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Old Dryfoot
01-17-2016, 10:37 PM
Linguine Aglio Olio, translated it means "linguine with garlic and oil," and it is one of my all time favorite pasta dishes. I add a few prawns to mine.

Once your pasta is cooked al dente, lightly saute the following to your own tastes. The chili flakes are optional but if you do use them, this dish is not about heat, use just enough to get that chili tingle and no more. DO NOT let your garlic brown. Some call for cheese, parm or pecorino, but try it first, I feel the cheese spoils it entirely. . .

Olive oil
Garlic
Chili flakes (optional)
Parsley
Salt & pepper to taste

I would have snapped a picture of mine, but I'm afraid it didn't last long enough for that. :D

http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/torXFPBhLlNGAD_ydHjT-23sa1my9OyNZG3kPpaXaBYJzjBrgvubM9FFOy5rE22xmAFfONz Cnw-3TQWmT7TiMw=s480-c-e365


Strawberry rhubarb pie for dessert. Yum!

seanz
01-17-2016, 10:40 PM
Living well.
:)

Durnik
01-17-2016, 10:43 PM
Looks goood.. & I just ate!

this > "DO NOT let your garlic brown"
It is purely amazing how many people seem to not understand that. I find that tossing it in the pan after turning off the heat (I use gas) & before stirring brings out the flavor - Wow! - without burning at all. (eta: I use cast iron, so the heat stays a bit..)

thanks
bobby

Old Dryfoot
01-17-2016, 11:33 PM
Living well.
:)

I keep trying!

Old Dryfoot
01-17-2016, 11:36 PM
Looks goood.. & I just ate!

this > "DO NOT let your garlic brown"
It is purely amazing how many people seem to not understand that. I find that tossing it in the pan after turning off the heat (I use gas) & before stirring brings out the flavor - Wow! - without burning at all. (eta: I use cast iron, so the heat stays a bit..)

thanks
bobby

I use some cast iron, this was done in SS nonstick over gas, almost instantaneous heat control. Gas can not be beat.

cathouse willy
01-17-2016, 11:57 PM
I saute whole cloves in their skins,once they're soft I crush them and peel them. I mix them with olive oil and coat the pasta. the prawns sound good although they're very expensive here.I like a bit of fresh ground parm and black pepper on mine.

elf
01-18-2016, 12:23 AM
Garlic turns somewhat sweet if you sauté it long enough without letting it turn brown around the edges.

Sort of the way onions turn sweet under the same regimen.

Joe (SoCal)
01-18-2016, 03:05 AM
Looks great ( your photo ? ) I agree with cheese ruining the purity of the dish.
I also highly agree with NEVER burning garlic, and the light hand on the red chili flakes makes the dish pop.

I'll add a few ideas.

Use EVOO good olive oil since this is essentially the "sauce" you wanna spluge on the quality stuff. Something that doesn't only just give you mouth feel but excites the nose and tingles the platelet.

Next there is a whole artform to cooking pasta correctly and achieving just the right al dente bite. Also the addition of salt to water to prevent sticking is a fallacy, adding salt to the water brings up the boiling point and adds saltiness. If you want to prevent sticking add a little olive oil. The The most important thing is not to rinse the pasta after you cook it. I never understood why people rinse it and wash off the good starch. Simply strain it and put it directly in the pan with the garlic, oil shrimp, coat and toss. I also add a little chiffonade of parsley

I love cooking threads ;)

Old Dryfoot
01-18-2016, 10:53 AM
Garlic turns somewhat sweet if you sauté it long enough without letting it turn brown around the edges.

Sort of the way onions turn sweet under the same regimen.

Garlic does have quite a range of flavors, enough so that you can even make ice cream with it.

Old Dryfoot
01-18-2016, 10:58 AM
Looks great ( your photo ? ) I agree with cheese ruining the purity of the dish.
I also highly agree with NEVER burning garlic, and the light hand on the red chili flakes makes the dish pop.

I'll add a few ideas.

Use EVOO good olive oil since this is essentially the "sauce" you wanna spluge on the quality stuff. Something that doesn't only just give you mouth feel but excites the nose and tingles the platelet.

Next there is a whole artform to cooking pasta correctly and achieving just the right al dente bite. Also the addition of salt to water to prevent sticking is a fallacy, adding salt to the water brings up the boiling point and adds saltiness. If you want to prevent sticking add a little olive oil. The The most important thing is not to rinse the pasta after you cook it. I never understood why people rinse it and wash off the good starch. Simply strain it and put it directly in the pan with the garlic, oil shrimp, coat and toss. I also add a little chiffonade of parsley

I love cooking threads ;)

No, not my photo, mine didn't last long enough to get a picture. That one is an afterthought.

Quality ingredients are key to any dish.

As to cooking the pasta, lots of water and attention is all that is needed to keep it from sticking. The salt, is for taste, nothing more. Also, please. . . no tossing it at the fridge to see if it's done.

