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Scott Rosen
11-22-2000, 11:19 AM
My wife has cleared the way for me to get a band saw. She's prepared to live with a cost of between $600 to $700. Now, I know that will get me a decent bandsaw. But I'm thinking that maybe I could get a smaller bandsaw and have enough money left over for a small tablesaw or drill press.

If you had $600 to spend on those essential shop tools, how would you spend it?

Scott Rosen
11-22-2000, 11:19 AM
My wife has cleared the way for me to get a band saw. She's prepared to live with a cost of between $600 to $700. Now, I know that will get me a decent bandsaw. But I'm thinking that maybe I could get a smaller bandsaw and have enough money left over for a small tablesaw or drill press.

If you had $600 to spend on those essential shop tools, how would you spend it?

Scott Rosen
11-22-2000, 11:19 AM
My wife has cleared the way for me to get a band saw. She's prepared to live with a cost of between $600 to $700. Now, I know that will get me a decent bandsaw. But I'm thinking that maybe I could get a smaller bandsaw and have enough money left over for a small tablesaw or drill press.

If you had $600 to spend on those essential shop tools, how would you spend it?

Wayne Jeffers
11-22-2000, 12:31 PM
Tough call, Scott. For my money, a table saw is the one most useful power tool, but I already have a good one. I've been wanting a thickness planer but haven't yet seen fit to spend the money for one. (I have several hundred board feet of walnut and cherry that has air dried for several years and ideas of using it for furniture, mostly.) If I decide to strip-plank or cold-mold a hull, I will almost certainly buy a band saw to get the most out of the stock I would be re-sawing.

I guess the answer lies mostly in the type of work you want to do, predominately. I think a table saw is the most versatile, but for special requirements, you may get more benefit from another tool. What kind of work would you do, mostly?

I have a prejudice in favor of buying only better quality tools, so I urge you not to try to stretch your money too far by buying tools that may be too lightly constructed for your needs. Sometimes it is possible to find good deals on used woodworking tools. Estate sales can be a gold mine in this regard.

Enjoy!

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
11-22-2000, 12:31 PM
Tough call, Scott. For my money, a table saw is the one most useful power tool, but I already have a good one. I've been wanting a thickness planer but haven't yet seen fit to spend the money for one. (I have several hundred board feet of walnut and cherry that has air dried for several years and ideas of using it for furniture, mostly.) If I decide to strip-plank or cold-mold a hull, I will almost certainly buy a band saw to get the most out of the stock I would be re-sawing.

I guess the answer lies mostly in the type of work you want to do, predominately. I think a table saw is the most versatile, but for special requirements, you may get more benefit from another tool. What kind of work would you do, mostly?

I have a prejudice in favor of buying only better quality tools, so I urge you not to try to stretch your money too far by buying tools that may be too lightly constructed for your needs. Sometimes it is possible to find good deals on used woodworking tools. Estate sales can be a gold mine in this regard.

Enjoy!

Wayne

Wayne Jeffers
11-22-2000, 12:31 PM
Tough call, Scott. For my money, a table saw is the one most useful power tool, but I already have a good one. I've been wanting a thickness planer but haven't yet seen fit to spend the money for one. (I have several hundred board feet of walnut and cherry that has air dried for several years and ideas of using it for furniture, mostly.) If I decide to strip-plank or cold-mold a hull, I will almost certainly buy a band saw to get the most out of the stock I would be re-sawing.

I guess the answer lies mostly in the type of work you want to do, predominately. I think a table saw is the most versatile, but for special requirements, you may get more benefit from another tool. What kind of work would you do, mostly?

I have a prejudice in favor of buying only better quality tools, so I urge you not to try to stretch your money too far by buying tools that may be too lightly constructed for your needs. Sometimes it is possible to find good deals on used woodworking tools. Estate sales can be a gold mine in this regard.

Enjoy!

Wayne

abe
11-22-2000, 12:40 PM
Scott, You can't go wrong with a 14 inch bandsaw. I would not be happy with a smaller unit.

My kids gave me the Jet saw as a retirement gift. Took about 4 hours to assemble and another 2 to set up. I now use it almost daily and should have sprung for it many years ago.

Get the mobile base unit, and place in a corner for the night. All this for under $600.

As for a table saw, the wish list calls for at least the Delta contractors unit. But that can wait until I retire from my next career. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Abe

PS Have you received approval from the family to consider that barn/shop we talked about at Mystic?

abe
11-22-2000, 12:40 PM
Scott, You can't go wrong with a 14 inch bandsaw. I would not be happy with a smaller unit.

My kids gave me the Jet saw as a retirement gift. Took about 4 hours to assemble and another 2 to set up. I now use it almost daily and should have sprung for it many years ago.

Get the mobile base unit, and place in a corner for the night. All this for under $600.

As for a table saw, the wish list calls for at least the Delta contractors unit. But that can wait until I retire from my next career. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Abe

PS Have you received approval from the family to consider that barn/shop we talked about at Mystic?

abe
11-22-2000, 12:40 PM
Scott, You can't go wrong with a 14 inch bandsaw. I would not be happy with a smaller unit.

My kids gave me the Jet saw as a retirement gift. Took about 4 hours to assemble and another 2 to set up. I now use it almost daily and should have sprung for it many years ago.

Get the mobile base unit, and place in a corner for the night. All this for under $600.

As for a table saw, the wish list calls for at least the Delta contractors unit. But that can wait until I retire from my next career. http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Abe

PS Have you received approval from the family to consider that barn/shop we talked about at Mystic?

Jim Hillman
11-22-2000, 01:26 PM
Scott, I buy my lumber random and re-saw it, I have a cheap 10 in. table saw for the re-sawing, but I have to finish it to spec. by hand. If I had the extra cash I'd spring for a thickness planer.

Jim

Jim Hillman
11-22-2000, 01:26 PM
Scott, I buy my lumber random and re-saw it, I have a cheap 10 in. table saw for the re-sawing, but I have to finish it to spec. by hand. If I had the extra cash I'd spring for a thickness planer.

Jim

Jim Hillman
11-22-2000, 01:26 PM
Scott, I buy my lumber random and re-saw it, I have a cheap 10 in. table saw for the re-sawing, but I have to finish it to spec. by hand. If I had the extra cash I'd spring for a thickness planer.

Jim

Keith Wilson
11-22-2000, 04:08 PM
I have the 12" Jet bandsaw, and have been very happy with it. It has been large enough for anything I've wanted to do with it so far. The entire frame, top and bottom, is one single iron casting. Motor is 1/2 HP TEFC. It's almost as heavy as their 14" saw and is a lot cheaper; I bought mine for $275. That would leave you a lot of extra money to play with. See http://www.jettools.com/

For what it's worth, I think a table saw would be much much more useful than a drill press.

Keith Wilson
11-22-2000, 04:08 PM
I have the 12" Jet bandsaw, and have been very happy with it. It has been large enough for anything I've wanted to do with it so far. The entire frame, top and bottom, is one single iron casting. Motor is 1/2 HP TEFC. It's almost as heavy as their 14" saw and is a lot cheaper; I bought mine for $275. That would leave you a lot of extra money to play with. See http://www.jettools.com/

For what it's worth, I think a table saw would be much much more useful than a drill press.

Keith Wilson
11-22-2000, 04:08 PM
I have the 12" Jet bandsaw, and have been very happy with it. It has been large enough for anything I've wanted to do with it so far. The entire frame, top and bottom, is one single iron casting. Motor is 1/2 HP TEFC. It's almost as heavy as their 14" saw and is a lot cheaper; I bought mine for $275. That would leave you a lot of extra money to play with. See http://www.jettools.com/

For what it's worth, I think a table saw would be much much more useful than a drill press.

Mitch Larsen
11-22-2000, 04:22 PM
I don't think you can go wrong with a good 500 dollar band saw. The trick is to buy the appropriate thank you gift for your wife with the remaining 100 dollars

Mitch Larsen
11-22-2000, 04:22 PM
I don't think you can go wrong with a good 500 dollar band saw. The trick is to buy the appropriate thank you gift for your wife with the remaining 100 dollars

Mitch Larsen
11-22-2000, 04:22 PM
I don't think you can go wrong with a good 500 dollar band saw. The trick is to buy the appropriate thank you gift for your wife with the remaining 100 dollars

Ed Harrow
11-23-2000, 11:00 AM
ROTFLMHO, Mitch, that is priceless!

Scott, the 14" Delta is the standard; take a look through all the various catalogs and note all the stuff made for them (and, yes, a few others). If you ever want to do any amount of resawing, the 14" Delta, and Jet, I think, are the only ones that offer a height kit. You ought to have a look for used stuff, or you might be really lucky like me (for once) and be given an antique 14" Delta.

One other bit about the Delta, the lower guide blocks are right below the table, providing better blade control.

I do have a solution to your quandry, simply send me the $500. I'll find a good use for
it, and send your wife $150 to boot!

Ed Harrow
11-23-2000, 11:00 AM
ROTFLMHO, Mitch, that is priceless!

Scott, the 14" Delta is the standard; take a look through all the various catalogs and note all the stuff made for them (and, yes, a few others). If you ever want to do any amount of resawing, the 14" Delta, and Jet, I think, are the only ones that offer a height kit. You ought to have a look for used stuff, or you might be really lucky like me (for once) and be given an antique 14" Delta.

One other bit about the Delta, the lower guide blocks are right below the table, providing better blade control.

I do have a solution to your quandry, simply send me the $500. I'll find a good use for
it, and send your wife $150 to boot!

Ed Harrow
11-23-2000, 11:00 AM
ROTFLMHO, Mitch, that is priceless!

Scott, the 14" Delta is the standard; take a look through all the various catalogs and note all the stuff made for them (and, yes, a few others). If you ever want to do any amount of resawing, the 14" Delta, and Jet, I think, are the only ones that offer a height kit. You ought to have a look for used stuff, or you might be really lucky like me (for once) and be given an antique 14" Delta.

One other bit about the Delta, the lower guide blocks are right below the table, providing better blade control.

I do have a solution to your quandry, simply send me the $500. I'll find a good use for
it, and send your wife $150 to boot!

Bob Cleek
11-23-2000, 04:04 PM
I find the 14" bandsaw gets a lot more use than the table saw. The set up is zip, compared to the table saw and, perhaps it's just a fantasy, but I don't worry about fingers flying across the shop before I know they are gone with the bandsaw like I do with the tablesaw. I'd say you'd have to have both, though. I don't see much point in putting a lot of money into "accuracy" on the bandsaw, since it is a free hand exercise anyway. Put your techno-bucks into a good fence and miter on the tablesaw.

I'm still surviving with a 1950's Craftsman eight inch table saw... sigh. I wonder, should I continue to lust after the Delta/Jet Unisaws or settle for their 10" contractor's table saw with the Beisemeyer type fence system? Is the additional eight hundred bucks worth it for the Unisaw?

