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Jim Bow
01-14-2016, 05:01 PM
My brother got a ride home from work the other day. As they were driving through the city of Shoreline, WA, the driver came to an abrupt halt and pulled into a drug store parking lot.
He pointed to an old Toyota pickup and said that it was his truck from the 1990s and that he sold it in Colorado.
He walked up, and the owner came out of the store.
It WAS his former truck, and the ViseGrips clamped to the broken shift lever were still in place.

Garret
01-14-2016, 06:06 PM
Someone here has a tag line like "There is nothing quite so permanent as a good temporary repair."

I saw an old Ford PU in a parking lot that looked familiar. When I got closer, I saw that the broken hood release cable was routed through the grille & still had my old key ring on it for a finger pull. I'd sold it (in the same state) 5 years earlier.

oznabrag
01-14-2016, 06:17 PM
Sort of similar, but not quite . . .

In the early 90s, I had a 1964 ford pickup with a broken fuel gauge.

One afternoon I left work and began the long haul home, when the truck began to run about as badly as possible, while still making it down the road. I acted like it was running out of gas, but I had put a few gallons in that morning, soooo . . .

My mind was racing, it was 10 miles to the nearest gas station, and my co-worker had to not mess up getting to the visitation with his kid that day, soooo . . .

My girl at the time insisted that I keep a bottle of isopropyl alcohol with me to treat a persistent problem with earwax build up.

There it was, on the dashboard!

I rolled down my window, reached over my shoulder, unscrewed the gas cap, and poured the alcohol into the tank.

Within 150 feet, she started to get her legs under her, and a 1/4 mile later all the symptoms of water in the gas were gone.

I fixed my truck without even stopping.

:ycool:

Jim Bow
01-14-2016, 09:13 PM
Greatest of all is the guy from Seattle who bought an old beater Jeepster when he was in college. He drove it to Yosemite where he broke down. Had to spend some precious dollars having it towed to a station, wondering the whole time whether he should abandon it. A car followed him into the station and an elderly man got out. It was the Jeepster he bought in 1949. He recognized some holes he had drilled in the bumper to mount a luggage rack. He bought it back for more than the worried college kid had paid, and he paid for the tow. (I'm remembering this from an article in the Times a few years ago.

oznabrag
01-14-2016, 09:19 PM
Greatest of all is the guy from Seattle who bought an old beater Jeepster when he was in college. He drove it to Yosemite where he broke down. Had to spend some precious dollars having it towed to a station, wondering the whole time whether he should abandon it. A car followed him into the station and an elderly man got out. It was the Jeepster he bought in 1949. He recognized some holes he had drilled in the bumper to mount a luggage rack. He bought it back for more than the worried college kid had paid, and he paid for the tow. (I'm remembering this from an article in the Times a few years ago.

That right there is bordering on the truly awesome.

CK 17
01-14-2016, 09:36 PM
In the early 80s sometime I sold a dodge duster, 3 on the tree shifter to the guy that collected our garbage. The unibody construction had rusted so much the vehicle sagged in the middle. The shifter mechanism under the hood on the steering colum was wrapped in bailing wire to hold it together.

5 years later I returned for a visit and there it went. I was horrified.

The Bigfella
01-15-2016, 01:18 AM
A personal favourite. We were in the middle of nowhere, on the Death Highway in Cambodia. Old Mate came along, going the other way, so we all stopped for a break. Check out the temporary repair to the spark plug wire. Who needs high tension wire when a bit of low tension and some bamboo will do?

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff112/igatenby/Cambodia/019_zpsbbb26a1d.jpg (http://s240.photobucket.com/user/igatenby/media/Cambodia/019_zpsbbb26a1d.jpg.html)

His bike had done some work in its time.... a bit like him

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff112/igatenby/Cambodia/018_zps526c2f31.jpg (http://s240.photobucket.com/user/igatenby/media/Cambodia/018_zps526c2f31.jpg.html)

The Bigfella
01-15-2016, 01:29 AM
One from my uni days. My 1958 VW Beetle snapped an accelerator cable. I unhooked the choke cable and put it in the accelerator cable position. No worries... drove home with a hand throttle. New cable, problem solved.

4 1/2 years ago... 20 km from the Tip (the northernmost part of Australia.... a very remote area), the Mitsubishi fuel pump on my bike broke. Used some spare hose to re-route fuel lines around the pump and relied on gravity feed for the next 1,500 km of riding. It meant that I could only use half the fuel in the tank... 15 litres of the 30 that I was carrying, but with an 8 litre fuel bladder, I had a range of 300 kilometres.

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
01-15-2016, 03:59 AM
During a brake job on my Dodge Truck I realized my Caliper bolts were spinning and the holes were stripped.
I used JB Weld to temporarily fasten the bolts.
Lasted six months, until I could afford to fix it right.
Great stuff.


http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0411/5921/products/8265-S_J-B_Weld-USA_grande_5f045738-0350-44e1-8938-c67ac12c1dcf.jpg?v=1426776893

Bobby of Tulsa
01-15-2016, 04:48 AM
During a brake job on my Dodge Truck I realized my Caliper bolts were spinning and the holes were stripped.
I used JB Weld to temporarily fasten the bolts.
Lasted six months, until I could afford to fix it right.
Great stuff.


http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0411/5921/products/8265-S_J-B_Weld-USA_grande_5f045738-0350-44e1-8938-c67ac12c1dcf.jpg?v=1426776893 Heck Kevin, ya coulda just took the brake line loose put a nail in it and done the three brake thing. Not that I ever did such a thing.:)

Jim Mahan
01-15-2016, 08:06 AM
About '93, in my '69 BMW 2002, at the bottom of an off-ramp, the motor suddenly just sputtered and quit. When I checked under the hood, I found a little L-shaped steel part in the distributor was broken. The part screwed into the side of the distributor and had a cup shaped end that held a ball-bearing, that kept pressure on the movable spark advance plates. Without the plates being held in place (to pivot for advancing the spark) the cam just bounced the plates and no spark happened. I always carried my tool box in that car, and I had one of those springs with the rubber end that screws into a baseboard to keep a door from banging against the wall. In a house. No baseboards in a car.

I clipped it short and bent one loop of the spring ninety degrees and screwed it in place of the broken piece. It held the plate in place, with just enough force, and the wire had almost no friction, the engine ran fine, and I got back to work in good time. After work it still ran okay, so I drove home, and then got involved in something else, next morning I got all the way to work before I remembered the fix. For the first couple of weeks I was concerned that I couldn't make it to the parts place with enough dough for new piece. After a while I relaxed a bit, and it stayed that way for at least six monthss until I could afford to fix it. Of course I couldn't find just the little piece. So, adhering to my principle when owning a relic, I replaced the whole distributor with a performance upgrade.

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
01-15-2016, 08:33 AM
Best one I've seen was on an early eighties Suzuki 400 twin:
,
The electronic ignition had failed so the ingenious owner had drilled the crankcase cover, extended a bolt from the alternator puller bolt hole and fitted an external set of points.

It ran.