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Joe (SoCal)
01-13-2016, 11:21 PM
Herb infused rotisserie chicken and and garlic roasted brussels sprouts.

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/F5CC508A-1768-49C6-96C3-2206038FBA16_zpsrpyoxjsd.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/F5CC508A-1768-49C6-96C3-2206038FBA16_zpsrpyoxjsd.jpg.html)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/F08CE2EC-2C8B-4B06-9ABA-CF680B68DE9D_zpsdgvm35dc.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/F08CE2EC-2C8B-4B06-9ABA-CF680B68DE9D_zpsdgvm35dc.jpg.html)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/4C8034BD-9A97-4FCA-B84D-3FC4E7CAA26F_zpsig1cmb04.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/4C8034BD-9A97-4FCA-B84D-3FC4E7CAA26F_zpsig1cmb04.jpg.html)

And leftovers turn into chicken soup

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/8B75FF3B-0C92-4416-B375-C35E510BAE2F_zps7ia58lg7.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/8B75FF3B-0C92-4416-B375-C35E510BAE2F_zps7ia58lg7.jpg.html)

BETTY-B
01-14-2016, 01:13 AM
I did almost the exact same meal. Except I de-boned some thighs. Clipped some of the neighbors rosemary, mixed it with some bread crumbs and parm and baked it. The Brussels sprouts I did by pan frying the face for a couple minutes after tossing with onions and olive oil and S&P. Then into the oven with the chicken. Threw some bacon chunks in there and mixed them up with a squirt of lemon and a splash of balsamic oil for the last few minutes.

Captain Intrepid
01-14-2016, 02:36 AM
Very nice! I don't have a rotisserie, so I spatchcock my bird and dry brine it with salt and a little bit of baking powder, crisps up the skin magnificently.

Joe (SoCal)
01-14-2016, 08:41 AM
So I prep the chicken with aromatics (fresh rosemary, thyme, & oregano ), put Lemon halves, rosemary sprigs, kosher salt, black pepper and garlic in the cavity. I make a aromatic infused butter with salt, pepper, garlic, rosemary etc and bush the skin with it. Pop in the rotisserie for 2 hrs.

Brussel sprouts are steamed first. I put some more aromatics in the water. Strain into a bowl with minced garlic and olive oil, kosher salt, black pepper and put on a oven sheet and broil checking to turn.

Chris Smith porter maine
01-14-2016, 09:01 AM
Your on a roll Joe, I seriously need to up my dinner game.

Captain Intrepid
01-14-2016, 12:08 PM
Damn, post got lost in the intertubes, I'll retype it.

I'm hosting a dinner party saturday for a few friends, so I guess this is the place to brag.

Starting with a cheese plate, then stuffed mushroom caps, half of em Italian sausage with a little fennel and cheese, half escargot for the more advenderous, smothered in garlic and butter. Next, a thin basil heavy tomato soup. Main is a 7 pound top sirloin roast I'm going to do low and slow, with a reverse sear to bring it to medium - medium rare. That's going in the fridge tonight with a dry rub wrapped in cheesecloth to start dry brining. Dessert is a simple very creamy baked cheesecake flavoured with just a little lemon zest. Lubrication is my homemade merlot, cab sav, gewürztraminer, and orange chocolate port.

Good food is an end in itself.

ccmanuals
01-14-2016, 12:37 PM
Dinner last night.

https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/12552871_1255937387766075_3254986576404226532_n.jp g?oh=f7d7fe1889db5733650ff84d106ae389&oe=5708DEE6

Joe (SoCal)
01-14-2016, 12:56 PM
Tom are those gulf coast oysters. Renee has become infatuated with west coast oysters, Hama Hama and Kumamoto's

ccmanuals
01-14-2016, 01:08 PM
Tom are those gulf coast oysters. Renee has become infatuated with west coast oysters, Hama Hama and Kumamoto's

These were gulf coast oysters. West coast oysters are also very good.

Joe (SoCal)
01-14-2016, 01:15 PM
These were gulf coast oysters. West coast oysters are also very good.

I remember eating dozens and dozens of apalachicola oysters and cold beer at a dive bar off the tourist area in Key West - good times :)

ccmanuals
01-14-2016, 02:24 PM
I remember eating dozens and dozens of apalachicola oysters and cold beer at a dive bar off the tourist area in Key West - good times :)

yep, best when they are really cold, a little salty and fresh. I have to have a strong horseradish sauce and of course some saltine crackers.

David G
01-15-2016, 11:09 PM
I made chicken too. The lazy way. Boneless, skinless thighs - 10 hours in the slow-cooker with basil, garlic, sake, celery, potatoes, carrots, and onions. Mighty tasty. Fudge brownie ice cream for dessert.

Paul Pless
01-19-2016, 04:37 PM
gonna do a baked pasta dish tonight with a béchamel mornay sauce and jumbo lump crab meat and seared bits of pork belly
otherwise known as baked mac and cheese with crab and bacon :D

but while technically i'm correct in calling my base roux a béchamel sauce, I never like to pass up on the chance of being called a food snob by Phillip Allen

switters
01-19-2016, 04:56 PM
left over smoked salmon,

tried out the new masterbuilt electric over the weekend and smoked a whole coho for the game on Sunday.

my new favorite toy.