Used tools are definitely worth looking for. I got my Delta/Rockwell 16" stationary thickness planer for $500. My 14" bandsaw cost me $100. Guys buy these things and then lose interest... after a while, they let them go. Our gain!

Inquiring minds want to know!

[This message has been edited by Bob Cleek (edited 11-23-2000).]

Bob Cleek
11-23-2000, 04:04 PM
I find the 14" bandsaw gets a lot more use than the table saw. The set up is zip, compared to the table saw and, perhaps it's just a fantasy, but I don't worry about fingers flying across the shop before I know they are gone with the bandsaw like I do with the tablesaw. I'd say you'd have to have both, though. I don't see much point in putting a lot of money into "accuracy" on the bandsaw, since it is a free hand exercise anyway. Put your techno-bucks into a good fence and miter on the tablesaw.

I'm still surviving with a 1950's Craftsman eight inch table saw... sigh. I wonder, should I continue to lust after the Delta/Jet Unisaws or settle for their 10" contractor's table saw with the Beisemeyer type fence system? Is the additional eight hundred bucks worth it for the Unisaw?

Used tools are definitely worth looking for. I got my Delta/Rockwell 16" stationary thickness planer for $500. My 14" bandsaw cost me $100. Guys buy these things and then lose interest... after a while, they let them go. Our gain!

Inquiring minds want to know!

[This message has been edited by Bob Cleek (edited 11-23-2000).]

Bob Cleek
11-23-2000, 04:04 PM
I find the 14" bandsaw gets a lot more use than the table saw. The set up is zip, compared to the table saw and, perhaps it's just a fantasy, but I don't worry about fingers flying across the shop before I know they are gone with the bandsaw like I do with the tablesaw. I'd say you'd have to have both, though. I don't see much point in putting a lot of money into "accuracy" on the bandsaw, since it is a free hand exercise anyway. Put your techno-bucks into a good fence and miter on the tablesaw.

I'm still surviving with a 1950's Craftsman eight inch table saw... sigh. I wonder, should I continue to lust after the Delta/Jet Unisaws or settle for their 10" contractor's table saw with the Beisemeyer type fence system? Is the additional eight hundred bucks worth it for the Unisaw?

Used tools are definitely worth looking for. I got my Delta/Rockwell 16" stationary thickness planer for $500. My 14" bandsaw cost me $100. Guys buy these things and then lose interest... after a while, they let them go. Our gain!

Inquiring minds want to know!

[This message has been edited by Bob Cleek (edited 11-23-2000).]

NormMessinger
11-24-2000, 02:42 PM
Just to add to the confusion: I have an Inca 10" band saw. However I find I get less waste resawing with a thin kerf blade on the 10" table Saw (a 1940's Atlas) than I do with the bandsaw and thickness planer.

You're gonna need a Bosch saber saw to cut out all the moldes for your Haven 12.5 unless you can get SWMBO to move the decimal point one to the right for your band saw allowance.

--Norm

NormMessinger
11-24-2000, 02:42 PM
Just to add to the confusion: I have an Inca 10" band saw. However I find I get less waste resawing with a thin kerf blade on the 10" table Saw (a 1940's Atlas) than I do with the bandsaw and thickness planer.

You're gonna need a Bosch saber saw to cut out all the moldes for your Haven 12.5 unless you can get SWMBO to move the decimal point one to the right for your band saw allowance.

--Norm

NormMessinger
11-24-2000, 02:42 PM
Just to add to the confusion: I have an Inca 10" band saw. However I find I get less waste resawing with a thin kerf blade on the 10" table Saw (a 1940's Atlas) than I do with the bandsaw and thickness planer.

You're gonna need a Bosch saber saw to cut out all the moldes for your Haven 12.5 unless you can get SWMBO to move the decimal point one to the right for your band saw allowance.

--Norm

Ross Faneuf
11-25-2000, 11:02 PM
I understand why Bob says he worries less about the band saw - but we should all be aware of the statistics (as I recall them from a series of shop safety articles Fine Woodworking did a few years ago). And statistically, the band saw is more dangerous than the band saw, and accounts for more hand injuries than any other stationary power tool. The reason is that it seems so much more innocent - it's quiet. But it will clip off fingers at exactly the same rate as a table saw, that is, as fast as you feed them in.

That said, I'll chime in on the side of a good 14" band saw - and indispensable tool. And don't forget you may want to reserve some money for accessories - you'll want at least 1/2 dozen spare and alternate width blades, I would invest in Cool blocks guides, and make sure you can hook it up to some kind of dust collector. The nice thing about band saws is that a shop vac will work well if you don't have a dust collector system, and many band saws come with an appropriate sized hookup.

Ross Faneuf
11-25-2000, 11:02 PM
I understand why Bob says he worries less about the band saw - but we should all be aware of the statistics (as I recall them from a series of shop safety articles Fine Woodworking did a few years ago). And statistically, the band saw is more dangerous than the band saw, and accounts for more hand injuries than any other stationary power tool. The reason is that it seems so much more innocent - it's quiet. But it will clip off fingers at exactly the same rate as a table saw, that is, as fast as you feed them in.

That said, I'll chime in on the side of a good 14" band saw - and indispensable tool. And don't forget you may want to reserve some money for accessories - you'll want at least 1/2 dozen spare and alternate width blades, I would invest in Cool blocks guides, and make sure you can hook it up to some kind of dust collector. The nice thing about band saws is that a shop vac will work well if you don't have a dust collector system, and many band saws come with an appropriate sized hookup.

Ross Faneuf
11-25-2000, 11:02 PM
I understand why Bob says he worries less about the band saw - but we should all be aware of the statistics (as I recall them from a series of shop safety articles Fine Woodworking did a few years ago). And statistically, the band saw is more dangerous than the band saw, and accounts for more hand injuries than any other stationary power tool. The reason is that it seems so much more innocent - it's quiet. But it will clip off fingers at exactly the same rate as a table saw, that is, as fast as you feed them in.

That said, I'll chime in on the side of a good 14" band saw - and indispensable tool. And don't forget you may want to reserve some money for accessories - you'll want at least 1/2 dozen spare and alternate width blades, I would invest in Cool blocks guides, and make sure you can hook it up to some kind of dust collector. The nice thing about band saws is that a shop vac will work well if you don't have a dust collector system, and many band saws come with an appropriate sized hookup.

Tom Lathrop
11-26-2000, 10:14 AM
Love my bandsaw Scott, but if I only could have one major tool, it would have to be the tablesaw. After a couple of cheaper ones, I finally got a Unisaw with the Unifence and love it. My method of buying tools has been to get the tool when a job comes along that requires it. The wife takes the finished project and never complains about the money spent on the tool.

A friend gave me a Grizzly 18" bandsaw and though I've worked on it a few times, it still is not a good tool. The old 12" Sears does a better job up to 6" thick. One day I'll get out Duginski's book and work on it till it either runs right or is sold. I had a 14" copy of the Delta and it worked well but I managed to break the table trunions and the upper wheel support doing work too heavy for it. On imports, many parts are made of heavy cast iron but much of the critical working parts are cast of pot metal. They don't take much abuse.

Someone mentioned dust collection. Most bandsaws can be rigged to collect dust very well but tablesaws are a problem. The chips that go down into the table are can be collected easily, but much dust will fly directly off the saw toward you and the floor. Unless you use a collection cover over the blade (I don't like them) the stuff is going to fly.

One help is to install a riving knife behind the blade to help keep the back teeth of the blade from striking the work on the way up. The fence should also be adjusted so that the back teeth are a few thousanths further from the fence than the front teeth. This will make a more accurate cut, less dust and most importantly, reduce the chance of a dangerous kickback.

I saw the safety report on shop tools that said the bandsaw had more injuries to the hands than the tablesaw but have a hard time believing it. If they counted minor nicks, maybe they are right, but most injuries on the tablesaw are not MINOR. A motor of adequate power (one that will not stall or slow appreciably in the cut), SHARP blades, feather boards and push sticks, along with good habits will minimize the danger.

NEVER, EVER, under ANY circumstances, reach over the running blade to move or extract an offcut. If the blade should grab (touching the offcut is the best way to make it grab), no one has reactions fast enough to avoid having the hands dragged into the blade. Most of the missing fingers went this way.

Didn't mean to rant on about safety, but got to going and decided to leave it in.

Tom Lathrop
11-26-2000, 10:14 AM
Love my bandsaw Scott, but if I only could have one major tool, it would have to be the tablesaw. After a couple of cheaper ones, I finally got a Unisaw with the Unifence and love it. My method of buying tools has been to get the tool when a job comes along that requires it. The wife takes the finished project and never complains about the money spent on the tool.

A friend gave me a Grizzly 18" bandsaw and though I've worked on it a few times, it still is not a good tool. The old 12" Sears does a better job up to 6" thick. One day I'll get out Duginski's book and work on it till it either runs right or is sold. I had a 14" copy of the Delta and it worked well but I managed to break the table trunions and the upper wheel support doing work too heavy for it. On imports, many parts are made of heavy cast iron but much of the critical working parts are cast of pot metal. They don't take much abuse.

Someone mentioned dust collection. Most bandsaws can be rigged to collect dust very well but tablesaws are a problem. The chips that go down into the table are can be collected easily, but much dust will fly directly off the saw toward you and the floor. Unless you use a collection cover over the blade (I don't like them) the stuff is going to fly.

One help is to install a riving knife behind the blade to help keep the back teeth of the blade from striking the work on the way up. The fence should also be adjusted so that the back teeth are a few thousanths further from the fence than the front teeth. This will make a more accurate cut, less dust and most importantly, reduce the chance of a dangerous kickback.

I saw the safety report on shop tools that said the bandsaw had more injuries to the hands than the tablesaw but have a hard time believing it. If they counted minor nicks, maybe they are right, but most injuries on the tablesaw are not MINOR. A motor of adequate power (one that will not stall or slow appreciably in the cut), SHARP blades, feather boards and push sticks, along with good habits will minimize the danger.

NEVER, EVER, under ANY circumstances, reach over the running blade to move or extract an offcut. If the blade should grab (touching the offcut is the best way to make it grab), no one has reactions fast enough to avoid having the hands dragged into the blade. Most of the missing fingers went this way.

Didn't mean to rant on about safety, but got to going and decided to leave it in.

Tom Lathrop
11-26-2000, 10:14 AM
Love my bandsaw Scott, but if I only could have one major tool, it would have to be the tablesaw. After a couple of cheaper ones, I finally got a Unisaw with the Unifence and love it. My method of buying tools has been to get the tool when a job comes along that requires it. The wife takes the finished project and never complains about the money spent on the tool.

