal metres of 2" x 3/4" for a friend of Paul's - who is building a 24 foot planing hull. with Paul taking the balance for general use around his sheds.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pf30069788217622df5810950dcbcdf6d/fa38f24b.jpg

formerlyknownasprince
12-23-2003, 08:36 AM
I know Bob just did a similar story over in the Bilge - but here are some photos of us milling some Spotted Gum yesterday, which we will use to replace some ribs on Grantala when we slip her on 12 January. The ribs are made up of two pieces of 55mm x 19mm Spotted Gum. We also cut some 4 x 2s to replace bearers under the rear cabin sole and a larger piece over the shafts.

Choosing and dropping the tree - limited to a friend's block on this occasion, so we had to put up with trees about half the diameter that we would have preferred.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pfc8644f1f90c7607eecf4ffb58723aae/fa38f346.jpg

Yes, we know its naughty to not wear earmuffs, but the Stihl's a quiet saw.

A little mechanical assistance - we had the mill already set up doing some Blue Gum milling at the friends house, so we moved the timber to the mill, rather than the alternative. Just after we took this photo, a small - one foot long - copperhead snake emerged from the disturbed earth at our feet. Venomous but not aggressive. I also discovered a boot full of blood at this stage - a rather full leech being the culprit.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pe457c1ddaf22aeab5fb4b2998126fefd/fa38f30b.jpg

Proof that office workers also hold real tools sometimes - even if they are watching someone else do the work.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pfcdf28222f166f82730b4e017de4e52a/fa38f2f0.jpg

Really though, once we got the logs to here, we rolled them in and lined them up by hand. I even managed to bend that poxy little crowbar a couple of times moving the logs in.

Into the first log - and showing one of the problems with milling Spotted Gum - the huge amount of sapwood on these things. We dropped a much larger tree this morning that was near the house, but it was hollow and unuseable.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pde878b3256b99eaa23fd6d675e605974/fa38f2d5.jpg

I needed this piece of 155mm x 120mm for a couple of 550mm long pieces that look like they may need replacing due to chemical decay around some bolts. Unfortunately, with small trees like this, Paul (my cousin, an arborist, who owns the mill) was in to the heartwood.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/p636b9ea9141e9c32d035c0a3ad63674d/fa38f281.jpg

We had no trouble milling two logs together - just worked our way across each in turn, then down and across again.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/p414f06b1d77278a87792f8a728566296/fa38f25c.jpg

My share of the booty - after the 350 km trip home this afternoon. We also cut about 120 lineal metres of 2" x 3/4" for a friend of Paul's - who is building a 24 foot planing hull. with Paul taking the balance for general use around his sheds.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pf30069788217622df5810950dcbcdf6d/fa38f24b.jpg

formerlyknownasprince
12-23-2003, 08:36 AM
I know Bob just did a similar story over in the Bilge - but here are some photos of us milling some Spotted Gum yesterday, which we will use to replace some ribs on Grantala when we slip her on 12 January. The ribs are made up of two pieces of 55mm x 19mm Spotted Gum. We also cut some 4 x 2s to replace bearers under the rear cabin sole and a larger piece over the shafts.

Choosing and dropping the tree - limited to a friend's block on this occasion, so we had to put up with trees about half the diameter that we would have preferred.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pfc8644f1f90c7607eecf4ffb58723aae/fa38f346.jpg

Yes, we know its naughty to not wear earmuffs, but the Stihl's a quiet saw.

A little mechanical assistance - we had the mill already set up doing some Blue Gum milling at the friends house, so we moved the timber to the mill, rather than the alternative. Just after we took this photo, a small - one foot long - copperhead snake emerged from the disturbed earth at our feet. Venomous but not aggressive. I also discovered a boot full of blood at this stage - a rather full leech being the culprit.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pe457c1ddaf22aeab5fb4b2998126fefd/fa38f30b.jpg

Proof that office workers also hold real tools sometimes - even if they are watching someone else do the work.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pfcdf28222f166f82730b4e017de4e52a/fa38f2f0.jpg

Really though, once we got the logs to here, we rolled them in and lined them up by hand. I even managed to bend that poxy little crowbar a couple of times moving the logs in.