CK 17
01-19-2016, 05:10 PM
Rosemary roasted potatoes, with stir fried tofu and veggies, mushrooms. . .

http://s20.postimg.org/jfbvcfbct/IMG_20160119_160533_376.jpg

Joe (SoCal)
01-19-2016, 05:26 PM
Thinking of some Grass Fed Strip Steaks tonight with haricot vert.
Prepared simply rubbed with garlic dusted with kosher salt and seared on a cast iron pan thats been building heat.
Strings beans in butter, white wine, garlic.

David G
01-19-2016, 07:43 PM
Fritatta. Bacon, brown rice, spinach, garlic, fresh dill snipped from the hydroponic lab, cheddar. Rye toast alongside. Porter.

Paul Pless
01-19-2016, 07:45 PM
Fritatta.because real men don't eat quiche. . .

Figment
01-19-2016, 08:21 PM
If I'm going frittata over quiche, it's because I'm watching my calories. Like a man.

Norman Bernstein
01-19-2016, 08:23 PM
I made chicken piccata tonight... Served with some risotto. Got rave reviews from SWMBO.

David G
01-19-2016, 08:24 PM
because real men don't eat quiche. . .

Oops... I may not be, then. I eat quiche. And crepes. And brie. And white wine. Among other things. <G>

Joe (SoCal)
01-19-2016, 09:34 PM
Grass fed strip steak, with a port wine and shallot reduction, with haricot vert steamed with fresh herbs.

Yea I had to elevate the dish with the port wine shallot reduction ;)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/2BA41B56-B195-4B78-A28C-28A2B8497CFC_zpstqgjcylr.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/2BA41B56-B195-4B78-A28C-28A2B8497CFC_zpstqgjcylr.jpg.html)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/9C51E1C0-9ED8-427F-881C-8EB06197C5AA_zps7skvpeeg.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/9C51E1C0-9ED8-427F-881C-8EB06197C5AA_zps7skvpeeg.jpg.html)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/07CB8C05-FE03-432C-8E9B-47D40560177D_zpsnt8mdyet.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/07CB8C05-FE03-432C-8E9B-47D40560177D_zpsnt8mdyet.jpg.html)

Sky Blue
01-19-2016, 09:39 PM
I'm wondering about the sweetness of that sauce. Too sweet?

Chip-skiff
01-19-2016, 09:46 PM
West coast oysters are also very good.

Hard to get decent oysters in Wyoming, but the fishmonger at Safeway said she took a shipment from Washington that morning, so I got a dozen. Just bought a Murphy oyster knife and learned to shuck them, which doesn't require genius or great skill. (Even a New Yorker could do it.) I took the irregular ones (L) and gave the perfect ones to the Wolf Goddess.

We don't need cracked ice or cocktail sauce or lemon. Just crusty bread, butter, and a dewy glass of sauv blanc.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-aIBMLDcZpAg/Vp7yo7oWJcI/AAAAAAAAJr0/pONzkRkZ8HY/s850-Ic42/oysters.jpg

They were quite a bit better than the Chesapeake oysters I got last time I was in Colorado. I'll try not to go overboard. Twice a month is a treat.

Joe (SoCal)
01-19-2016, 09:51 PM
I'm wondering about the sweetness of that sauce. Too sweet?

No surprising it wasn't. This honestly was my first attempt. Renee had received a nice bottle of vintage Taylor as a christmas tip 2 years ago and I decided to go for it.

I started a heated pan with good irish butter and added shredded shallots until they caramelized added some Kosher salt and fresh rosemary and thyme . After I pulled the steaks from the cast iron pan I added the mixture to the pan juice and then added about a cup and a half of port. It was amazing how fast it reduced down to a nice AMAZINGLY flavorful sauce. Think of the best steak sauce you've ever had served warm. Good Stuff :D

David G
01-19-2016, 09:53 PM
Yes, not hard to shuck oysters. All you need to know is the location of the adductor muscle, and have enough dexterity to insert the blade and slice it loose. Don't rip open your hands on the shells or the knife. Quick & easy with a minimal of practice. After trying oysters every which way I've every heard of.... I've yet to find one I didn't like. My favorite, though, is still breaded & pan-fried. The way momma used to make 'em.

Sky Blue
01-19-2016, 09:58 PM
Yes, the sauce looks fabulous and I like the thicker viscosity when there is no starch and it just dresses the steak. You've got a healthy, light meal going there, with the sauce lending a rich, decadent touch. I'd like to try it. :)

Joe (SoCal)
01-19-2016, 09:59 PM
Yes, not hard to shuck oysters. All you need to know is the location of the adductor muscle, and have enough dexterity to insert the blade and slice it loose. Don't rip open your hands on the shells or the knife. Quick & easy with a minimal of practice. After trying oysters every which way I've every heard of.... I've yet to find one I didn't like. My favorite, though, is still breaded & pan-fried. The way momma used to make 'em.