CWSmith
01-18-2016, 11:14 AM
I've been trying to learn new pasta recipes, especially the ultra-fresh look of this, but I don't think I've got the hang of it. Red sauce can hide a lot of mistakes. That looks GREAT!

Norman Bernstein
01-18-2016, 11:14 AM
I love cooking threads ;)

Me too. I did essentially NO cooking until a couple of years ago, but got into it, and now, SWMBO does virtually none. I try to concentrate on dishes that will generate lots of leftovers, which I freeze in disposable containers, so that she has things to take for lunch, and on nights when there's no time to cook, we have something to fall back on, instead of 'take out'.

I cook instinctively, and don't really like recipes. If I want to try something new, I scan multiple recipes to get the basic idea, and then create my own formula. It doesn't always work, but it usually does.

So, I've collected a list of specialties which I've cooked repeatedly and which always come out fairly good:

Soups: I do a lot of soup. My best one is a loaded potato soup, but my vegetable soup is also well-regarded by the family. These all start with simmering vegetables in a scant amount of chicken stock, until the veggies are soft, and then blending with an immersion blender; the result is a thick base that really needs no seasoning except salt and pepper, to which I add stuff... I also do a simple tomato soup, based on San Marzano peeled plum tomatoes, simmered in chicken stock, which then get blended, and then I add a can of San Marzano diced tomatoes, for texture. I've found that the 'umami' of the tomato soup can be dramatically increased with the addition of some Worcestershire sauce, and a little hot sauce.

Chicken picatta and chicken marsala: I triple-butterfly the chicken breasts, instead of pounding them... a sharp chef's knife makes it easier. I coat them in gluten-free flour, and then saute them, and the sauce usually starts with diced onions and EVOO, and then chicken stock, with either capers and fresh lemons for picatta, or mushrooms and Marsala wine.

Mushroom Gorgonzola risotto.... with peas... delicious.

A bolognaise... I'm still working on this one. Some pancetta and onions, and a mix of ground veal, pork and beef, browned in the pot, along with a miripoix, some tomato paste, and chicken stock. I serve it over gluten-free pasta. Still trying to figure out how to thicken the bolognaise so that the liquid doesn't sink down into the pasta, leaving just the browned meat on the surface. The best restaurant bolognaise seems to employ 'minced' beef, pork ,and veal, rather than ground... still working on it.

Short ribs, braised in red wine. This one needs work, but I'm trying :)

Meatballs and sausage, onions and peppers, over pasta. Very easy. I like it with a red sauce, but SWMBO prefers it plain.

Joe (SoCal)
01-18-2016, 03:04 PM
Damn you go Norm :D - Lay down the Tomato soup recipe.

I got t a tequila, lime, cilantro pork shoulder in the crockpot for tonight :)

George Jung
01-18-2016, 03:07 PM
I'm hungry.

Bastids! :arg

Breakaway
01-18-2016, 04:26 PM
but excites the nose and tingles the platelet.

Sounds blood-curdlingly good! :d

Kevin

Norman Bernstein
01-18-2016, 04:36 PM
Damn you go Norm :D - Lay down the Tomato soup recipe.

I got t a tequila, lime, cilantro pork shoulder in the crockpot for tonight :)

I have not been pleased with the results of my crock pot experiments. We've done pork butts or shoulders in it... they come out nicely done and easy to shred, but the pot ends up with an enormous quantity of liquid fat, which I then have to dispose of.

paulf
01-18-2016, 04:41 PM
Garlic does have quite a range of flavors, enough so that you can even make ice cream with it.

AAAAH Garlic and virgin Olive oil....the ketchup of intellectuals!!!

Old Dryfoot
01-18-2016, 07:21 PM
AAAAH Garlic and virgin Olive oil....the ketchup of intellectuals!!!

:D I like that!

I know a snobbish chef or two that will hear that one.

Old Dryfoot
01-18-2016, 07:27 PM
"I cook instinctively, and don't really like recipes."

A recipe should be considered nothing more than a list of ingredients, if you ask me. Being a good cook is not a test of how well one can measure a tsp of basil, it's about knowing when you have enough basil.

Paul Pless
01-18-2016, 07:34 PM
Damn you go Norm :D - Lay down the Tomato soup recipe.

I got t a tequila, lime, cilantro pork shoulder in the crockpot for tonight :)

Cilantro? Essence of south american hippie armpit.

seanz
01-18-2016, 07:39 PM
Coriander is vastly superior to cilantro.

Paul Pless
01-18-2016, 07:41 PM
Subtle sean

Old Dryfoot
01-18-2016, 07:44 PM
I prefer to use Chinese parley.

seanz
01-18-2016, 07:48 PM
Subtle sean

Was not!
:D


I prefer to use Chinese parley.

I never use imported parsley. I only ever use locally-grown.



Speaking of which, your original post reminded me that if I looked hard I might find some parsley in our garden. So I did, and last nights pasta with tomato, tuna and olives was topped with fresh parsley, thanks to you. Cheers.