A friend gave me a Grizzly 18" bandsaw and though I've worked on it a few times, it still is not a good tool. The old 12" Sears does a better job up to 6" thick. One day I'll get out Duginski's book and work on it till it either runs right or is sold. I had a 14" copy of the Delta and it worked well but I managed to break the table trunions and the upper wheel support doing work too heavy for it. On imports, many parts are made of heavy cast iron but much of the critical working parts are cast of pot metal. They don't take much abuse.

Someone mentioned dust collection. Most bandsaws can be rigged to collect dust very well but tablesaws are a problem. The chips that go down into the table are can be collected easily, but much dust will fly directly off the saw toward you and the floor. Unless you use a collection cover over the blade (I don't like them) the stuff is going to fly.

One help is to install a riving knife behind the blade to help keep the back teeth of the blade from striking the work on the way up. The fence should also be adjusted so that the back teeth are a few thousanths further from the fence than the front teeth. This will make a more accurate cut, less dust and most importantly, reduce the chance of a dangerous kickback.

I saw the safety report on shop tools that said the bandsaw had more injuries to the hands than the tablesaw but have a hard time believing it. If they counted minor nicks, maybe they are right, but most injuries on the tablesaw are not MINOR. A motor of adequate power (one that will not stall or slow appreciably in the cut), SHARP blades, feather boards and push sticks, along with good habits will minimize the danger.

NEVER, EVER, under ANY circumstances, reach over the running blade to move or extract an offcut. If the blade should grab (touching the offcut is the best way to make it grab), no one has reactions fast enough to avoid having the hands dragged into the blade. Most of the missing fingers went this way.

Didn't mean to rant on about safety, but got to going and decided to leave it in.

wandiwise
11-26-2000, 05:24 PM
No one has mentioned the router/router table, on which a lot of the work done on a bandsaw and even table saw can be done, and possibly better. That's definitely my next acquisition.

Thanks to advice received here on this forum, and from a N.A. friend who uses one himself, my table saw is a Delta Model 36-630. Truth to tell, I'm petrified of that monster. The Forest blade is wonderful, but one must cross the line of attack of the blade to reach beneath the front of the machine to turn it off, and I hate having to bend below the table to reach across (under) and even duck my head down there in case something lets fly. Brrrrrr!

Years ago I had a Craftsman table saw - forget which size/model - and that thing couldn't cut a straight line if hell froze over, as the blade would just wander at will.

So, what won't get done with the table saw or router or electric drill or Fein sander will just have to be whittled with hand tools.

www

wandiwise
11-26-2000, 05:24 PM
No one has mentioned the router/router table, on which a lot of the work done on a bandsaw and even table saw can be done, and possibly better. That's definitely my next acquisition.

Thanks to advice received here on this forum, and from a N.A. friend who uses one himself, my table saw is a Delta Model 36-630. Truth to tell, I'm petrified of that monster. The Forest blade is wonderful, but one must cross the line of attack of the blade to reach beneath the front of the machine to turn it off, and I hate having to bend below the table to reach across (under) and even duck my head down there in case something lets fly. Brrrrrr!

Years ago I had a Craftsman table saw - forget which size/model - and that thing couldn't cut a straight line if hell froze over, as the blade would just wander at will.

So, what won't get done with the table saw or router or electric drill or Fein sander will just have to be whittled with hand tools.

www

wandiwise
11-26-2000, 05:24 PM
No one has mentioned the router/router table, on which a lot of the work done on a bandsaw and even table saw can be done, and possibly better. That's definitely my next acquisition.

Thanks to advice received here on this forum, and from a N.A. friend who uses one himself, my table saw is a Delta Model 36-630. Truth to tell, I'm petrified of that monster. The Forest blade is wonderful, but one must cross the line of attack of the blade to reach beneath the front of the machine to turn it off, and I hate having to bend below the table to reach across (under) and even duck my head down there in case something lets fly. Brrrrrr!

Years ago I had a Craftsman table saw - forget which size/model - and that thing couldn't cut a straight line if hell froze over, as the blade would just wander at will.

So, what won't get done with the table saw or router or electric drill or Fein sander will just have to be whittled with hand tools.

www

Tom Lathrop
11-26-2000, 09:57 PM
Wandiwise,

You are so right about that switch. Why Delta put it there is beyond me. The cable they provide is not long enough to move it to the other side and my good intentions to rewire it have been just intentions, so far. Greatest trouble is to start the thing when you have a 4X8 sheet of ply ready to cut. My plan is to put the switch on the left side of the table and add a foot operated shut-off. Hope I don't wait till after there is a problem.

It pays to treat power tools with respect, but when I start to get nervous, I go and work on something else with less potential for maiming me.

Tom Lathrop
11-26-2000, 09:57 PM
Wandiwise,

You are so right about that switch. Why Delta put it there is beyond me. The cable they provide is not long enough to move it to the other side and my good intentions to rewire it have been just intentions, so far. Greatest trouble is to start the thing when you have a 4X8 sheet of ply ready to cut. My plan is to put the switch on the left side of the table and add a foot operated shut-off. Hope I don't wait till after there is a problem.

It pays to treat power tools with respect, but when I start to get nervous, I go and work on something else with less potential for maiming me.

Tom Lathrop
11-26-2000, 09:57 PM
Wandiwise,

You are so right about that switch. Why Delta put it there is beyond me. The cable they provide is not long enough to move it to the other side and my good intentions to rewire it have been just intentions, so far. Greatest trouble is to start the thing when you have a 4X8 sheet of ply ready to cut. My plan is to put the switch on the left side of the table and add a foot operated shut-off. Hope I don't wait till after there is a problem.

It pays to treat power tools with respect, but when I start to get nervous, I go and work on something else with less potential for maiming me.

jeffery
11-27-2000, 06:32 AM
Tom
Glad you left the safty rant in. my mistake was trying to cut on the back side of the blade luckly I still have me fingers but it was pure luck. started to think about it and got sick so I will d=not write details. In out college shop there was a sheet metal flue on the wall 25 feet infront of the table saw. there were three ( or more) heavy impact craters and several minor ones level with the table. a band saw doesn't kick back. repete this mantra " I will not push my fingers through the blade"

the table saw is the first and all around tool and I think that every job it does can be done better safer and faster by the proper special purpose tool.

Intestingly since they are so popular they make them biger and stronger and sheeper than other tools. I'd love to see a three horse 48 inch wide by 4.5 inch deep ( or more) band saw for $500 like you see with the table saws

will second the idea on the router table.

best wishes
jeffery

jeffery
11-27-2000, 06:32 AM
Tom
Glad you left the safty rant in. my mistake was trying to cut on the back side of the blade luckly I still have me fingers but it was pure luck. started to think about it and got sick so I will d=not write details. In out college shop there was a sheet metal flue on the wall 25 feet infront of the table saw. there were three ( or more) heavy impact craters and several minor ones level with the table. a band saw doesn't kick back. repete this mantra " I will not push my fingers through the blade"

the table saw is the first and all around tool and I think that every job it does can be done better safer and faster by the proper special purpose tool.

Intestingly since they are so popular they make them biger and stronger and sheeper than other tools. I'd love to see a three horse 48 inch wide by 4.5 inch deep ( or more) band saw for $500 like you see with the table saws

will second the idea on the router table.

best wishes
jeffery

jeffery
11-27-2000, 06:32 AM
Tom
Glad you left the safty rant in. my mistake was trying to cut on the back side of the blade luckly I still have me fingers but it was pure luck. started to think about it and got sick so I will d=not write details. In out college shop there was a sheet metal flue on the wall 25 feet infront of the table saw. there were three ( or more) heavy impact craters and several minor ones level with the table. a band saw doesn't kick back. repete this mantra " I will not push my fingers through the blade"

the table saw is the first and all around tool and I think that every job it does can be done better safer and faster by the proper special purpose tool.

Intestingly since they are so popular they make them biger and stronger and sheeper than other tools. I'd love to see a three horse 48 inch wide by 4.5 inch deep ( or more) band saw for $500 like you see with the table saws

will second the idea on the router table.

best wishes
jeffery

Scott Rosen
11-27-2000, 05:56 PM
Thank you all for the great input on this.

There are many reasons to choose either a band saw or a table saw, and all of the good suggestions here only make the decision more difficult.

I think I'm going to get the band saw. It was Tom's comment that convinced me. Tom, even though you find the table saw more useful, your comment that you buy tools as the need arises hit home with me. My next big project will be building a cold molded hull for a Haven 12 1/2. Cutting the molds and resawing all of the veneer for cold molding requires a band saw. Without a band saw, I might be able to cut the molds by hand or with a hand-held sabre saw (which I have), but I'd never be able to resaw the veneer, and I don't want to pay someone else to do it for me. I just don't see how I could do that work with a table saw. I'll get a good fence and mitre gauge, of course, so I will be able to use it for square cuts--anyhow, it can't be any less accurate for square cuts than my present method: marking and sawing by hand.

So, is it worth it spring for the Delta 14" or would the Jet 14" be just as good?

Scott Rosen
11-27-2000, 05:56 PM
Thank you all for the great input on this.

There are many reasons to choose either a band saw or a table saw, and all of the good suggestions here only make the decision more difficult.

I think I'm going to get the band saw. It was Tom's comment that convinced me. Tom, even though you find the table saw more useful, your comment that you buy tools as the need arises hit home with me. My next big project will be building a cold molded hull for a Haven 12 1/2. Cutting the molds and resawing all of the veneer for cold molding requires a band saw. Without a band saw, I might be able to cut the molds by hand or with a hand-held sabre saw (which I have), but I'd never be able to resaw the veneer, and I don't want to pay someone else to do it for me. I just don't see how I could do that work with a table saw. I'll get a good fence and mitre gauge, of course, so I will be able to use it for square cuts--anyhow, it can't be any less accurate for square cuts than my present method: marking and sawing by hand.

So, is it worth it spring for the Delta 14" or would the Jet 14" be just as good?

Scott Rosen
11-27-2000, 05:56 PM
Thank you all for the great input on this.

There are many reasons to choose either a band saw or a table saw, and all of the good suggestions here only make the decision more difficult.

I think I'm going to get the band saw. It was Tom's comment that convinced me. Tom, even though you find the table saw more useful, your comment that you buy tools as the need arises hit home with me. My next big project will be building a cold molded hull for a Haven 12 1/2. Cutting the molds and resawing all of the veneer for cold molding requires a band saw. Without a band saw, I might be able to cut the molds by hand or with a hand-held sabre saw (which I have), but I'd never be able to resaw the veneer, and I don't want to pay someone else to do it for me. I just don't see how I could do that work with a table saw. I'll get a good fence and mitre gauge, of course, so I will be able to use it for square cuts--anyhow, it can't be any less accurate for square cuts than my present method: marking and sawing by hand.

So, is it worth it spring for the Delta 14" or would the Jet 14" be just as good?

