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View Full Version : Best glue for stainless steel to stainless steel.



goodbasil
01-17-2016, 12:28 AM
I googled the question, so of course every manufacture claims that their s is the best.
So I thought I'd ask here. It is to reattach the handle back onto my favorite coffee cup. ( So you can just imagine how important this is.) Will have to withstand some heat as well.

Anyone here have a recommendation ?

oznabrag
01-17-2016, 01:11 AM
My solution was a piece of aircraft mechanic's safety wire, but a trip to the welder's with a 12 pack in tow would have worked just as well.

There are adhesives used in the auto-body world that may answer, but my mental image of the surface area available for the bond does not look joyous.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
01-17-2016, 01:42 AM
JB Weld Steelstik.


http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0411/5921/products/8267_SteelStik_medium.jpg?v=1418307632



SteelStik is a hand-mixable, steel-reinforced, non-rusting epoxy putty that quickly repairs or rebuilds anything made of metal. After mixing, it forms an industrial-strength polymer compound that can be molded into shapes or used to build up, patch and repair steel components. SteelStik sets in 3-5 minutes and after 60 minutes, can be drilled, tapped, machined, ground, filed and painted. SteelStik cures to a dark grey color, is rated at a tensile strength of 900 PSI and will withstand temperatures up to 300F.

pipefitter
01-17-2016, 01:49 AM
Ohhhhh the stories I could tell, of all of the JB Weld I have had to remove in which to weld a busted part. :)

BrianW
01-17-2016, 01:52 AM
Drill holes in the cup and the handle, tap and thread the holes in the handle, screw handle to mug.

Not sure I could trust any glue with hot coffee. Too much potential for disaster.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
01-17-2016, 02:07 AM
Ohhhhh the stories I could tell, of all of the JB Weld I have had to remove in which to weld a busted part. :)


It's easy with a torch.;)

PeterSibley
01-17-2016, 02:27 AM
TIG.

Peerie Maa
01-17-2016, 06:47 AM
Drill holes in the cup and the handle, tap and thread the holes in the handle, screw handle to mug.

Not sure I could trust any glue with hot coffee. Too much potential for disaster.

Hoi, this is a wooden boat site. Drill and use copper rivets.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
01-17-2016, 07:10 AM
Double wall mug?

Paul Pless
01-17-2016, 07:52 AM
So you can just imagine how important this is.for something that important settle for no less than 5200. . .

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
01-17-2016, 07:54 AM
Backed by a jubilee clip

moTthediesel
01-17-2016, 08:28 AM
Hoi, this is a wooden boat site. Drill and use copper rivets.

Copper? With stainless steel? Oh, Sir -- the galvanic corrosion!

Peerie Maa
01-17-2016, 08:33 AM
Copper? With stainless steel? Oh, Sir -- the galvanic corrosion!

If he slops that much coffee he needs to buy a new mug http://www.completecareshop.co.uk/products/large/Dignity_Adult_Drinking_Cup.jpg

john l
01-17-2016, 09:58 AM
Try Araldite adhesives. http://www.huntsman.com/advanced_materials/a/Your%20Industry/Adhesives
I've used their industrial adhesives in a production setting. I recall that when I first sourced the adhesive and used it assembling a prototype, road and track magazine had an article on the Lotus Elise. They had fotos of the chassis being glued together with some secret adhesive. I think they even mentioned the unique color of the glue. At that point I realized that I speced the same adhesive as Lotus which reassured me on many levels! If it can hold up to 8.5Gs it should work for your coffee cup. It's also used in aviation to adhere skins to airframes and other things. While heat is a method to remove epoxy held parts, I believe there is an Araldite adhesive for the job. Not so sure on the price or if you can purchase industrial strength adhesives OTC. Call a sales rep and see if you could get a test sample.

john l
01-17-2016, 10:03 AM
Ps. I'll check to see if I have any tubes of Araldite in my stash. It would be over 10 years old and not sure about shelf life. But it I have it and you can't locate it locally, I'll mail you a tube. It's a 2 part tube which requires a fancy dispensing gun but you could cut open the tube and mix by hand.

