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Kermit
11-02-2000, 10:08 PM
There's another choice. Just today I recieved a new catalog from Garret Wade, and someone there is paying attention. There hasn't been much choice for those wanting to purchase a new handplane. It's pretty much been either the Stanley/Record planes with the elegant plastic handles or the Lie-Nielsen models with the cherry handles. They are a couple of hundred bucks and more apart. Now comes someone here in the US stocking the Clifton line of Bailey-pattern planes, priced about in the middle. The #3, 4, and 5 are $199 apieceach. They appear to be worth a look.

They claim them to be "far superior" to the Stanley/Record tools. The level of finish appears to be much better than the S/R, and the price is about midway between the S/R and L-N. They say the frog is the "fully machined Bedrock-style." They are heavy! The #5 is 6 lbs--about 20% heavier than the #5 S/R. They have the #'s 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Sorry, no corrugated soles.

I have an old Stanley #4 with a Clifton iron/cap iron, and can say that they are wondrous. I like it better than the Hock I have in a #5. If someone buys one, I'd sure like to hear your impressions. Oh--the Clifton's handles are Bubinga, and I don't own stock in any of these outfits.

Kermit
11-02-2000, 10:08 PM
There's another choice. Just today I recieved a new catalog from Garret Wade, and someone there is paying attention. There hasn't been much choice for those wanting to purchase a new handplane. It's pretty much been either the Stanley/Record planes with the elegant plastic handles or the Lie-Nielsen models with the cherry handles. They are a couple of hundred bucks and more apart. Now comes someone here in the US stocking the Clifton line of Bailey-pattern planes, priced about in the middle. The #3, 4, and 5 are $199 apieceach. They appear to be worth a look.

They claim them to be "far superior" to the Stanley/Record tools. The level of finish appears to be much better than the S/R, and the price is about midway between the S/R and L-N. They say the frog is the "fully machined Bedrock-style." They are heavy! The #5 is 6 lbs--about 20% heavier than the #5 S/R. They have the #'s 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Sorry, no corrugated soles.

I have an old Stanley #4 with a Clifton iron/cap iron, and can say that they are wondrous. I like it better than the Hock I have in a #5. If someone buys one, I'd sure like to hear your impressions. Oh--the Clifton's handles are Bubinga, and I don't own stock in any of these outfits.

Kermit
11-02-2000, 10:08 PM
There's another choice. Just today I recieved a new catalog from Garret Wade, and someone there is paying attention. There hasn't been much choice for those wanting to purchase a new handplane. It's pretty much been either the Stanley/Record planes with the elegant plastic handles or the Lie-Nielsen models with the cherry handles. They are a couple of hundred bucks and more apart. Now comes someone here in the US stocking the Clifton line of Bailey-pattern planes, priced about in the middle. The #3, 4, and 5 are $199 apieceach. They appear to be worth a look.

They claim them to be "far superior" to the Stanley/Record tools. The level of finish appears to be much better than the S/R, and the price is about midway between the S/R and L-N. They say the frog is the "fully machined Bedrock-style." They are heavy! The #5 is 6 lbs--about 20% heavier than the #5 S/R. They have the #'s 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Sorry, no corrugated soles.

I have an old Stanley #4 with a Clifton iron/cap iron, and can say that they are wondrous. I like it better than the Hock I have in a #5. If someone buys one, I'd sure like to hear your impressions. Oh--the Clifton's handles are Bubinga, and I don't own stock in any of these outfits.

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 10:00 AM
Long before I became interested in boats, I took up woodworking as a hobby, and it didn't take long to figure out that with handtools, the older ones were not only better, but cheaper (this was before Tom L-N, etc).

Throughout the US, and most of the rest of the world, there are organizations - clubs, really - dedicated to the collection and preservation of old tools. A lot of these folks collect high end stuff, but (IMO) the majority are always on the lookout for user-grade stuff, and there's a growing market for user-grade tools out there.

Wherever you live, there is almost surely one of these organizations. Here in the DC area, the Potomac Antique Tools and Industries Association (PATINA) has bi-monthly get-togethers, where one of the primary activities is tailgate sales. It's fairly easy to pick up a vintage Stanley for $20-$40. Put an order in for a Hock iron (www.hocktools.com), and you're in business.

Check out www.mwtca.org (http://www.mwtca.org) for an idea of what's available. The Midwest Tool Collectors Association is national, but check out the "Meeting Schedule/Area Map" link to find out what's near you.

A list of local orgs can be found at http://www.oldtools.com/clubs.html

There! That's a good push down the slippery slope. Heh heh heh.

-T

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 10:00 AM
Long before I became interested in boats, I took up woodworking as a hobby, and it didn't take long to figure out that with handtools, the older ones were not only better, but cheaper (this was before Tom L-N, etc).

Throughout the US, and most of the rest of the world, there are organizations - clubs, really - dedicated to the collection and preservation of old tools. A lot of these folks collect high end stuff, but (IMO) the majority are always on the lookout for user-grade stuff, and there's a growing market for user-grade tools out there.