Into the first log - and showing one of the problems with milling Spotted Gum - the huge amount of sapwood on these things. We dropped a much larger tree this morning that was near the house, but it was hollow and unuseable.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pde878b3256b99eaa23fd6d675e605974/fa38f2d5.jpg

I needed this piece of 155mm x 120mm for a couple of 550mm long pieces that look like they may need replacing due to chemical decay around some bolts. Unfortunately, with small trees like this, Paul (my cousin, an arborist, who owns the mill) was in to the heartwood.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/p636b9ea9141e9c32d035c0a3ad63674d/fa38f281.jpg

We had no trouble milling two logs together - just worked our way across each in turn, then down and across again.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/p414f06b1d77278a87792f8a728566296/fa38f25c.jpg

My share of the booty - after the 350 km trip home this afternoon. We also cut about 120 lineal metres of 2" x 3/4" for a friend of Paul's - who is building a 24 foot planing hull. with Paul taking the balance for general use around his sheds.

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid94/pf30069788217622df5810950dcbcdf6d/fa38f24b.jpg

Ken Hutchins
12-23-2003, 09:28 AM
Not all Australians work that way, my son works down under. He wears all the safety equipment, steel toe and shank boots, chaps, helmet, face shield, ear muffs, carries a first aid kit on his belt, etc, etc. Yes this all saved his life 6 months ago when a dead tree uprooted and came down on him. It was not the tree he was cutting. He got a broken arm and splintered hip. The safety gear he was wearing saved his life, the helmet was destroyed with the impact but he had no head injury. He has been working in the woods for 23 years. Initially worked here in New Hampshire, then for the US Forest service in Montana before going down under. Trained and certified both by the US and QLD, plenty of experience, very safety minded. Work in the woods long enough and eventually it happens.

Ken Hutchins
12-23-2003, 09:28 AM
Not all Australians work that way, my son works down under. He wears all the safety equipment, steel toe and shank boots, chaps, helmet, face shield, ear muffs, carries a first aid kit on his belt, etc, etc. Yes this all saved his life 6 months ago when a dead tree uprooted and came down on him. It was not the tree he was cutting. He got a broken arm and splintered hip. The safety gear he was wearing saved his life, the helmet was destroyed with the impact but he had no head injury. He has been working in the woods for 23 years. Initially worked here in New Hampshire, then for the US Forest service in Montana before going down under. Trained and certified both by the US and QLD, plenty of experience, very safety minded. Work in the woods long enough and eventually it happens.

Ken Hutchins
12-23-2003, 09:28 AM
Not all Australians work that way, my son works down under. He wears all the safety equipment, steel toe and shank boots, chaps, helmet, face shield, ear muffs, carries a first aid kit on his belt, etc, etc. Yes this all saved his life 6 months ago when a dead tree uprooted and came down on him. It was not the tree he was cutting. He got a broken arm and splintered hip. The safety gear he was wearing saved his life, the helmet was destroyed with the impact but he had no head injury. He has been working in the woods for 23 years. Initially worked here in New Hampshire, then for the US Forest service in Montana before going down under. Trained and certified both by the US and QLD, plenty of experience, very safety minded. Work in the woods long enough and eventually it happens.

Bob Smalser
12-23-2003, 04:00 PM
Thanks for the post...nice to think I'm not alone among boat folks who use computers...these mills make so much sense and free or cheap logs are so readily available most places I dunno why more don't do this in their back yards...hence the intent of my post on doing it without heavy equipment.

Your skidder looks like it lacks an arch to raise the log...there a winch on the back of it?

Bob Smalser
12-23-2003, 04:00 PM
Thanks for the post...nice to think I'm not alone among boat folks who use computers...these mills make so much sense and free or cheap logs are so readily available most places I dunno why more don't do this in their back yards...hence the intent of my post on doing it without heavy equipment.

Your skidder looks like it lacks an arch to raise the log...there a winch on the back of it?

Bob Smalser
12-23-2003, 04:00 PM
Thanks for the post...nice to think I'm not alone among boat folks who use computers...these mills make so much sense and free or cheap logs are so readily available most places I dunno why more don't do this in their back yards...hence the intent of my post on doing it without heavy equipment.