Peerie Maa
01-17-2016, 10:17 AM
^ Unless they have bought out new resins Araldite is just a thick epoxy.

john l
01-17-2016, 11:42 AM
Yes, you're right, but it's compounded differently than your standard epoxy with fillers tuned to specific tasks.

Phillip Allen
01-17-2016, 11:54 AM
I have some epoxy made for the experimental aircraft use... but others have already come up with better ideas

Canoeyawl
01-17-2016, 11:58 AM
http://www.shanghaimetal.com/uploadfile/rivet%20washer/rivet/pop%20rivet/Pop-Rivet.jpg

Canoez
01-17-2016, 12:01 PM
A high temperature epoxy of some decent viscosity is what you want - like the JB Weld. The reason these joints fail is the oxide layer in the surface of the stainless that prevents rust and corrosion. The oxide layer prevents you from getting a good bond. Break the layer by abrading the bonding surface, clean well with alcohol and bond immediately. You should get an excellent bond joint if you do that.

PhaseLockedLoop
01-17-2016, 01:22 PM
^ Unless they have bought out new resins Araldite is just a thick epoxy.

There are a dozen or more of Araldite epoxy resins. Araldite GY6010 is an unmodified garden-variety 100% solids Bis A Diglycidyl Ether Resin. It was specified in Walbridges' Boatbuilder's Manuel 40 years ago, with Versamid 140 hardener. There's a basketfull of modified versions. Then there are a dozen or more hardeners you can use for various properties. Most of them have been around for the 30 years I've worked with them.

pipefitter
01-17-2016, 02:29 PM
I have never seen where JB weld held anything together structurally on it's own, or stood up to pressure. In spite of whatever fillers they boast, the resultant clump is of a mealy consistency at best. It's certainly not as strong as regular epoxy with alumina or cabosil, or even talcum powder added.

Many weld shops will have a spot welder that they can attach stamped or flanged bits with, which may be how the handle was attached in the first place.

Phillip Allen
01-17-2016, 02:31 PM
I have never seen where JB weld held anything together structurally on it's own, or stood up to pressure. In spite of whatever fillers they boast, the resultant clump is of a mealy consistency at best. It's certainly not as strong as regular epoxy with alumina or cabosil, or even talcum powder added.

Many weld shops will have a spot welder that they can attach stamped or flanged bits with, which may be how the handle was attached in the first place.

Brownells markets something called Accra-glass... never seen it to be beat but it's expensive

pipefitter
01-17-2016, 03:07 PM
Brownells markets something called Accra-glass... never seen it to be beat but it's expensive


They have adhesive that will hold the metal brackets for rear view mirrors to polished glass, but the joint and materials need to be designed accordingly. I have seen superglue fail, yet have had a bitch of a time getting a drop of it off of a knife blade that just landed there by chance.

pipefitter
01-17-2016, 03:14 PM
TIG.

That's how I would fix it. Something like this may not even need filler metal added. I have made TIG beads that would fit on the head of a sewing pin, and stainless welds are very strong, even just fused without filler.

A picture of the cup and the joint would help.

John Meachen
01-17-2016, 04:00 PM
I have a little experience with Araldite and raised temperatures and I remember the 2004 variant being quite good.Not sure it is still available.

paulf
01-17-2016, 04:03 PM
TIG.

Yes or MIG or stick weld.

Stiletto
01-17-2016, 05:09 PM
Stainless steel can be soldered if there is enough lap on the joint.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
01-17-2016, 08:42 PM
Why not just buy a new cup?
The last thing I want is hot coffee in my lap eh?

PhaseLockedLoop
01-18-2016, 10:24 AM
I have a little experience with Araldite and raised temperatures and I remember the 2004 variant being quite good.Not sure it is still available.

From Huntsman:

"Araldite specialty epoxy resins are typically based on bisphenol-A, bisphenol-F, phenol novolacs, cresol novolacs, amino phenol, methylene dianiline, cycloaliphatics, and isocyanuric acid."