It's all easy until the oyster slips and the shell cuts you it's never the dull knife the cuts you.

You haven't Lived until you've had the Grand Central Oyster Bar's oyster pan roast

https://joncrispin.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/oyster-bar2.jpg

Below, the elements of the Grand Central Oyster Bar's oyster pan roast:
1. The Stew

The stew begins with clam juice that has been fortified with clam base. Ingber explains that because of the tremendous volume, the restaurant uses high-end pre-made clam juice and clam base, instead of making them in house. The fortified clam juice is added to the pan with unsalted butter. After that comes to a boil, the oysters are added, and then rest of the stew ingredients: celery salt, Worcestershire sauce, paprika, Heinz chili sauce, and half and half. Ingber explains that each component is a vital contributor to the overall flavor of the dish. Celery salt is the only salt added to the dish, while just a few dashes of Worcestershire balance out the brine of the clam juice and the oysters themselves. Ingber says the tomato-based chili sauce — also a key component of the cocktail sauce at the Oyster Bar — adds a tangy kick without being overly spicy. It also adds body and a pinkish tint to the stew, with paprika rounding out the flavors. Ingber uses half and half to add a rich, silky texture to the stew, finding cream on its own to be too heavy.
2. The Oysters

The star ingredients of the stew are six shucked Blue Point oysters. Ingber explains that Blue Points are mild, but with enough brininess to add flavor to the stew. That brine also imparts a necessary saltiness to the stew. While Blue Points work well from a flavor perspective, Ingber explains that there's more to the decision than just taste. He explains that since the Grand Central Oyster Bar is such a New York City icon, many diners are tourists looking for a full-blown "New York City experience." He explains that Blue Point oysters have the most name recognition of any of the East Coast oysters and are the restaurant's best-selling oyster some five times over. With that in mind, including Blue Points in the pan roast is another way to keep it quintessentially New York, as the oysters hail from the Long Island Sound.



3. The Assembly

One of the signature components of the dish is the stainless steel steam-jacketed kettle in which it is prepared. This pan is similar to a double boiler, with steam being released in between an outer steel wall and an inner steel wall that hold the contents of the pan. Ingber explains that the high heat steam accelerates the cooking process, which is critical because both the dairy and the oysters in the stew can overcook easily.
Ingber estimates that from start to finish, cooking the pan roast takes only three minutes or so. The entire dish is assembled and cooked in the pan, beginning with the fortified clam juice and butter. When that comes to a boil, the raw oysters are added. When the oysters are about half-way done, the paprika, celery salt, and Worcestershire sauce are added. The pan is turned, and then the chili sauce goes in. Shortly before the oysters are completely cooked the half and half is added. In the meanwhile, a soup bowl is prepped with a piece of white toast that's been cut into triangles. The finished oysters are removed from the stew and placed directly on top of the toast. Ingber explains that after the half and half is added, the stew must not be allowed to boil again or else the half and half will break. To prevent that from happening, the stew is poured directly over the oysters and toast just as it is about to reach a boil. The last step is to finish the soup with a bit of paprika and serve it with Westminster Oyster Crackers.

Chip-skiff
01-19-2016, 10:01 PM
Have you tried the reverse method for steaks? Good for steaks at least 1" or preferably thicker.

Preheat the oven to 250°F. Pat the steaks dry with a paper towel (kosher salt optional) and place in a pan with a rack, turning at about 15 minutes and slow-cooking until the meat thermometer reads 190°F.

Sear the steaks in butter in a hot skillet on all sides (use tongs to do the edges) and serve immediately.

Restaurant perfect. No gray zone: medium rare meat with a dark, seared crust.

I've made reduction sauces using half dry red wine and half fruit juice (pomegranate, currant, cherry). Very rich and savoury, but not sweet.

Chip-skiff
01-19-2016, 10:08 PM
The Grand Central oyster stew sounds good. That's the traditional Christmas Eve meal in my wife's family. Now that I can shuck oysters, it should take a major leap in terms of quality.

(I got those no-cut gloves, but have no problem gripping the oysters— they're pretty rough, and the essential actions are wiggling the point in, twisting to pop the hinge, and shearing/scraping to detach the shell. Not a great deal of brute force involved. The only incident so far was a thin-shelled oyster that shattered in my grip.)

Joe (SoCal)
01-19-2016, 10:15 PM
Yes, the sauce looks fabulous and I like the thicker viscosity when there is no starch and it just dresses the steak. You've got a healthy, light meal going there, with the sauce lending a rich, decadent touch. I'd like to try it. :)

I agree and in all honesty is was a lot thicker than it appeared much thicker than my usual pan juices.

coelacanth2
01-19-2016, 10:44 PM
Nippy here tonight. Raw, damp cold. Got home after my workout ( kinda light one but I needed the break) for a nice heavy pea soup. Ham chunks and a bit of corn, carrots and pasta. Toasted buttered roll on the side and an orange for dessert. Darn good.