Your skidder looks like it lacks an arch to raise the log...there a winch on the back of it?

formerlyknownasprince
12-23-2003, 05:48 PM
Ken said
a dead tree uprooted and came down on himThis is exactly what happened to another cousin of mine, from the other side of the family. He had all the gear on and was extremely conscious of his safety, but was crushed from behind by a dead tree. He had two young kids too. Very sad.

I'm extremely conscious of dead and falling trees, believe me! As Paul said as we were getting this tree - if anything goes wrong, don't try to outrun it - go sideways away from it.

Bob asked about the skidder. It has a small lifting arm at the back, don't know what its called, but it only gave about 3' of lift. We had to pull this log out a bit, unhitch, turn around and move it to a safer position with the blade before taking it out.

I'll post a couple more pics later on another thread showing the safe way to do the felling cut and a bit more of the getting the timber out.

Ian

formerlyknownasprince
12-23-2003, 05:48 PM
Ken said
a dead tree uprooted and came down on himThis is exactly what happened to another cousin of mine, from the other side of the family. He had all the gear on and was extremely conscious of his safety, but was crushed from behind by a dead tree. He had two young kids too. Very sad.

I'm extremely conscious of dead and falling trees, believe me! As Paul said as we were getting this tree - if anything goes wrong, don't try to outrun it - go sideways away from it.

Bob asked about the skidder. It has a small lifting arm at the back, don't know what its called, but it only gave about 3' of lift. We had to pull this log out a bit, unhitch, turn around and move it to a safer position with the blade before taking it out.

I'll post a couple more pics later on another thread showing the safe way to do the felling cut and a bit more of the getting the timber out.

Ian

formerlyknownasprince
12-23-2003, 05:48 PM
Ken said
a dead tree uprooted and came down on himThis is exactly what happened to another cousin of mine, from the other side of the family. He had all the gear on and was extremely conscious of his safety, but was crushed from behind by a dead tree. He had two young kids too. Very sad.

I'm extremely conscious of dead and falling trees, believe me! As Paul said as we were getting this tree - if anything goes wrong, don't try to outrun it - go sideways away from it.

Bob asked about the skidder. It has a small lifting arm at the back, don't know what its called, but it only gave about 3' of lift. We had to pull this log out a bit, unhitch, turn around and move it to a safer position with the blade before taking it out.

I'll post a couple more pics later on another thread showing the safe way to do the felling cut and a bit more of the getting the timber out.

Ian

Bob Smalser
12-24-2003, 12:11 PM
While I'm not pooh-poohing the importance of safety gear...especially if you do that stuff every day like we do and you have the old Probabilities and Statistics Monster to deal with...it can also be pure eyewash.

Like some of the dumb "safety" gimmicks I've seen over the years...safety officers handing out green stick-on dots for your watch face comes to mind...so looking at the green dot will have you "think safety". Counterproductive nonsense.

The bottom line in safety is to be well enuf trained and have enuf experience and discipline to "think through" ahead of time every small facet of the task you are about to perform...anticipating what can go wrong and having a plan for it in the back of your mind you don't have to think about for even an instant when that situation arises.

The faller in your pic looks to me like he knows what he's about...he obviously sighted the tree first because of where he's placed his cut based on bole lean, and when he did I suspect he noticed no unsound branches on it or its mates it will brush on the way down. He has a clear escape path and most importantly, he's not on his knees....we kneel with firs and cedars but never ever with alders and madronas...and having dropped a few Euchalyptus, I suspect your Blue Gums behave like our madronas.

Bob Smalser
12-24-2003, 12:11 PM
While I'm not pooh-poohing the importance of safety gear...especially if you do that stuff every day like we do and you have the old Probabilities and Statistics Monster to deal with...it can also be pure eyewash.

Like some of the dumb "safety" gimmicks I've seen over the years...safety officers handing out green stick-on dots for your watch face comes to mind...so looking at the green dot will have you "think safety". Counterproductive nonsense.