That's a wide variety of very different resins. Novolics, for example, are nothing like Bis-A based resins. I'm only insisting on this because talking about "Araldite" as if it's a specific formulation is misleading.

Upshur
01-18-2016, 10:44 AM
dip a thin long strip of carbon into west systems and wrap around top of handle then all the way around the cup then looping around bottom of handle. Think I have one like that.

Todd D
01-18-2016, 10:46 AM
I would say weld it or silver solder it. Either will make a strong essentially permanent bond that won't be affected by temperature changes from putting hot coffee in the cup or washing. Any epoxy bond will fail due to the differential thermal expansion coefficients of epoxy and stainless steel.

Upshur
01-18-2016, 10:51 AM
That's how I would fix it. Something like this may not even need filler metal added. I have made TIG beads that would fit on the head of a sewing pin, and stainless welds are very strong, even just fused without filler.

A picture of the cup and the joint would help. Been wanting to get a TIG...any recommendations for a small one. Thanks

John Meachen
01-18-2016, 04:03 PM
From Huntsman: "Araldite specialty epoxy resins are typically based on bisphenol-A, bisphenol-F, phenol novolacs, cresol novolacs, amino phenol, methylene dianiline, cycloaliphatics, and isocyanuric acid." That's a wide variety of very different resins. Novolics, for example, are nothing like Bis-A based resins. I'm only insisting on this because talking about "Araldite" as if it's a specific formulation is misleading. Araldite 2004 http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/493512.pdf

pipefitter
01-18-2016, 11:19 PM
Been wanting to get a TIG...any recommendations for a small one. Thanks

Have heard good reviews about some of the Chinese offerings such as the "Everlast," if you are just going to dabble in it.

Personally, I opt for Miller machines but I no longer know why, since I am pretty sure that at least some of their electronics come from China anyway. I opted for a used, old (800.00) Miller machine because it will do both TIG and stick, the latter of which set the benchmark for stick welding machines and I have yet to use a newer one that stick welds as well as this one does. As a TIG it's a witch as well. It's a 300 amp machine with a 100% duty cycle at full amps. The newer offerings top out at about 60% IIRC. I also think a lot of newer machines are developed in part to be adapted to automation so that a lot of the capabilities are things most of us will never really need.

After welding for nearly the last 30 years, I am becoming more and more convinced that all of the new tech they are coming out with, is more of a correction/bug fix of the last new tech than anything really beneficial. At least with the every day type welding that most people do. Many of us were not having problems with the older machines, other than perhaps, power consumption. My machine will TIG weld aluminum overhead, as nice, or nicer than the newer machines do on the table. I currently use machines from 4 different decades. One of which, is Miller's new, top rated, inverter machine.

David W Pratt
01-19-2016, 07:39 AM
Clearly, the solution is for us to set up a fund to buy a bunch of similar cups, break off the handles and try all the suggestions.
Perhaps competing methods with their handles intertwined, then pulled on to see which failed first...

Canoez
01-19-2016, 09:21 AM
I have never seen where JB weld held anything together structurally on it's own, or stood up to pressure. In spite of whatever fillers they boast, the resultant clump is of a mealy consistency at best. It's certainly not as strong as regular epoxy with alumina or cabosil, or even talcum powder added.

Many weld shops will have a spot welder that they can attach stamped or flanged bits with, which may be how the handle was attached in the first place.

While I agree with you that a bonded joint will not be as strong as a good weld, There are some great adhesives out there. I used to work at a company that made optical instruments and we had to design parts that would be held together with adhesives with materials that included a variety of metals, plastics and glass. The units had to be functional after cycling in an autoclave (both high pressure AND high temperature). It is do-able. Not everybody has a welder around for fixing their mugs. ;)

woodpile
01-19-2016, 09:50 AM
I would say weld it or silver solder it. Either will make a strong essentially permanent bond that won't be affected by temperature changes from putting hot coffee in the cup or washing. Any epoxy bond will fail due to the differential thermal expansion coefficients of epoxy and stainless steel.

Yep, w/HT 316, AMS 5960 welding rod.

varadero
01-19-2016, 09:57 AM
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