Tom Lathrop
11-27-2000, 08:25 PM
Scott,

The first thing you should buy is a good book on bandsaws. I have the one by mark Duginski and like it very much, but there are others that may be just as good. One of the first things you will find out is that the blade almost never tracks parallel to the miter gauge slot. The reasons are explained in the book but the result is that the fence must be set to match the track of the blade. As a result most fences that come with bandsaws are no good for thick resawing. Best thing is to make your own so that is can be as high as the board being cut and can be aligned to the blade and clamped to the table. Don't forget a good flexible light with a magnetic base so that the cut can be illuminated. Highland Hardware's wood slicer blades are worth the money for veneer making or thick resawing.

As for the Jet versus Delta, it depends on the money, or lack of. I have a Jet 6" jointer and know it is inferior to the Delta although, with a couple of bearings, belts and shims, it has run well for 15 years. The Chinese copies used to be made by using Delta parts as molds for casting, so they can be very similar. As I said before, look out for inferior pot metal parts. I suspect that Jet does a better job of quality control on their imported tools than most. My Unisaw was made in Brazil and seems fine.

By the way, Jet now owns Powermatic and Performax.

Tom Lathrop
11-27-2000, 08:25 PM
Scott,

The first thing you should buy is a good book on bandsaws. I have the one by mark Duginski and like it very much, but there are others that may be just as good. One of the first things you will find out is that the blade almost never tracks parallel to the miter gauge slot. The reasons are explained in the book but the result is that the fence must be set to match the track of the blade. As a result most fences that come with bandsaws are no good for thick resawing. Best thing is to make your own so that is can be as high as the board being cut and can be aligned to the blade and clamped to the table. Don't forget a good flexible light with a magnetic base so that the cut can be illuminated. Highland Hardware's wood slicer blades are worth the money for veneer making or thick resawing.

As for the Jet versus Delta, it depends on the money, or lack of. I have a Jet 6" jointer and know it is inferior to the Delta although, with a couple of bearings, belts and shims, it has run well for 15 years. The Chinese copies used to be made by using Delta parts as molds for casting, so they can be very similar. As I said before, look out for inferior pot metal parts. I suspect that Jet does a better job of quality control on their imported tools than most. My Unisaw was made in Brazil and seems fine.

By the way, Jet now owns Powermatic and Performax.

Tom Lathrop
11-27-2000, 08:25 PM
Scott,

The first thing you should buy is a good book on bandsaws. I have the one by mark Duginski and like it very much, but there are others that may be just as good. One of the first things you will find out is that the blade almost never tracks parallel to the miter gauge slot. The reasons are explained in the book but the result is that the fence must be set to match the track of the blade. As a result most fences that come with bandsaws are no good for thick resawing. Best thing is to make your own so that is can be as high as the board being cut and can be aligned to the blade and clamped to the table. Don't forget a good flexible light with a magnetic base so that the cut can be illuminated. Highland Hardware's wood slicer blades are worth the money for veneer making or thick resawing.

As for the Jet versus Delta, it depends on the money, or lack of. I have a Jet 6" jointer and know it is inferior to the Delta although, with a couple of bearings, belts and shims, it has run well for 15 years. The Chinese copies used to be made by using Delta parts as molds for casting, so they can be very similar. As I said before, look out for inferior pot metal parts. I suspect that Jet does a better job of quality control on their imported tools than most. My Unisaw was made in Brazil and seems fine.

By the way, Jet now owns Powermatic and Performax.

abe
11-27-2000, 09:23 PM
Scott,
As said earlier, I am happy with the Jet. Found the Jet assembly instructions complete and set-up was a snap.

If you want to travel for a couple hours Scott, your welcome to test drive the unit. Bring along some ply, and you can start those molds!

Andy A.

abe
11-27-2000, 09:23 PM
Scott,
As said earlier, I am happy with the Jet. Found the Jet assembly instructions complete and set-up was a snap.

If you want to travel for a couple hours Scott, your welcome to test drive the unit. Bring along some ply, and you can start those molds!

Andy A.

abe
11-27-2000, 09:23 PM
Scott,
As said earlier, I am happy with the Jet. Found the Jet assembly instructions complete and set-up was a snap.

If you want to travel for a couple hours Scott, your welcome to test drive the unit. Bring along some ply, and you can start those molds!

Andy A.

John058
11-27-2000, 10:15 PM
...as for Jet vs Delta...what was true yesterday may no longer be valid...seems that there's a whole bunch of Delta jointers out there with inferior castings now that they've gone offshore...most of the woodworker forums report Jet's quality control to be superior....'course all this is subject to manual recount http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

John058
11-27-2000, 10:15 PM
...as for Jet vs Delta...what was true yesterday may no longer be valid...seems that there's a whole bunch of Delta jointers out there with inferior castings now that they've gone offshore...most of the woodworker forums report Jet's quality control to be superior....'course all this is subject to manual recount http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

John058
11-27-2000, 10:15 PM
...as for Jet vs Delta...what was true yesterday may no longer be valid...seems that there's a whole bunch of Delta jointers out there with inferior castings now that they've gone offshore...most of the woodworker forums report Jet's quality control to be superior....'course all this is subject to manual recount http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

Ross Faneuf
11-29-2000, 05:52 PM
Scott - if you have to do a lot of resawing to get cold molding stock, you may want to reconsider band saw vs. table saw. I sawed all my stock out on the table saw, using a thin kerf blade. I could use the stock directly in molding. I would wonder if the result of band sawing is good enough - whether there are problems with controlling thickness and surface roughness. Since I haven't tried to band saw molding stock, I can't comment on how well it works. If what you are after is 1/8" veneer, you may want to consider buying it rather than making it. I've had reasonably good luck with meranti veneer, although I grant the quality is highly variable; I've had some which was not properly kiln dried and was weak and brittle.

For your futures list: I picked up a thicknessing sander not too long ago, and it is exceptional for producing really consistent thickness and surface quality for molding stock, and for final cleaning up of molded items. It definitely is a tool you'd get after a table saw and a band saw.

The comment about picking up the tool the job needs is certainly true. If you do it enough times, you get a really well equipped shop - and you actually needed all the stuff at some point or other.

Ross Faneuf
11-29-2000, 05:52 PM
Scott - if you have to do a lot of resawing to get cold molding stock, you may want to reconsider band saw vs. table saw. I sawed all my stock out on the table saw, using a thin kerf blade. I could use the stock directly in molding. I would wonder if the result of band sawing is good enough - whether there are problems with controlling thickness and surface roughness. Since I haven't tried to band saw molding stock, I can't comment on how well it works. If what you are after is 1/8" veneer, you may want to consider buying it rather than making it. I've had reasonably good luck with meranti veneer, although I grant the quality is highly variable; I've had some which was not properly kiln dried and was weak and brittle.

For your futures list: I picked up a thicknessing sander not too long ago, and it is exceptional for producing really consistent thickness and surface quality for molding stock, and for final cleaning up of molded items. It definitely is a tool you'd get after a table saw and a band saw.

The comment about picking up the tool the job needs is certainly true. If you do it enough times, you get a really well equipped shop - and you actually needed all the stuff at some point or other.

Ross Faneuf
11-29-2000, 05:52 PM
Scott - if you have to do a lot of resawing to get cold molding stock, you may want to reconsider band saw vs. table saw. I sawed all my stock out on the table saw, using a thin kerf blade. I could use the stock directly in molding. I would wonder if the result of band sawing is good enough - whether there are problems with controlling thickness and surface roughness. Since I haven't tried to band saw molding stock, I can't comment on how well it works. If what you are after is 1/8" veneer, you may want to consider buying it rather than making it. I've had reasonably good luck with meranti veneer, although I grant the quality is highly variable; I've had some which was not properly kiln dried and was weak and brittle.

For your futures list: I picked up a thicknessing sander not too long ago, and it is exceptional for producing really consistent thickness and surface quality for molding stock, and for final cleaning up of molded items. It definitely is a tool you'd get after a table saw and a band saw.

The comment about picking up the tool the job needs is certainly true. If you do it enough times, you get a really well equipped shop - and you actually needed all the stuff at some point or other.

Ernie Pawliuk
11-29-2000, 09:21 PM
Get her to spring for a few more bucks and look for a used Delta Unisaw. Most important tool in your arsenal. Will re-saw anything.
Small bandsaws are only good for cutting curves in small stock. Good for mould frames!
($.02) (Canadian $)

Ernie Pawliuk
11-29-2000, 09:21 PM
Get her to spring for a few more bucks and look for a used Delta Unisaw. Most important tool in your arsenal. Will re-saw anything.
Small bandsaws are only good for cutting curves in small stock. Good for mould frames!
($.02) (Canadian $)

Ernie Pawliuk
11-29-2000, 09:21 PM
Get her to spring for a few more bucks and look for a used Delta Unisaw. Most important tool in your arsenal. Will re-saw anything.
Small bandsaws are only good for cutting curves in small stock. Good for mould frames!
($.02) (Canadian $)

Andrew
12-06-2000, 09:41 AM
I agree with Ross about using the table saw for making veneers especially if the height of the blade provides sufficient width of veneer. If not then it becomes a worrisome task. I set a feather board at the verticle mid point of the board above the saw blade. The board is flipped end for end for the second cut. You shouldn't cut all the way through as the feather board would cause the blade to be pinched. Finish the cut on the band saw. Of coursehis requires joining or sanding the board flat.

I have succesfully used the bandsaw to resaw using a post parallel to the blade set at the desire thickness away from the blade. This allows the board to be move side to side to keep the blade on track, but it was hit or miss as the grain would often cause the blade to wander out at the bottom of the board. Even then the board had to be dressed as with above. If someone has a more successfull method of resawing I hope they share it.

While I do like using bandsaw and use them frequently when I'm at my local craft center a sabre saw serves me well enough at home. It's use of the table saw that brings me to the craft center more often than not.

Consequently, I would probably buy veneer if I had need of a quantity.

Andrew
12-06-2000, 09:41 AM
I agree with Ross about using the table saw for making veneers especially if the height of the blade provides sufficient width of veneer. If not then it becomes a worrisome task. I set a feather board at the verticle mid point of the board above the saw blade. The board is flipped end for end for the second cut. You shouldn't cut all the way through as the feather board would cause the blade to be pinched. Finish the cut on the band saw. Of coursehis requires joining or sanding the board flat.

I have succesfully used the bandsaw to resaw using a post parallel to the blade set at the desire thickness away from the blade. This allows the board to be move side to side to keep the blade on track, but it was hit or miss as the grain would often cause the blade to wander out at the bottom of the board. Even then the board had to be dressed as with above. If someone has a more successfull method of resawing I hope they share it.

While I do like using bandsaw and use them frequently when I'm at my local craft center a sabre saw serves me well enough at home. It's use of the table saw that brings me to the craft center more often than not.