Im going to try that steak-in-the-oven technique. Thanks, all.

ccmanuals
01-19-2016, 10:48 PM
My wife uses a calphalon grill pan for steaks, chicken etc. and they come out great. Even have the nice grill marks.

http://werkkzeug.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/calphalon-grill-pan-4.jpg

J P
01-20-2016, 04:29 AM
Have you tried the reverse method for steaks? Good for steaks at least 1" or preferably thicker.

Preheat the oven to 250°F. Pat the steaks dry with a paper towel (kosher salt optional) and place in a pan with a rack, turning at about 15 minutes and slow-cooking until the meat thermometer reads 190°F.

Sear the steaks in butter in a hot skillet on all sides (use tongs to do the edges) and serve immediately.

Restaurant perfect. No gray zone: medium rare meat with a dark, seared crust.


Im going to try that steak-in-the-oven technique. Thanks, all.

190°F (!?) and the steaks will be good for pemmican. :)

Suggest ~130°F for medium rare.

Joe (SoCal)
01-22-2016, 09:08 PM
Herb roasted chicken in pan juice. With sage glazed new potatoes and carrots and garlic sauté spinach.

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/t31.0-8/12605566_10206834885924163_8766730448073826919_o.j pg

Paul Pless
01-22-2016, 09:10 PM
cooking burgers with the works and fries

CWSmith
01-22-2016, 09:13 PM
Two nights ago my wife made rice and beans (and corn, tomato and cheese). We've had leftovers twice and now it's gone. It's simple, delicious, and it gets better every night (because she keeps adding cheese). :)

Joe (SoCal)
01-22-2016, 09:15 PM
cooking burgers with the works and fries

Stuff them and use a little soy sauce ;)

David G
01-22-2016, 09:17 PM
Eating tamales I bought last night from a street vendor.

Captain Intrepid
01-22-2016, 09:49 PM
Stuff them and use a little soy sauce ;)

A little soy sauce, fish sauce and worcestershire sauce. The holy trinity of umami.

Joe (SoCal)
01-23-2016, 09:20 AM
Snowed in with enough milk & eggs ;) . Thinking about Banana Pancakes with caramelized pecans and good Nespresso coffee :D

Norman Bernstein
01-23-2016, 09:27 AM
Probably will do my loaded potato soup today.... perfect for snow.

CWSmith
01-23-2016, 09:40 AM
Snowed in with enough milk & eggs ;) . Thinking about Banana Pancakes with caramelized pecans and good Nespresso coffee :D

What's the deal with that coffee? It looks like a simple K-cup machine.

Joe (SoCal)
01-23-2016, 10:02 AM
What's the deal with that coffee? It looks like a simple K-cup machine.

Comparing the fine Nespresso ARPEGGIO I'm enjoying INTENSE AND CREAMY: A dark roast of pure South and Central American Arabicas,Arpeggio has a strong character and intense body, enhanced by cocoa notes.

https://www.nespresso.com/ecom/medias/sys_master/public/9908072546334/Intenso-Arpeggio_Main_684x378.jpg

To a K-cup is like comparing a 1958 LAFITE ROTHSCHILD to a Bud Lite ;)

Paul Pless
01-26-2016, 08:12 PM
a bit of an experiment tonight (for me at least)
I make quiche pretty often, usually fairly traditional ones
tonight though is a creole inspired (flavor wise) shrimp quiche
not to go too far out on a limb i did add bacon, its smells awesome, fix'n to come out of the oven. . .

S.V. Airlie
01-26-2016, 08:17 PM
Experimenting is good, tell me tomorrow Paul!:)

CWSmith
01-26-2016, 09:15 PM
Every time I open this thread I start wanting oysters.

Joe (SoCal)
01-28-2016, 04:55 PM
Eggplant Rollatini

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/v/t1.0-9/12654250_10206872280699009_5561393573283002988_n.j pg?oh=a31f522ad0b633257fc4d6ca19bdf83a&oe=573F5D1E

Paul Pless
01-28-2016, 05:27 PM
Every time I open this thread I start wanting oysters.

prettiest oyster i ever did see. . .

http://41.media.tumblr.com/1a3b1e187159a1b1c8ee500d2da5b42d/tumblr_nmi3eqGzNG1qaap4wo1_500.jpg

Joe (SoCal)
01-28-2016, 05:29 PM
Paul have I ever told you about my first date oyster test ;)

Paul Pless
01-28-2016, 05:32 PM
Paul have I ever told you about my first date oyster test ;)go for it

Joe (SoCal)
01-28-2016, 05:58 PM
go for it

If she eats raw oysters .........gulp ;) Thats about as close as I can get without getting banned,

Needless to say I always ordered the oyster raw bar ;)

Joe (SoCal)
01-28-2016, 05:58 PM
Eggplant Rollatini

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/v/t1.0-9/12654250_10206872280699009_5561393573283002988_n.j pg?oh=a31f522ad0b633257fc4d6ca19bdf83a&oe=573F5D1E

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xat1/v/t1.0-9/12647028_10206872774911364_7283098968407543872_n.j pg?oh=eb24bc6e8e98d1ecb56bdd1a7d4e3034&oe=573A1F1F

Katherine
01-28-2016, 06:00 PM
a bit of an experiment tonight (for me at least)
I make quiche pretty often, usually fairly traditional ones
tonight though is a creole inspired (flavor wise) shrimp quiche
not to go too far out on a limb i did add bacon, its smells awesome, fix'n to come out of the oven. . .It was REALLY yummy!