The bottom line in safety is to be well enuf trained and have enuf experience and discipline to "think through" ahead of time every small facet of the task you are about to perform...anticipating what can go wrong and having a plan for it in the back of your mind you don't have to think about for even an instant when that situation arises.

The faller in your pic looks to me like he knows what he's about...he obviously sighted the tree first because of where he's placed his cut based on bole lean, and when he did I suspect he noticed no unsound branches on it or its mates it will brush on the way down. He has a clear escape path and most importantly, he's not on his knees....we kneel with firs and cedars but never ever with alders and madronas...and having dropped a few Euchalyptus, I suspect your Blue Gums behave like our madronas.

Bob Smalser
12-24-2003, 12:11 PM
While I'm not pooh-poohing the importance of safety gear...especially if you do that stuff every day like we do and you have the old Probabilities and Statistics Monster to deal with...it can also be pure eyewash.

Like some of the dumb "safety" gimmicks I've seen over the years...safety officers handing out green stick-on dots for your watch face comes to mind...so looking at the green dot will have you "think safety". Counterproductive nonsense.

The bottom line in safety is to be well enuf trained and have enuf experience and discipline to "think through" ahead of time every small facet of the task you are about to perform...anticipating what can go wrong and having a plan for it in the back of your mind you don't have to think about for even an instant when that situation arises.

The faller in your pic looks to me like he knows what he's about...he obviously sighted the tree first because of where he's placed his cut based on bole lean, and when he did I suspect he noticed no unsound branches on it or its mates it will brush on the way down. He has a clear escape path and most importantly, he's not on his knees....we kneel with firs and cedars but never ever with alders and madronas...and having dropped a few Euchalyptus, I suspect your Blue Gums behave like our madronas.

Bob Smalser
12-25-2003, 01:34 AM
My all-time favorite safety briefing?


If you drink and drive...don't smoke. "Safety Briefings" mainly being a complete waste of time if ya haven't done the blocking and tackling first in training and discipline.

[ 12-25-2003, 09:34 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
12-25-2003, 01:34 AM
My all-time favorite safety briefing?


If you drink and drive...don't smoke. "Safety Briefings" mainly being a complete waste of time if ya haven't done the blocking and tackling first in training and discipline.

[ 12-25-2003, 09:34 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Bob Smalser
12-25-2003, 01:34 AM
My all-time favorite safety briefing?


If you drink and drive...don't smoke. "Safety Briefings" mainly being a complete waste of time if ya haven't done the blocking and tackling first in training and discipline.

[ 12-25-2003, 09:34 AM: Message edited by: Bob Smalser ]

Wild Dingo
12-25-2003, 03:30 AM
I do believe if you look at that first pic the fella with the chainsaw does indeed have safety boots on... and perhaps even saftey glasses but I cant be sure since the picture isnt of his face nor even really close... safety specs do nowadays look very much the same as a good pair of sunglasses.

Now the fella doin the millin has I believe a saftey face shield on along with the boots which I have no doubt would be steel capped at least...

These fellas are damned saftey up the wazooo compared to many professional millers Ive watched one of whom wore thongs and shorts nothing else! but had been cuttin and millin timber for many many years and knew EXACTLY where his next cut would be and what the timber would do and what was happenin around him... I believe Bob is right in knowing what your doin and makin sure you are aware at all times of potential problems so you can act without thinkin to save your bum in a bad situation... or someone elses if need be... but accidents WILL happen regardless of the amount of safety gear one uses.

Ooooh and its gettin FLAMIN HOT downunder just now :eek: ... and by cripes when it gets hot its just too damned hot to put long strides on chaps on bloody thick shirts on plus plus plus :rolleyes: ...I say well done Ian Paul and mates :cool:

Great lookin wood and man Ive got me a hankerin to have one of those Lucus Mills one day... ripsnorter of a peice of machinery!! ;)

Edited to add... dont boat trailers make aweflaminsome timber movein trailers?!! :D

[ 12-25-2003, 03:31 AM: Message edited by: Wild Dingo ]

Wild Dingo
12-25-2003, 03:30 AM
I do believe if you look at that first pic the fella with the chainsaw does indeed have safety boots on... and perhaps even saftey glasses but I cant be sure since the picture isnt of his face nor even really close... safety specs do nowadays look very much the same as a good pair of sunglasses.