Consequently, I would probably buy veneer if I had need of a quantity.

Andrew
12-06-2000, 09:41 AM
I agree with Ross about using the table saw for making veneers especially if the height of the blade provides sufficient width of veneer. If not then it becomes a worrisome task. I set a feather board at the verticle mid point of the board above the saw blade. The board is flipped end for end for the second cut. You shouldn't cut all the way through as the feather board would cause the blade to be pinched. Finish the cut on the band saw. Of coursehis requires joining or sanding the board flat.

I have succesfully used the bandsaw to resaw using a post parallel to the blade set at the desire thickness away from the blade. This allows the board to be move side to side to keep the blade on track, but it was hit or miss as the grain would often cause the blade to wander out at the bottom of the board. Even then the board had to be dressed as with above. If someone has a more successfull method of resawing I hope they share it.

While I do like using bandsaw and use them frequently when I'm at my local craft center a sabre saw serves me well enough at home. It's use of the table saw that brings me to the craft center more often than not.

Consequently, I would probably buy veneer if I had need of a quantity.

Jamie Hascall
12-06-2000, 10:45 PM
Unless you've got a buch of straight lines to do I'd definitely go with the band saw. I've resawn 6" wide stock with my 10" Inca with very little variation. I find a solidly clamped tall fence works the best, but it must be exactly aligned with the plane of the blade and the blade should be as wide as the saw can handle with very few teeth (3-4/Inch). I used a 1"x3tooth with the Inca. Just take it off when finished as it is a bit hard on the saw. Get everything aligned with the proper path of the blade to just maintain that path and you should get quite good results.

As far as safety goes, Just remember that Hobart makes more band saws than probably any other manufacturer. They're just for cutting up meat and that's all you are.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
12-06-2000, 10:45 PM
Unless you've got a buch of straight lines to do I'd definitely go with the band saw. I've resawn 6" wide stock with my 10" Inca with very little variation. I find a solidly clamped tall fence works the best, but it must be exactly aligned with the plane of the blade and the blade should be as wide as the saw can handle with very few teeth (3-4/Inch). I used a 1"x3tooth with the Inca. Just take it off when finished as it is a bit hard on the saw. Get everything aligned with the proper path of the blade to just maintain that path and you should get quite good results.

As far as safety goes, Just remember that Hobart makes more band saws than probably any other manufacturer. They're just for cutting up meat and that's all you are.

Jamie

Jamie Hascall
12-06-2000, 10:45 PM
Unless you've got a buch of straight lines to do I'd definitely go with the band saw. I've resawn 6" wide stock with my 10" Inca with very little variation. I find a solidly clamped tall fence works the best, but it must be exactly aligned with the plane of the blade and the blade should be as wide as the saw can handle with very few teeth (3-4/Inch). I used a 1"x3tooth with the Inca. Just take it off when finished as it is a bit hard on the saw. Get everything aligned with the proper path of the blade to just maintain that path and you should get quite good results.

As far as safety goes, Just remember that Hobart makes more band saws than probably any other manufacturer. They're just for cutting up meat and that's all you are.

Jamie

Ed Harrow
12-12-2000, 10:51 PM
Hey Scott, we're closing in on three weeks - what did you do? I haven't seen a check roll in from you, so at least I know one possible choice that you chose not to make.

Ed Harrow
12-12-2000, 10:51 PM
Hey Scott, we're closing in on three weeks - what did you do? I haven't seen a check roll in from you, so at least I know one possible choice that you chose not to make.

Ed Harrow
12-12-2000, 10:51 PM
Hey Scott, we're closing in on three weeks - what did you do? I haven't seen a check roll in from you, so at least I know one possible choice that you chose not to make.

Scott Rosen
12-13-2000, 09:38 AM
After waivering back and forth, over and over again, I've now decided to go with the table saw. I'm looking at the Delta 10" Contractors' models. I figure I can always cut curves with my jig saw, but there are so many things that are best done with a good table saw. With a good fence, I can even use it for jointing.

But I'm still counting ballots and examining chads.

Scott Rosen
12-13-2000, 09:38 AM
After waivering back and forth, over and over again, I've now decided to go with the table saw. I'm looking at the Delta 10" Contractors' models. I figure I can always cut curves with my jig saw, but there are so many things that are best done with a good table saw. With a good fence, I can even use it for jointing.

But I'm still counting ballots and examining chads.

Scott Rosen
12-13-2000, 09:38 AM
After waivering back and forth, over and over again, I've now decided to go with the table saw. I'm looking at the Delta 10" Contractors' models. I figure I can always cut curves with my jig saw, but there are so many things that are best done with a good table saw. With a good fence, I can even use it for jointing.

But I'm still counting ballots and examining chads.

ty
12-13-2000, 09:52 AM
if you are locking for a table saws go to grizzly atgrizzly.com

ty
12-13-2000, 09:52 AM
if you are locking for a table saws go to grizzly atgrizzly.com

ty
12-13-2000, 09:52 AM
if you are locking for a table saws go to grizzly atgrizzly.com

wandiwise
12-13-2000, 10:57 AM
Scott: After much advice on this forum and elsewhere, I went with the Delta Model 36-600 for five hundred bucks. I'm quite happy with it, other than not liking the location of the on-off switch. I understand, though, that the current model has moved that switch to a better location.

Good luck.

www

wandiwise
12-13-2000, 10:57 AM
Scott: After much advice on this forum and elsewhere, I went with the Delta Model 36-600 for five hundred bucks. I'm quite happy with it, other than not liking the location of the on-off switch. I understand, though, that the current model has moved that switch to a better location.

Good luck.

www

wandiwise
12-13-2000, 10:57 AM
Scott: After much advice on this forum and elsewhere, I went with the Delta Model 36-600 for five hundred bucks. I'm quite happy with it, other than not liking the location of the on-off switch. I understand, though, that the current model has moved that switch to a better location.

Good luck.

www

Gary Bergman
12-13-2000, 11:02 AM
Having had a finger or two stitched back on' it's really not all that bad as long as yo+u remember to pick 'em up' rinse 'em off' and get 'em on ice in the first 3 or 4 minutes to preserve the nerves.

Gary Bergman
12-13-2000, 11:02 AM
Having had a finger or two stitched back on' it's really not all that bad as long as yo+u remember to pick 'em up' rinse 'em off' and get 'em on ice in the first 3 or 4 minutes to preserve the nerves.

Gary Bergman
12-13-2000, 11:02 AM
Having had a finger or two stitched back on' it's really not all that bad as long as yo+u remember to pick 'em up' rinse 'em off' and get 'em on ice in the first 3 or 4 minutes to preserve the nerves.

Ed Harrow
12-13-2000, 12:29 PM
If you can manage to sneak some extra ballots into the box, you might consider one with a side table and Uni or Beysmeyer (sp?) fence. Mine has the 30 odd " table and Unifence. I find that it meets most of my needs (although that extra horizontal surface poses a severe challange to those with HSS).

In anycase, make yourself a SLAT (SLiding Auxiliary Table). Basically a piece of ply with a hefty hunk of wood (in my case 2x4 across the end nearest you) attached SQUARE to the blade. You'll wonder how you ever got along without it. For more instructions see Don Casey's "This Old Boat" or Practical Yacht Joinery" (Bruce Binghamton?) not certain. Someone will know, probably any decent tablesaw book will have plans. I have one (book) at home, but can't remember whether one (SLAT) is discussed.

Ed Harrow
12-13-2000, 12:29 PM
If you can manage to sneak some extra ballots into the box, you might consider one with a side table and Uni or Beysmeyer (sp?) fence. Mine has the 30 odd " table and Unifence. I find that it meets most of my needs (although that extra horizontal surface poses a severe challange to those with HSS).

In anycase, make yourself a SLAT (SLiding Auxiliary Table). Basically a piece of ply with a hefty hunk of wood (in my case 2x4 across the end nearest you) attached SQUARE to the blade. You'll wonder how you ever got along without it. For more instructions see Don Casey's "This Old Boat" or Practical Yacht Joinery" (Bruce Binghamton?) not certain. Someone will know, probably any decent tablesaw book will have plans. I have one (book) at home, but can't remember whether one (SLAT) is discussed.

Ed Harrow
12-13-2000, 12:29 PM
If you can manage to sneak some extra ballots into the box, you might consider one with a side table and Uni or Beysmeyer (sp?) fence. Mine has the 30 odd " table and Unifence. I find that it meets most of my needs (although that extra horizontal surface poses a severe challange to those with HSS).

In anycase, make yourself a SLAT (SLiding Auxiliary Table). Basically a piece of ply with a hefty hunk of wood (in my case 2x4 across the end nearest you) attached SQUARE to the blade. You'll wonder how you ever got along without it. For more instructions see Don Casey's "This Old Boat" or Practical Yacht Joinery" (Bruce Binghamton?) not certain. Someone will know, probably any decent tablesaw book will have plans. I have one (book) at home, but can't remember whether one (SLAT) is discussed.

Tom Lathrop
12-13-2000, 12:47 PM
Whatever tablesaw you might have, Ed's advice on making a cutoff box is the best you will get. Makes cutting large square panels easy and is the best for repetitive cuts, especially for small stuff where it greatly increases safety.

Tom Lathrop
12-13-2000, 12:47 PM
Whatever tablesaw you might have, Ed's advice on making a cutoff box is the best you will get. Makes cutting large square panels easy and is the best for repetitive cuts, especially for small stuff where it greatly increases safety.

Tom Lathrop
12-13-2000, 12:47 PM
Whatever tablesaw you might have, Ed's advice on making a cutoff box is the best you will get. Makes cutting large square panels easy and is the best for repetitive cuts, especially for small stuff where it greatly increases safety.

David Tabor (sailordave)
12-24-2000, 02:05 PM
Well my .02 says get a good 14" model; I have the Delta w/ the enclosed stand. As far as safety goes I've cut the same thumb on both the Delta Contractors (table) saw and the bandsaw. Fortunately I only lost some blood and pride. Both hurt like hell but the bandsaw cut was ragged and took forever to heal. I think the bandsaw is much more dangerous. 20 years of playing w/ wood/boats speaking now. Regards. David

David Tabor (sailordave)
12-24-2000, 02:05 PM
Well my .02 says get a good 14" model; I have the Delta w/ the enclosed stand. As far as safety goes I've cut the same thumb on both the Delta Contractors (table) saw and the bandsaw. Fortunately I only lost some blood and pride. Both hurt like hell but the bandsaw cut was ragged and took forever to heal. I think the bandsaw is much more dangerous. 20 years of playing w/ wood/boats speaking now. Regards. David

David Tabor (sailordave)
12-24-2000, 02:05 PM
Well my .02 says get a good 14" model; I have the Delta w/ the enclosed stand. As far as safety goes I've cut the same thumb on both the Delta Contractors (table) saw and the bandsaw. Fortunately I only lost some blood and pride. Both hurt like hell but the bandsaw cut was ragged and took forever to heal. I think the bandsaw is much more dangerous. 20 years of playing w/ wood/boats speaking now. Regards. David

Ed Harrow
01-05-2001, 01:16 PM
Scott, about a month and a half have passed. Any news? Any wood cut?