Katherine
01-28-2016, 06:01 PM
Paul have I ever told you about my first date oyster test ;)I love Paul's oyster stew, but have a problem eating raw oysters.

Joe (SoCal)
01-28-2016, 06:03 PM
I love Paul's oyster stew, but have a problem eating raw oysters.

Sorry Paul :(

CWSmith
01-28-2016, 06:06 PM
If she eats raw oysters .........gulp ;) Thats about as close as I can get without getting banned,

Needless to say I always ordered the oyster raw bar ;)

I guess you don't want to try that same test with shrimp. :) It might send the wrong message.

Katherine
01-28-2016, 06:06 PM
Sorry Paul :(Paul has nothing to complain about.

S.V. Airlie
01-28-2016, 06:07 PM
I love Paul's oyster stew, but have a problem eating raw oysters.I like 'em anyway! I don't like oyster shots though!

Memphis Mike
01-28-2016, 06:11 PM
TMI

Chip-skiff
01-28-2016, 06:21 PM
Italian sausage, chopped onion and bell pepper sauteed with Romesco sauce (garlic, bread, almonds, roasted red peppers, and smoked paprika) with diced black olives and fresh parsley added at the end, served over penne in a nest of arugula/roquette. Too busy cooking for a photo. With Bogle Old Vine zinfandel (one of our modestly priced favourites).

Romesco is a Catalan sauce most often eaten with fish, but it's good with other things. Keeps well in the freezer.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/romesco-sauce-232504

S.V. Airlie
01-28-2016, 06:24 PM
TMIHere ya go Mike!:)

http://media.salon.com/2013/09/shutterstock_117823822.jpg

Memphis Mike
01-28-2016, 06:55 PM
The only time I was ever able to eat them is when I was drunk. Since I'm walkin the straight and narrow again, they're off limits.

delecta
01-28-2016, 06:58 PM
You had me until the almonds and I would change your choice of olives other then that rock it.

S.V. Airlie
01-28-2016, 07:02 PM
The only time I was ever able to eat them is when I was drunk. Since I'm walkin the straight and narrow again, they're off limits.I can understand that! Hey when I was surveying osprey and flying with a guy from the F&W Service helping me out, I spent a lot of time taking notes. Was beginning to get airsick! The pilot looked at me and offered a peanut butter cookie, I almost lost it. Can't even look at one now but, like peanut butter.

Joe (SoCal)
02-01-2016, 07:49 PM
Skirt Steak & Camarones tonight with Renee at Noches De Colombia
the chimichurri and green chili sauce is excellent.

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/12654137_10206897684134079_2148917870061473541_n.j pg?oh=0dffb81b4c9e74001103d25b1eee5f37&oe=573DBA67

CWSmith
02-01-2016, 07:54 PM
The Mrs. made an excellent stew! Fortunately, there is enough for several more nights.

The Bigfella
02-02-2016, 08:53 AM
My friend Auke was returning my GPS today, so we decided to do it over dinner at the Korean BBQ, just down the road.

It's a bit different to the adjacent Thai one that I went to last week. There's no water trough on the hotplate. Same basic deal though... all you can eat, but a bit dearer at 169 baht (vs 159 next door). That's $2.

I kicked off with the freshwater prawns, whilst Auke went funghi and meat

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-798pKvn/0/X2/20160202_181043_resized-X2.jpg

Bit of pig fat on there too, to grease the plate.

Some beef, bacon, pork, pineapple and so on... onions, marinated pork ribs, calamari, greens, etc, etc. Diet be buggered.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-WFmnxP5/0/X2/20160202_184348_resized-X2.jpg

Now, what was Joe saying about uni students? No beer goggles here. Nope.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-d5qxHMX/0/X2/20160202_193549_resized-X2.jpg

Oh yeah... forgot to get the GPS. Have to do it all again tomorrow.

Joe (SoCal)
02-03-2016, 09:05 PM
What's for dinner fresh herb encrusted chicken thighs in pan juice with sautéed spinach

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpt1/t31.0-8/12646891_10206910334250324_2494531796008995527_o.j pg

Norman Bernstein
02-05-2016, 09:39 AM
Bolognaise!