Now the fella doin the millin has I believe a saftey face shield on along with the boots which I have no doubt would be steel capped at least...

These fellas are damned saftey up the wazooo compared to many professional millers Ive watched one of whom wore thongs and shorts nothing else! but had been cuttin and millin timber for many many years and knew EXACTLY where his next cut would be and what the timber would do and what was happenin around him... I believe Bob is right in knowing what your doin and makin sure you are aware at all times of potential problems so you can act without thinkin to save your bum in a bad situation... or someone elses if need be... but accidents WILL happen regardless of the amount of safety gear one uses.

Ooooh and its gettin FLAMIN HOT downunder just now :eek: ... and by cripes when it gets hot its just too damned hot to put long strides on chaps on bloody thick shirts on plus plus plus :rolleyes: ...I say well done Ian Paul and mates :cool:

Great lookin wood and man Ive got me a hankerin to have one of those Lucus Mills one day... ripsnorter of a peice of machinery!! ;)

Edited to add... dont boat trailers make aweflaminsome timber movein trailers?!! :D

[ 12-25-2003, 03:31 AM: Message edited by: Wild Dingo ]

Wild Dingo
12-25-2003, 03:30 AM
I do believe if you look at that first pic the fella with the chainsaw does indeed have safety boots on... and perhaps even saftey glasses but I cant be sure since the picture isnt of his face nor even really close... safety specs do nowadays look very much the same as a good pair of sunglasses.

Now the fella doin the millin has I believe a saftey face shield on along with the boots which I have no doubt would be steel capped at least...

These fellas are damned saftey up the wazooo compared to many professional millers Ive watched one of whom wore thongs and shorts nothing else! but had been cuttin and millin timber for many many years and knew EXACTLY where his next cut would be and what the timber would do and what was happenin around him... I believe Bob is right in knowing what your doin and makin sure you are aware at all times of potential problems so you can act without thinkin to save your bum in a bad situation... or someone elses if need be... but accidents WILL happen regardless of the amount of safety gear one uses.

Ooooh and its gettin FLAMIN HOT downunder just now :eek: ... and by cripes when it gets hot its just too damned hot to put long strides on chaps on bloody thick shirts on plus plus plus :rolleyes: ...I say well done Ian Paul and mates :cool:

Great lookin wood and man Ive got me a hankerin to have one of those Lucus Mills one day... ripsnorter of a peice of machinery!! ;)

Edited to add... dont boat trailers make aweflaminsome timber movein trailers?!! :D

[ 12-25-2003, 03:31 AM: Message edited by: Wild Dingo ]

formerlyknownasprince
01-06-2004, 04:27 AM
I promised a photo of the safe way to do the cut so ...

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid97/p26c6636aea926b0d09cf6b54b60e7a3f/fa0c8773.jpg

The top of the "orange slice" is at right angles to the trunk, with the next cut angled. Paul then uses a twig stuck in the "V" to allow him to line up the final cut - which is about 3" above the level of the "V" cut. This leaves a step on the opposite side of the stump and prevents the tree sliding out in that direction.

Ian

formerlyknownasprince
01-06-2004, 04:27 AM
I promised a photo of the safe way to do the cut so ...

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid97/p26c6636aea926b0d09cf6b54b60e7a3f/fa0c8773.jpg

The top of the "orange slice" is at right angles to the trunk, with the next cut angled. Paul then uses a twig stuck in the "V" to allow him to line up the final cut - which is about 3" above the level of the "V" cut. This leaves a step on the opposite side of the stump and prevents the tree sliding out in that direction.

Ian

formerlyknownasprince
01-06-2004, 04:27 AM
I promised a photo of the safe way to do the cut so ...

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid97/p26c6636aea926b0d09cf6b54b60e7a3f/fa0c8773.jpg

The top of the "orange slice" is at right angles to the trunk, with the next cut angled. Paul then uses a twig stuck in the "V" to allow him to line up the final cut - which is about 3" above the level of the "V" cut. This leaves a step on the opposite side of the stump and prevents the tree sliding out in that direction.

Ian