Ed Harrow
01-05-2001, 01:16 PM
Scott, about a month and a half have passed. Any news? Any wood cut?

Ed Harrow
01-05-2001, 01:16 PM
Scott, about a month and a half have passed. Any news? Any wood cut?

ROWE BOATS
01-14-2001, 10:07 AM
I don't know why the unisaw seems to be the ultimate saw. I much prefer powermatic. The switch is on the left, where it should be, the blade tilts away from the fence, and even though they are both 3 horsepower, the powermatic has more guts. I've owned my model 66 for 15 years of daily use, and wouldn't consider a unisaw. Yes, I have used a unisaw while working for Hinckley for 2 years. I've seen powermatics sell used for as little as 500 dollars. I have a 20 inch bandsaw that works grea, but the tablesaw is the real workhorse in my shop.

ROWE BOATS
01-14-2001, 10:07 AM
I don't know why the unisaw seems to be the ultimate saw. I much prefer powermatic. The switch is on the left, where it should be, the blade tilts away from the fence, and even though they are both 3 horsepower, the powermatic has more guts. I've owned my model 66 for 15 years of daily use, and wouldn't consider a unisaw. Yes, I have used a unisaw while working for Hinckley for 2 years. I've seen powermatics sell used for as little as 500 dollars. I have a 20 inch bandsaw that works grea, but the tablesaw is the real workhorse in my shop.

ROWE BOATS
01-14-2001, 10:07 AM
I don't know why the unisaw seems to be the ultimate saw. I much prefer powermatic. The switch is on the left, where it should be, the blade tilts away from the fence, and even though they are both 3 horsepower, the powermatic has more guts. I've owned my model 66 for 15 years of daily use, and wouldn't consider a unisaw. Yes, I have used a unisaw while working for Hinckley for 2 years. I've seen powermatics sell used for as little as 500 dollars. I have a 20 inch bandsaw that works grea, but the tablesaw is the real workhorse in my shop.

Scott Rosen
01-14-2001, 05:29 PM
I'm going with Delta 10" table saw, but I haven't picked a model yet. Work's been real busy lately, so I haven't had the time to make the space for it and actually order it. I haven't even had time to read the Forum for a week. I hope to be cutting wood before the spring.

Scott Rosen
01-14-2001, 05:29 PM
I'm going with Delta 10" table saw, but I haven't picked a model yet. Work's been real busy lately, so I haven't had the time to make the space for it and actually order it. I haven't even had time to read the Forum for a week. I hope to be cutting wood before the spring.

Scott Rosen
01-14-2001, 05:29 PM
I'm going with Delta 10" table saw, but I haven't picked a model yet. Work's been real busy lately, so I haven't had the time to make the space for it and actually order it. I haven't even had time to read the Forum for a week. I hope to be cutting wood before the spring.

ishmael
01-15-2001, 11:37 AM
Scott,

You won't regret a table saw, especially if you have any cabinetry projects in mind.

My impression a few years back, during a visit to Woodworkers Warehouse, was that for the contractors type open stand saws some of the foreign labels (I think most of the castings and such are all foreign these days) were a better value. A review of the last few years of Fine Woodworking or Fine Home Building would give a Consumer's Report type review of the options.

The tablesaw in an interesting "weapon". So much of its versatility depends on set up (outfeed rigs, room to pass large stock, fence, etc). If you're serious about any detailed work, plan on replacing the stock fence to a pretty $ tune.

The last time I worked much with one was in a large (spacewise) shop with an old well tuned unisaw set into a sturdy plywood table of perhaps twenty square feet. Lot's of room around the saw for sheet goods, long stock, and stopping to ponder. Ideal set up, except for some of the "really" fancy saws I've seen in really special shops.

That said, with a contractor's saw and some innovative thinking, you can accomplish a tremendous amount on a non/semi-commercial level. I sold my Delta contractor's saw to a fellow I was subcontracting to 'cause he had a shop and I didn't. and we went on to build many manners of houses and cabinets with it. Check out Fine Woodworking's book on small shops. Best of luck, Jack

P.S. Do be careful. I maintain the table saw is the potentially most disasterous tool in the shop. Haven't seen a commercial guard yet that wasn't removed, and if you get into intricate work you WILL bend the rules. Bend them only as your real understanding of the tool increases. The unexpected kick, in squirrely stock, when fingers happen to be in the wrong place--the danger. Don't get cocky! Lost fingers come down to inatention and pride. He he.

Amazing really, a circular blade set into a table. Where did that come from? A Shaker woman came up with the concept in 1813, or so I hear.

Now there is a story, but the details slip the steel sieve of my mind.


Best, Jack



[This message has been edited by ishmael (edited 01-15-2001).]

ishmael
01-15-2001, 11:37 AM
Scott,

You won't regret a table saw, especially if you have any cabinetry projects in mind.

My impression a few years back, during a visit to Woodworkers Warehouse, was that for the contractors type open stand saws some of the foreign labels (I think most of the castings and such are all foreign these days) were a better value. A review of the last few years of Fine Woodworking or Fine Home Building would give a Consumer's Report type review of the options.

The tablesaw in an interesting "weapon". So much of its versatility depends on set up (outfeed rigs, room to pass large stock, fence, etc). If you're serious about any detailed work, plan on replacing the stock fence to a pretty $ tune.

The last time I worked much with one was in a large (spacewise) shop with an old well tuned unisaw set into a sturdy plywood table of perhaps twenty square feet. Lot's of room around the saw for sheet goods, long stock, and stopping to ponder. Ideal set up, except for some of the "really" fancy saws I've seen in really special shops.

That said, with a contractor's saw and some innovative thinking, you can accomplish a tremendous amount on a non/semi-commercial level. I sold my Delta contractor's saw to a fellow I was subcontracting to 'cause he had a shop and I didn't. and we went on to build many manners of houses and cabinets with it. Check out Fine Woodworking's book on small shops. Best of luck, Jack

P.S. Do be careful. I maintain the table saw is the potentially most disasterous tool in the shop. Haven't seen a commercial guard yet that wasn't removed, and if you get into intricate work you WILL bend the rules. Bend them only as your real understanding of the tool increases. The unexpected kick, in squirrely stock, when fingers happen to be in the wrong place--the danger. Don't get cocky! Lost fingers come down to inatention and pride. He he.

Amazing really, a circular blade set into a table. Where did that come from? A Shaker woman came up with the concept in 1813, or so I hear.

Now there is a story, but the details slip the steel sieve of my mind.


Best, Jack



[This message has been edited by ishmael (edited 01-15-2001).]

ishmael
01-15-2001, 11:37 AM
Scott,

You won't regret a table saw, especially if you have any cabinetry projects in mind.

My impression a few years back, during a visit to Woodworkers Warehouse, was that for the contractors type open stand saws some of the foreign labels (I think most of the castings and such are all foreign these days) were a better value. A review of the last few years of Fine Woodworking or Fine Home Building would give a Consumer's Report type review of the options.

The tablesaw in an interesting "weapon". So much of its versatility depends on set up (outfeed rigs, room to pass large stock, fence, etc). If you're serious about any detailed work, plan on replacing the stock fence to a pretty $ tune.

The last time I worked much with one was in a large (spacewise) shop with an old well tuned unisaw set into a sturdy plywood table of perhaps twenty square feet. Lot's of room around the saw for sheet goods, long stock, and stopping to ponder. Ideal set up, except for some of the "really" fancy saws I've seen in really special shops.

That said, with a contractor's saw and some innovative thinking, you can accomplish a tremendous amount on a non/semi-commercial level. I sold my Delta contractor's saw to a fellow I was subcontracting to 'cause he had a shop and I didn't. and we went on to build many manners of houses and cabinets with it. Check out Fine Woodworking's book on small shops. Best of luck, Jack

P.S. Do be careful. I maintain the table saw is the potentially most disasterous tool in the shop. Haven't seen a commercial guard yet that wasn't removed, and if you get into intricate work you WILL bend the rules. Bend them only as your real understanding of the tool increases. The unexpected kick, in squirrely stock, when fingers happen to be in the wrong place--the danger. Don't get cocky! Lost fingers come down to inatention and pride. He he.

Amazing really, a circular blade set into a table. Where did that come from? A Shaker woman came up with the concept in 1813, or so I hear.

Now there is a story, but the details slip the steel sieve of my mind.


Best, Jack



[This message has been edited by ishmael (edited 01-15-2001).]

Ed Harrow
01-15-2001, 12:35 PM
I hear the bankruptcy business is picking up... Maybe a bandsaw in your future, too?

Ed Harrow
01-15-2001, 12:35 PM
I hear the bankruptcy business is picking up... Maybe a bandsaw in your future, too?

Ed Harrow
01-15-2001, 12:35 PM
I hear the bankruptcy business is picking up... Maybe a bandsaw in your future, too?

NormMessinger
01-19-2001, 02:43 PM
And, Scott. If you do cut off a finger take it with you to the emergency room. Chances are good they can tack it back on. If you don't have the proper saline solution in which to transport it, fresh urine, preferable male, works just fine.

Enjoy your saw. Good choice.

--Norm

NormMessinger
01-19-2001, 02:43 PM
And, Scott. If you do cut off a finger take it with you to the emergency room. Chances are good they can tack it back on. If you don't have the proper saline solution in which to transport it, fresh urine, preferable male, works just fine.

Enjoy your saw. Good choice.

--Norm

NormMessinger
01-19-2001, 02:43 PM
And, Scott. If you do cut off a finger take it with you to the emergency room. Chances are good they can tack it back on. If you don't have the proper saline solution in which to transport it, fresh urine, preferable male, works just fine.

Enjoy your saw. Good choice.

--Norm

TomRobb
01-22-2001, 08:47 AM
Preferably male? Why? Urine might work, btw. A nurse once told me that unless you're sick w/ a kidney infection, urine is sterile.

TomRobb
01-22-2001, 08:47 AM
Preferably male? Why? Urine might work, btw. A nurse once told me that unless you're sick w/ a kidney infection, urine is sterile.

TomRobb
01-22-2001, 08:47 AM
Preferably male? Why? Urine might work, btw. A nurse once told me that unless you're sick w/ a kidney infection, urine is sterile.

NormMessinger
01-22-2001, 12:14 PM
Female urine is less likely to be sterile, for reasons of extraurethra anatomy, but if one has a finger flopping around loose in a pile of sawdust the important thing is to not let it dry out.