We start by sweating a miripoix (carrots, celery, onions)... I use Vidalia onions, which are large, sweet onions; they used to be hard to find and seasonal, but in the past few years, they've become common and easy to get, and very cheap: $1/lb yesterday.

http://www.marisystems.com/images/bol1.jpg

After the veggies are soft, but not browned, I transfer them to a bowl, and brown the meat. A traditional bolognaise calls for pancetta, to give it a bit of a smoky flavor. Unfortunately, I can't get pancetta at my local supermarkets (I'd have to drive to my daughter's town, where there's a market that has it). I've tried substituting bacon, but have settled, instead, on using some ground sweet sausage meat. I brown a half pound of it, and then brown 2 lbs of a mix of ground veal, pork, and beef, which fortunately is easy to come by, already packaged. There was a sale on it yesterday; buy one, get one free, and each one had a $3 off coupon, so 2 lbs cost me all of $3.

http://www.marisystems.com/images/bol2.jpg

After the meat is browned, I return the miripoix to the same pot, and add a generous splash of good red wine (pinot noir is what was available yesterday), a small can of tomato paste, some rosemary and thyme, and some additional chicken stock, and let it simmer for an hour or so, on a very low heat. A traditional bolognaise tends to separate, which does not affect the flavor, but I prefer to thicken mine with a cornstarch slurry, so it clings to the pasta better.

http://www.marisystems.com/images/bol3.jpg

The result is a thick, flavorful sauce which we serve over pasta (gluten-free, which is made from corn and rice, and is actually quite good... you'd never know it wasn't made from wheat, there's no clue in the flavor).

The recipe makes enough for two generous dinner servings, plus enough left over to create 5 or 6 disposable plastic containers, each good for a generous lunch or a modest dinner. This way, I only cook like this perhaps 2-3 times per week... the rest of the week, we just go to the freezer, pop a package into the microwave for 7 minutes, and have a great meal.

Joe (SoCal)
02-05-2016, 09:58 AM
Way to go Norman
EXCELLENT !!!!!
I'm gonna try that recipe, still not happy with the electric stove ;)

Norman Bernstein
02-05-2016, 10:00 AM
Way to go Norman
EXCELLENT !!!!!
I'm gonna try that recipe, still not happy with the electric stove ;)

*shrugs* Ya gotta work with what ya got, Joe. Compared to my sister's brand new gas cooktop, I'll take the electric, any time... it's got a much wider dynamic range; you can get it hotter, and you can lower the heat to the 'ultra-low' setting, which is VERY hard to do, with at least some gas ranges.

My only complaint: it's very hard to clean. A couple of times a week, I have to break out the special cleaner and work at it.

Joe (SoCal)
02-05-2016, 10:32 AM
But but but but Norman how do you deglaze on electric ? ;)

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xat1/v/t1.0-9/12143284_10206321370966610_4448576942111306780_n.j pg?oh=4cfc7a37a05cf80e5f232877af0153a3&oe=573B612E

For me cooking is more art than science I have no need for dynamic range and ultra low heat. If I want ultra low I move the sauté pan off the gas or lift it off the the flame and "sauté" the ingredients. It's all about controlling your pan not the heat ( it's all in the wrists ;) ) For me I let the sauce tell me what it needs not the register on the dial. Also you just get into a gas flow you "Know" the hot spots there to cool it move the pan, tilt the pan, adjust the heat, add some cooler stock or tomatoes, adjust . It's like playing a violin you make music ;)

Norman Bernstein
02-05-2016, 10:33 AM
For me cooking is more art than science I have no need for dynamic range and ultra low heat. If I want ultra low I move the sauté pan off the gas or lift it off the the flame and "sauté" the ingredients. It's all about controlling your pan not the heat ( it's all in the wrists ;) ) For me I let the sauce tell me what it needs not the register on the dial. Also you just get into a gas flow you "Know" the hot spots there to cool it move the pan, tilt the pan, adjust the heat, add some cooler stock or tomatoes, adjust . It's like playing a violin you make music ;)

That's all because you're an artist, Joe... I'm merely an engineer :)

Joe (SoCal)
02-05-2016, 10:46 AM
That's all because you're an artist, Joe... I'm merely an engineer :)

My buddy up in Amesbury has a top of the line Gaggenau electric cooktop . You seriously need to go to MIT to figure this thing out. It has ONE dial but its a magnet ( kinda cool ) and you move the magnet like a shifter to direction of the burner you want and then slide it back to center and turn the magnet to micro adjust. I was slapping that thing all around like I was playing X-Box. Also there is a hidden exhaust fan that you have to find the button for that ( at my house the exhaust fan is opening the door ;) ) But his exhaust fan goes from the flush back wooooooosh up like a wall and wirrrrrr.

I still managed to make a nice meal for a dinner party we had :)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/Cooking_zpsql55isio.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/Cooking_zpsql55isio.jpg.html)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/cooking%202_zpszyrsyzag.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/cooking%202_zpszyrsyzag.jpg.html)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/cooking%204_zps7phcjryo.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/cooking%204_zps7phcjryo.jpg.html)

Norman Bernstein
02-05-2016, 10:54 AM
Ahhh, Chicken Picatta! One of my favorites, and one of my cooking specialties :)

I see, though, that you're as unconventional as me, in terms of your interpretation of the recipe. I've eaten Veal Picatta in Rome, so I guess I've had the 'real thing'.... but mine and yours are different. You obviously have the lemon and capers... but the addition of some tomato is unconventional.