Wherever you live, there is almost surely one of these organizations. Here in the DC area, the Potomac Antique Tools and Industries Association (PATINA) has bi-monthly get-togethers, where one of the primary activities is tailgate sales. It's fairly easy to pick up a vintage Stanley for $20-$40. Put an order in for a Hock iron (www.hocktools.com), and you're in business.

Check out www.mwtca.org (http://www.mwtca.org) for an idea of what's available. The Midwest Tool Collectors Association is national, but check out the "Meeting Schedule/Area Map" link to find out what's near you.

A list of local orgs can be found at http://www.oldtools.com/clubs.html

There! That's a good push down the slippery slope. Heh heh heh.

-T

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 10:00 AM
Long before I became interested in boats, I took up woodworking as a hobby, and it didn't take long to figure out that with handtools, the older ones were not only better, but cheaper (this was before Tom L-N, etc).

Throughout the US, and most of the rest of the world, there are organizations - clubs, really - dedicated to the collection and preservation of old tools. A lot of these folks collect high end stuff, but (IMO) the majority are always on the lookout for user-grade stuff, and there's a growing market for user-grade tools out there.

Wherever you live, there is almost surely one of these organizations. Here in the DC area, the Potomac Antique Tools and Industries Association (PATINA) has bi-monthly get-togethers, where one of the primary activities is tailgate sales. It's fairly easy to pick up a vintage Stanley for $20-$40. Put an order in for a Hock iron (www.hocktools.com), and you're in business.

Check out www.mwtca.org (http://www.mwtca.org) for an idea of what's available. The Midwest Tool Collectors Association is national, but check out the "Meeting Schedule/Area Map" link to find out what's near you.

A list of local orgs can be found at http://www.oldtools.com/clubs.html

There! That's a good push down the slippery slope. Heh heh heh.

-T

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 11:10 AM
I probably should add that all of these orgs allow and encourage non-members at the meetings/tailgate orgies.

Just in case you were afraid you had to join something http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

-T

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 11:10 AM
I probably should add that all of these orgs allow and encourage non-members at the meetings/tailgate orgies.

Just in case you were afraid you had to join something http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

-T

Tom Dugan
11-03-2000, 11:10 AM
I probably should add that all of these orgs allow and encourage non-members at the meetings/tailgate orgies.

Just in case you were afraid you had to join something http://media4.hypernet.com/~dick/ubb/smile.gif

-T

Don Maurer
11-03-2000, 11:14 AM
Just go to Ebay and search on antique tools. At least half the listings are for old Stanley planes and copies. A lot of the more common ones in working condition sell for bargain prices.

Don Maurer
11-03-2000, 11:14 AM
Just go to Ebay and search on antique tools. At least half the listings are for old Stanley planes and copies. A lot of the more common ones in working condition sell for bargain prices.

Don Maurer
11-03-2000, 11:14 AM
Just go to Ebay and search on antique tools. At least half the listings are for old Stanley planes and copies. A lot of the more common ones in working condition sell for bargain prices.

Kermit
11-03-2000, 06:20 PM
I couldn't agree more that the old tools are often the best and for the best prices. I just thought that if there's someone out there anal enough to cut absolutely no corners on "quality"--the type who only build bronze fastened carvel and varnish it all--this might fill a need. We all know the type--engineers, systems analysts, lawyers. LOL I still prefer flea market/garage sale planes, and only bother to replace irons that are trashed.

Thanks for the info, Tom! A new way to spend money and rationalize it as saving money! I love having those...

Kermit
11-03-2000, 06:20 PM
I couldn't agree more that the old tools are often the best and for the best prices. I just thought that if there's someone out there anal enough to cut absolutely no corners on "quality"--the type who only build bronze fastened carvel and varnish it all--this might fill a need. We all know the type--engineers, systems analysts, lawyers. LOL I still prefer flea market/garage sale planes, and only bother to replace irons that are trashed.

Thanks for the info, Tom! A new way to spend money and rationalize it as saving money! I love having those...

Kermit
11-03-2000, 06:20 PM
I couldn't agree more that the old tools are often the best and for the best prices. I just thought that if there's someone out there anal enough to cut absolutely no corners on "quality"--the type who only build bronze fastened carvel and varnish it all--this might fill a need. We all know the type--engineers, systems analysts, lawyers. LOL I still prefer flea market/garage sale planes, and only bother to replace irons that are trashed.

Thanks for the info, Tom! A new way to spend money and rationalize it as saving money! I love having those...

Ross Faneuf
11-06-2000, 06:45 PM
And don't forget auctions; I recently picked up Bailey patterns #4 and #5 in excellent shape for less than $30 total.

Ross Faneuf
11-06-2000, 06:45 PM
And don't forget auctions; I recently picked up Bailey patterns #4 and #5 in excellent shape for less than $30 total.

Ross Faneuf
11-06-2000, 06:45 PM
And don't forget auctions; I recently picked up Bailey patterns #4 and #5 in excellent shape for less than $30 total.