I bought a Craftsman-they-don't-make-them-like-that-any-more radial arm saw about 40 years ago. Took it home and set it up. First night I had a dream that I had cut my hand of at the wrist. Took the hand to the dr. who asked what I wanted him to do with that. "Well I was hoping you could sew it back on." "Oh, I guess I could but it would sure be a lot of trouble."

I still have all my birth parts (Yes Scott, all) but that dream is still in my mind when ever I fire up a saw or someone brings up the topic.

Be ye carefull but not afraid.

--Norm

NormMessinger
01-22-2001, 12:14 PM
Female urine is less likely to be sterile, for reasons of extraurethra anatomy, but if one has a finger flopping around loose in a pile of sawdust the important thing is to not let it dry out.

I bought a Craftsman-they-don't-make-them-like-that-any-more radial arm saw about 40 years ago. Took it home and set it up. First night I had a dream that I had cut my hand of at the wrist. Took the hand to the dr. who asked what I wanted him to do with that. "Well I was hoping you could sew it back on." "Oh, I guess I could but it would sure be a lot of trouble."

I still have all my birth parts (Yes Scott, all) but that dream is still in my mind when ever I fire up a saw or someone brings up the topic.

Be ye carefull but not afraid.

--Norm

NormMessinger
01-22-2001, 12:14 PM
Female urine is less likely to be sterile, for reasons of extraurethra anatomy, but if one has a finger flopping around loose in a pile of sawdust the important thing is to not let it dry out.

I bought a Craftsman-they-don't-make-them-like-that-any-more radial arm saw about 40 years ago. Took it home and set it up. First night I had a dream that I had cut my hand of at the wrist. Took the hand to the dr. who asked what I wanted him to do with that. "Well I was hoping you could sew it back on." "Oh, I guess I could but it would sure be a lot of trouble."

I still have all my birth parts (Yes Scott, all) but that dream is still in my mind when ever I fire up a saw or someone brings up the topic.

Be ye carefull but not afraid.

--Norm

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 02:39 PM
Herb Smith, and others with schooner and larger-vessel building experience, like chain saws.

I use three Stihls, an 065, an 041, and an 015, and they are all very useful.

I don't think they are any more dangerous than a skil saw, and you can work to + or - an 1/8 inch if you're careful.

But they don't seem to get much respect. No air of antiquity or craftsmanlike allure, I guess.

But they can be effective at getting the job done. Comments, anyone?

Alan

[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-23-2001).]

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 02:39 PM
Herb Smith, and others with schooner and larger-vessel building experience, like chain saws.

I use three Stihls, an 065, an 041, and an 015, and they are all very useful.

I don't think they are any more dangerous than a skil saw, and you can work to + or - an 1/8 inch if you're careful.

But they don't seem to get much respect. No air of antiquity or craftsmanlike allure, I guess.

But they can be effective at getting the job done. Comments, anyone?

Alan

[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-23-2001).]

Alan D. Hyde
01-23-2001, 02:39 PM
Herb Smith, and others with schooner and larger-vessel building experience, like chain saws.

I use three Stihls, an 065, an 041, and an 015, and they are all very useful.

I don't think they are any more dangerous than a skil saw, and you can work to + or - an 1/8 inch if you're careful.

But they don't seem to get much respect. No air of antiquity or craftsmanlike allure, I guess.

But they can be effective at getting the job done. Comments, anyone?

Alan

[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-23-2001).]

Syd MacDonald
01-23-2001, 11:08 PM
Your right Allan. Try splitting a 4x4 sheet of plywood in two to get it down to managable size using a skill saw or a table saw with out extension tables while working by yourself. Drop it down onto two 2x4's, strike a chalk line and rip it with a chainsaw.

Syd MacDonald
01-23-2001, 11:08 PM
Your right Allan. Try splitting a 4x4 sheet of plywood in two to get it down to managable size using a skill saw or a table saw with out extension tables while working by yourself. Drop it down onto two 2x4's, strike a chalk line and rip it with a chainsaw.

Syd MacDonald
01-23-2001, 11:08 PM
Your right Allan. Try splitting a 4x4 sheet of plywood in two to get it down to managable size using a skill saw or a table saw with out extension tables while working by yourself. Drop it down onto two 2x4's, strike a chalk line and rip it with a chainsaw.

Ed Harrow
01-23-2001, 11:31 PM
I have a personal and intense dislike of chainsaws. (At least I still have all my parts.)

Ed Harrow
01-23-2001, 11:31 PM
I have a personal and intense dislike of chainsaws. (At least I still have all my parts.)

Ed Harrow
01-23-2001, 11:31 PM
I have a personal and intense dislike of chainsaws. (At least I still have all my parts.)

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 01:17 PM
Ed-------

It is ironic that chainsaws, which are OBVIOUSLY dangerous, are for that reason often less dangerous than skil saws and table and band saws, with their various guards, which sometimes lull their users into a false sense of security (and the guards are impossible to work with and must be removed).

I say God bless Mr. Stihl.

BUT... be careful.

Alan


[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-25-2001).]

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 01:17 PM
Ed-------

It is ironic that chainsaws, which are OBVIOUSLY dangerous, are for that reason often less dangerous than skil saws and table and band saws, with their various guards, which sometimes lull their users into a false sense of security (and the guards are impossible to work with and must be removed).

I say God bless Mr. Stihl.

BUT... be careful.

Alan


[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-25-2001).]

Alan D. Hyde
01-24-2001, 01:17 PM
Ed-------

It is ironic that chainsaws, which are OBVIOUSLY dangerous, are for that reason often less dangerous than skil saws and table and band saws, with their various guards, which sometimes lull their users into a false sense of security (and the guards are impossible to work with and must be removed).

I say God bless Mr. Stihl.

BUT... be careful.

Alan


[This message has been edited by Alan D. Hyde (edited 01-25-2001).]

Matt J.
01-25-2001, 01:15 PM
I like chainsaws... can't help it.
trying to cut my keel timber, after which is the stern knee and post. The timbers for these parts are too large to even consider getting onto a table saw, bandsaw, etc... they each weigh several hundred pounds, and although I'm brazen, I've learned that my back will kick my butt inthe morning.

The fella I bought the timbers from had a Husqvarna (350?) and I've now decided tha although by the time I can afford it I won't need it, I will have one of those eventually. That thing sliced my timbers (15" x 10" +/- in cross section) like my table saw cutting poplar. I've been making due with Dad's Homelite http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/rolleyes.gif

Matt J.
01-25-2001, 01:15 PM
I like chainsaws... can't help it.
trying to cut my keel timber, after which is the stern knee and post. The timbers for these parts are too large to even consider getting onto a table saw, bandsaw, etc... they each weigh several hundred pounds, and although I'm brazen, I've learned that my back will kick my butt inthe morning.

The fella I bought the timbers from had a Husqvarna (350?) and I've now decided tha although by the time I can afford it I won't need it, I will have one of those eventually. That thing sliced my timbers (15" x 10" +/- in cross section) like my table saw cutting poplar. I've been making due with Dad's Homelite http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/rolleyes.gif

Matt J.
01-25-2001, 01:15 PM
I like chainsaws... can't help it.
trying to cut my keel timber, after which is the stern knee and post. The timbers for these parts are too large to even consider getting onto a table saw, bandsaw, etc... they each weigh several hundred pounds, and although I'm brazen, I've learned that my back will kick my butt inthe morning.

The fella I bought the timbers from had a Husqvarna (350?) and I've now decided tha although by the time I can afford it I won't need it, I will have one of those eventually. That thing sliced my timbers (15" x 10" +/- in cross section) like my table saw cutting poplar. I've been making due with Dad's Homelite http://media5.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/rolleyes.gif

Ron Williamson
01-27-2001, 02:21 PM
The log housebuilders thatI used to work with,in Alberta and B.C.could split a scribe line with a chainsaw at walking speed.
What most people don't realize about chainsaws, is that they are variable speed,and you can match it to the job.

Ron Williamson
01-27-2001, 02:21 PM
The log housebuilders thatI used to work with,in Alberta and B.C.could split a scribe line with a chainsaw at walking speed.
What most people don't realize about chainsaws, is that they are variable speed,and you can match it to the job.

Ron Williamson
01-27-2001, 02:21 PM
The log housebuilders thatI used to work with,in Alberta and B.C.could split a scribe line with a chainsaw at walking speed.
What most people don't realize about chainsaws, is that they are variable speed,and you can match it to the job.

Ed Harrow
01-28-2001, 08:16 PM
I used a chainsaw for two - three years while earning tuition money as a tree climber. It's a good thing or, when I got into an arguement with one, I'd probably have been much the worse for the encounter.

That use was not sufficient to come closs to making me feel like a pro; I've seen pros use chainsaws, and what they do with them has to be, as some of you have stated, seen to be believed.

Yes, indeed, paranoia is a good thing...

Ed

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-29-2001).]

Ed Harrow
01-28-2001, 08:16 PM
I used a chainsaw for two - three years while earning tuition money as a tree climber. It's a good thing or, when I got into an arguement with one, I'd probably have been much the worse for the encounter.

That use was not sufficient to come closs to making me feel like a pro; I've seen pros use chainsaws, and what they do with them has to be, as some of you have stated, seen to be believed.

Yes, indeed, paranoia is a good thing...

Ed

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-29-2001).]

Ed Harrow
01-28-2001, 08:16 PM
I used a chainsaw for two - three years while earning tuition money as a tree climber. It's a good thing or, when I got into an arguement with one, I'd probably have been much the worse for the encounter.

That use was not sufficient to come closs to making me feel like a pro; I've seen pros use chainsaws, and what they do with them has to be, as some of you have stated, seen to be believed.

Yes, indeed, paranoia is a good thing...

Ed

[This message has been edited by Ed Harrow (edited 01-29-2001).]

paladin
01-29-2001, 06:25 AM
In reference to bad dreams with table saws...and another business before wooden boat building, the phrase brought most to mind is "Perfect paranoia is perfect awareness".

paladin
01-29-2001, 06:25 AM
In reference to bad dreams with table saws...and another business before wooden boat building, the phrase brought most to mind is "Perfect paranoia is perfect awareness".

paladin
01-29-2001, 06:25 AM
In reference to bad dreams with table saws...and another business before wooden boat building, the phrase brought most to mind is "Perfect paranoia is perfect awareness".

Scott Rosen
06-07-2001, 10:08 AM
No one will ever accuse me of being fast at these things. I finally got the saw: a Delta 10" Contractor's Saw with a Beisemeyer fence. Took delivery of three boxes this morning. My wife is already asking me when her Adarondack furniture will be done.

Scott Rosen
06-07-2001, 10:08 AM
No one will ever accuse me of being fast at these things. I finally got the saw: a Delta 10" Contractor's Saw with a Beisemeyer fence. Took delivery of three boxes this morning. My wife is already asking me when her Adarondack furniture will be done.