Mine deviates, as well. The 'traditional' recipe calls for the chicken or veal to be pounded.... instead, I use a very sharp chef's knife and 'triple butterfly' the chicken breasts, which leave them thin enough to cook quickly, and avoids having to pound them. Since I can't use flour to dredge the cutlets (gluten-free, remember) I use a gluten free flour substitute (from Bob's Red Mill), without any egg... it results in barely any coating, but the pieces brown nicely. Finally, my sauce starts with diced Vidalia onions, chicken stock, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and capers.

SWMBO considers it my best item.

Paul Pless
02-05-2016, 10:57 AM
i do a pan fried perch or walleye picatta inspired dish - the bomb!

Norman Bernstein
02-05-2016, 11:08 AM
i do a pan fried perch or walleye picatta inspired dish - the bomb!

Pretty much anything with lemon and capers is gonna taste good :)

Joe (SoCal)
02-05-2016, 11:20 AM
Pretty much anything with lemon and capers is gonna taste good :)

Add Butter, Garlic and tomatoes and a little white wine and it tastes better ;)

The Bigfella
02-07-2016, 12:41 PM
Midnight snack (didn't have lunch), restaurant out front. Stopped to chat to the security guards, lighting up their fire.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-r94tf2T/0/X2/12675236_834889203303213_709476877_o-X2.jpg

Mine was the minced pork omelette and half the deep-fried beef. Went halves in the beer.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-KXZMGbZ/0/X2/12325646_834889149969885_1733082213_o-X2.jpg

Asked them what time they close? 3am

Paul Pless
02-07-2016, 03:05 PM
My buddy up in Amesbury has a top of the line Gaggenau electric cooktop . You seriously need to go to MIT to figure this thing out. It has ONE dial but its a magnet ( kinda cool ) and you move the magnet like a shifter to direction of the burner you want and then slide it back to center and turn the magnet to micro adjust. I was slapping that thing all around like I was playing X-Box. Also there is a hidden exhaust fan that you have to find the button for that ( at my house the exhaust fan is opening the door ;) ) But his exhaust fan goes from the flush back wooooooosh up like a wall and wirrrrrr. sometimes simpler really is better. . .

here's my dream stove, only replace the griddle with a grill. . .

http://image.shop.ferguson.com/prodimages/viking/imageHuge/VVGR7486GCB.jpg

i do admit that i like the new tuscany line, but they cost more than my first three cars combined!

http://static1.squarespace.com/static/541c62c2e4b0a6db313402ba/54d90f45e4b021a44b246a77/54d9106be4b0def8cdf240f9/1423511664891/48+Viking+Tuscany+Range.jpg

Ras Baba
02-07-2016, 05:05 PM
Gumbo! Made a stock with some shrimp shells and a snapper head. Then a coffee black roux with the vegetable troika of chopped onions, celery and bell pepper. Seasoned with red pepper, white pepper, black pepper and thyme. Stir the roux into the stock, add some chopped plum tomatos, okra, simmer low. Add some red snapper chunks, key west pink shrimp, pint of oysters, and some lump crab meat. Served aside some fluffy white rice, a simple red leaf lettuce salad. Bread pudding with a hard lemon sauce to follow. We live very simply here in the country!

Paul Pless
02-10-2016, 12:52 PM
shrimp and corn chowder tonight

a variation, built upon and inspired by the chowder described below


It was a bowl of simmering chowder by the sea side that provided in its basic form "sustenance of body and mind – a marker of hearth and home, community, family and culture". It is a food which evolved along the coastal shoreline of New England as a "congerie" of simple things, very basic and cooked simply. It is a simple dish of salt and pepper, potatoes and onion, pork and fish, cream and hard crackers, and not a sophisticated dish of the elite. Its simplicity made it attractive and it became a regional dish of the New Englanders, and their favorite recipe was "chowder master"."Symbolically, functionally, mnemonically or dynamically" chowder has become a powerful means for New Englanders to define themselves as a community, a rich community with a deep past and value that distinguishes their region from all others. The dish has been made there for a long time and is imbibed into the community culture.As Etta M. Madden and Martha L. Finch observe that chowder provides "visceral memories that provided feelings of familiarity, comfort and continuity"

Joe (SoCal)
02-10-2016, 02:04 PM
sometimes simpler really is better. . .

here's my dream stove, only replace the griddle with a grill. . .

http://image.shop.ferguson.com/prodimages/viking/imageHuge/VVGR7486GCB.jpg

i do admit that i like the new tuscany line, but they cost more than my first three cars combined!

http://static1.squarespace.com/static/541c62c2e4b0a6db313402ba/54d90f45e4b021a44b246a77/54d9106be4b0def8cdf240f9/1423511664891/48+Viking+Tuscany+Range.jpg

DAMN THAT IS DROOL WORTHY

Have you ever used an AGA ? I Have they are supposed to be amazing I didn't find it so

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/db/61/31/db6131345a5ea8199ab30688c325abc9.jpg

Paul Pless
02-10-2016, 02:17 PM
I've never cooked on an AGA, nor ever even seen one in a home. They are cast iron ovens and stoves right?