Scott Rosen
06-07-2001, 10:08 AM
No one will ever accuse me of being fast at these things. I finally got the saw: a Delta 10" Contractor's Saw with a Beisemeyer fence. Took delivery of three boxes this morning. My wife is already asking me when her Adarondack furniture will be done.

Alan Peck
06-07-2001, 10:29 AM
If you don't have your plans yet for your Adirondack furniture you might check "The Winfield Collection" catalog.

They have plans for some Adirondack chairs. I built two chairs with the plans and am very pleased with them. I think the plans are better than most because the chairs have curved backs and seats and don't use an ugly brace between the legs and the back.

I think you can get a catalog by calling 1 800 946-3435

Alan Peck
06-07-2001, 10:29 AM
If you don't have your plans yet for your Adirondack furniture you might check "The Winfield Collection" catalog.

They have plans for some Adirondack chairs. I built two chairs with the plans and am very pleased with them. I think the plans are better than most because the chairs have curved backs and seats and don't use an ugly brace between the legs and the back.

I think you can get a catalog by calling 1 800 946-3435

Alan Peck
06-07-2001, 10:29 AM
If you don't have your plans yet for your Adirondack furniture you might check "The Winfield Collection" catalog.

They have plans for some Adirondack chairs. I built two chairs with the plans and am very pleased with them. I think the plans are better than most because the chairs have curved backs and seats and don't use an ugly brace between the legs and the back.

I think you can get a catalog by calling 1 800 946-3435

RGM
06-07-2001, 01:52 PM
Scott, congradulations on the new addition to your family. Perhaps you can convince your wonderful, loving and caring wife that instead of Adirondack furniture what she really needs is a nice new moisture meter, if their isn't one in the family yet.
Isn't love grand.

RGM
06-07-2001, 01:52 PM
Scott, congradulations on the new addition to your family. Perhaps you can convince your wonderful, loving and caring wife that instead of Adirondack furniture what she really needs is a nice new moisture meter, if their isn't one in the family yet.
Isn't love grand.

RGM
06-07-2001, 01:52 PM
Scott, congradulations on the new addition to your family. Perhaps you can convince your wonderful, loving and caring wife that instead of Adirondack furniture what she really needs is a nice new moisture meter, if their isn't one in the family yet.
Isn't love grand.

Ed Harrow
06-07-2001, 01:53 PM
Besides (if you don't have a bandsaw) making those chairs sounds like the perfect excuse to get one (a bandsaw).

Nice saw Scott, I'm really glad I sprung for the money for mine. Also, somebody out there makes some pretty clever gizmos to align the saw, making it nearly as easy as a cabinet saw. If you're interested, and I find them again, I'll let you know.

Don't forget to make the SLAT for your saw!

Ed Harrow
06-07-2001, 01:53 PM
Besides (if you don't have a bandsaw) making those chairs sounds like the perfect excuse to get one (a bandsaw).

Nice saw Scott, I'm really glad I sprung for the money for mine. Also, somebody out there makes some pretty clever gizmos to align the saw, making it nearly as easy as a cabinet saw. If you're interested, and I find them again, I'll let you know.

Don't forget to make the SLAT for your saw!

Ed Harrow
06-07-2001, 01:53 PM
Besides (if you don't have a bandsaw) making those chairs sounds like the perfect excuse to get one (a bandsaw).

Nice saw Scott, I'm really glad I sprung for the money for mine. Also, somebody out there makes some pretty clever gizmos to align the saw, making it nearly as easy as a cabinet saw. If you're interested, and I find them again, I'll let you know.

Don't forget to make the SLAT for your saw!

Jeff Kelety
06-09-2001, 09:22 PM
<You can't go wrong with a 14 inch bandsaw. I would not be happy with a smaller unit.>

Echo this! Picked up a small, Delta tabletop band saw a while back before I got into this endeavor. Great for balsawood and Christmas ornaments, useless for boat building.

jgk

Jeff Kelety
06-09-2001, 09:22 PM
<You can't go wrong with a 14 inch bandsaw. I would not be happy with a smaller unit.>

Echo this! Picked up a small, Delta tabletop band saw a while back before I got into this endeavor. Great for balsawood and Christmas ornaments, useless for boat building.

jgk

Jeff Kelety
06-09-2001, 09:22 PM
<You can't go wrong with a 14 inch bandsaw. I would not be happy with a smaller unit.>

Echo this! Picked up a small, Delta tabletop band saw a while back before I got into this endeavor. Great for balsawood and Christmas ornaments, useless for boat building.

jgk

Bob Cleek
06-10-2001, 03:21 AM
An aside on chain saws... I saw this series on ESPN on this logging skills championship run by the Stihl chain saw outfit. One of the events involved cutting three two inch slices off maybe a 2 foot diameter log in the shortest amount of time. The catch was that the slices had to come off the last six inches of the butt or the sawyer was disqualified. They were doing this with these homemade chainsaws that were to chain saws like "BigFoot" is to pick up trucks. Powered with Kawasaki motorcycle engines! Really scary! What they did with a broad axe was pretty impressive, too. The winners seemed to come from New Zealand, mostly. Serious logging there, I guess.

Bob Cleek
06-10-2001, 03:21 AM
An aside on chain saws... I saw this series on ESPN on this logging skills championship run by the Stihl chain saw outfit. One of the events involved cutting three two inch slices off maybe a 2 foot diameter log in the shortest amount of time. The catch was that the slices had to come off the last six inches of the butt or the sawyer was disqualified. They were doing this with these homemade chainsaws that were to chain saws like "BigFoot" is to pick up trucks. Powered with Kawasaki motorcycle engines! Really scary! What they did with a broad axe was pretty impressive, too. The winners seemed to come from New Zealand, mostly. Serious logging there, I guess.

Bob Cleek
06-10-2001, 03:21 AM
An aside on chain saws... I saw this series on ESPN on this logging skills championship run by the Stihl chain saw outfit. One of the events involved cutting three two inch slices off maybe a 2 foot diameter log in the shortest amount of time. The catch was that the slices had to come off the last six inches of the butt or the sawyer was disqualified. They were doing this with these homemade chainsaws that were to chain saws like "BigFoot" is to pick up trucks. Powered with Kawasaki motorcycle engines! Really scary! What they did with a broad axe was pretty impressive, too. The winners seemed to come from New Zealand, mostly. Serious logging there, I guess.

Ross Faneuf
06-26-2001, 02:13 PM
Two more chain saw asides (is it National Irrelevance Day?)

1. Those slices are called 'cookies' by competitive lumbermen. Those here who remember Gordon Bok's little fable 'Jeremy Brown and the Jeanie Teal' will remember that 'stump cookies' are mentioned at some point. Makes ya wonder.

2. My favorite personal story to illustrate the difference between urbanites (them) and (at least vaguely) ruralites (us, or at least me). I was leaving the office early one day (yes, ruralites have offices too) because I needed to buy a new chain saw (Stihl, of course, not that it's relevant). A colleage was leaving at the same time, and asked me where I was off to (just to make conversation). Replied I was off to buy a new chain saw. Gives my a look of disbelief, asks 'why are going to buy a chain saw?' (presumably only familiar with use of chain saw as seen in the movies - say, 'Texas Chain Saw Massacre'). Replied again that I was buying a new chain saw because I had worn out my old one. Look of stunned disbelief - 'You wore out a chain saw?!?!?'.

Real reason for making this post - hoping to get WBForum record for most parenthetical phrases (like this one).

Ross Faneuf
06-26-2001, 02:13 PM
Two more chain saw asides (is it National Irrelevance Day?)

1. Those slices are called 'cookies' by competitive lumbermen. Those here who remember Gordon Bok's little fable 'Jeremy Brown and the Jeanie Teal' will remember that 'stump cookies' are mentioned at some point. Makes ya wonder.

2. My favorite personal story to illustrate the difference between urbanites (them) and (at least vaguely) ruralites (us, or at least me). I was leaving the office early one day (yes, ruralites have offices too) because I needed to buy a new chain saw (Stihl, of course, not that it's relevant). A colleage was leaving at the same time, and asked me where I was off to (just to make conversation). Replied I was off to buy a new chain saw. Gives my a look of disbelief, asks 'why are going to buy a chain saw?' (presumably only familiar with use of chain saw as seen in the movies - say, 'Texas Chain Saw Massacre'). Replied again that I was buying a new chain saw because I had worn out my old one. Look of stunned disbelief - 'You wore out a chain saw?!?!?'.

Real reason for making this post - hoping to get WBForum record for most parenthetical phrases (like this one).

Ross Faneuf
06-26-2001, 02:13 PM
Two more chain saw asides (is it National Irrelevance Day?)

1. Those slices are called 'cookies' by competitive lumbermen. Those here who remember Gordon Bok's little fable 'Jeremy Brown and the Jeanie Teal' will remember that 'stump cookies' are mentioned at some point. Makes ya wonder.

2. My favorite personal story to illustrate the difference between urbanites (them) and (at least vaguely) ruralites (us, or at least me). I was leaving the office early one day (yes, ruralites have offices too) because I needed to buy a new chain saw (Stihl, of course, not that it's relevant). A colleage was leaving at the same time, and asked me where I was off to (just to make conversation). Replied I was off to buy a new chain saw. Gives my a look of disbelief, asks 'why are going to buy a chain saw?' (presumably only familiar with use of chain saw as seen in the movies - say, 'Texas Chain Saw Massacre'). Replied again that I was buying a new chain saw because I had worn out my old one. Look of stunned disbelief - 'You wore out a chain saw?!?!?'.

Real reason for making this post - hoping to get WBForum record for most parenthetical phrases (like this one).

Alan D. Hyde
06-26-2001, 02:52 PM
Ross, I've got one of the first Stihl 041AVE saws imported into the U.S.

It's getting old, but runs well on a good day.

It remains my favorite chain saw.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
06-26-2001, 02:52 PM
Ross, I've got one of the first Stihl 041AVE saws imported into the U.S.

It's getting old, but runs well on a good day.

It remains my favorite chain saw.

Alan

Alan D. Hyde
06-26-2001, 02:52 PM
Ross, I've got one of the first Stihl 041AVE saws imported into the U.S.

It's getting old, but runs well on a good day.

It remains my favorite chain saw.

Alan

imported_Phil
07-05-2001, 08:58 PM
A friend of mine who is in the Army said "the table saw is the most powerful tool in your arsenal" Sounds good to me!
Phil

imported_Phil
07-05-2001, 08:58 PM
A friend of mine who is in the Army said "the table saw is the most powerful tool in your arsenal" Sounds good to me!
Phil

imported_Phil
07-05-2001, 08:58 PM
A friend of mine who is in the Army said "the table saw is the most powerful tool in your arsenal" Sounds good to me!
Phil