Joe (SoCal)
02-10-2016, 03:11 PM
I've never cooked on an AGA, nor ever even seen one in a home. They are cast iron ovens and stoves right?

Yea and they are always ON

Captain Intrepid
02-10-2016, 03:29 PM
One of my fondest dreams is to one day own an oven with steam injection. Ain't nothing better for baking bread with a beautiful crackling crust.

http://p-fst1.pixstatic.com/506a1592fb04d60a61000c3b._w.1500_s.fit_.jpg

The Bigfella
02-11-2016, 11:18 AM
Dinner in Hongsa, at the Jumbo Guesthouse. Cooked by Tui and Monica, can't recall what it's called... nice. Good company too, a couple of folks from the German Red Cross. Interesting discussion... even about Zika. They were good company, so I shared my Bordeaux. There were some nice Baron de Rothschild's in the bottle shop, but I felt they were a bit over the budget limit, so... kept it to about $17 a bottle.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-MGP23M4/0/X3/20160209_192300_resized-X3.jpg

The night before that, I was in Chiang Mai and wandered down to the local BBQ. Seafood first

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-x5LWmjv/0/1899x1011/00ba1-1899x1011.jpg

Followed that up with a variety of meats (and vegies and noodles). Bit of a pig out really

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-7Nn4MQx/0/X3/00ba2-X3.jpg

Back to last night, in Luang Prabang. Ate at Joy's. Auke, who I'm travelling with is well known there and I even scored a nice (fully clothed) shoulder massage. This steamed fish with lemongrass was sublime.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-N3bH2SK/0/1899x1068/20160210_192119_resized-1899x1068.jpg

The waiter did cock it up slightly, but we went with it. I got the sticky rice instead of the white... but it went well, so...

Tonight was pork medallions in Phonsavan.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-s3CrrvN/0/X3/20160211_202627_resized-X3.jpg

BETTY-B
02-11-2016, 03:03 PM
One of my fondest dreams is to one day own an oven with steam injection. Ain't nothing better for baking bread with a beautiful crackling crust.

http://p-fst1.pixstatic.com/506a1592fb04d60a61000c3b._w.1500_s.fit_.jpg

I get great crust in the Wolf just by dumping a quarter cup of water in as the bread goes in.


Anyone doing sous vide? There are crappy home models for a couple hundred bucks, but I decided to make one modeled off the couple thousand dollar professional units. Two meals so far. Cod and steak. Both are the best of each I have ever had. Who knew cod could be so nice? And the steak was just incredible. 1/8" sear and totally medium rare and tender for the rest.

The cooker is made up of a cooler, small fish tank motor, 1500w immersion water heater, a simple digital temperature controller and a stainless Starbucks travel cup cut down as a grill to protect the element inside.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Unit2_zpsfpyoszlm.jpg (http://s32.photobucket.com/user/Bridgedeck/media/Food/Sous%20Vide/Unit2_zpsfpyoszlm.jpg.html)

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Unit_zpsth9va5n0.jpg (http://s32.photobucket.com/user/Bridgedeck/media/Food/Sous%20Vide/Unit_zpsth9va5n0.jpg.html)

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/cod_zpsuyjgs9qr.jpg (http://s32.photobucket.com/user/Bridgedeck/media/Food/Sous%20Vide/cod_zpsuyjgs9qr.jpg.html)




http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/TriTip_zpsdrdoanmx.jpeg (http://s32.photobucket.com/user/Bridgedeck/media/Food/Sous%20Vide/TriTip_zpsdrdoanmx.jpeg.html)

Norman Bernstein
02-12-2016, 09:24 AM
Last night: chicken breasts, stuffed with spinach, onions, garlic, ricotta, and parmesan:

http://www.marisystems.com/images/chicken.jpg

Paul Pless
02-12-2016, 09:26 AM
Cooking chili as we speak, beanless for Honeybunny this go round.

Starting by roasting a dozen fresh jalapeño peppers - I like the relatively mild heat and flavor that these peppers give versus the pure heat that hotter peppers provide. I'll add some dried Scotch bonnet bits from our garden for heat later. After these peppers are roasted, I'll dice them fine along with a large sweet onion, a handful of diced celery, and a clove of garlic. I'll saute these in olive oil. Then add 80/20 ground chuck. When that's browned, I'll add a bit of salt, smoked paprika and chili powders and a cup or so of water and allow this to simmer covered for a bit. After that's cooked down and thickened, I'll adjust the heat (spice) then remove it from the stove and let it rest till this afternoon. For dinner I'll serve this with cheese quesadilla, sour cream, avocado, maybe a small simple green salad, and margaritas.

Norman Bernstein
02-12-2016, 09:28 AM
Cooking chili as we speak, beanless for Honeybunny this go round.

Cooking, at 9 in the morning? Sheeesh!

Paul Pless
02-12-2016, 09:40 AM
resting time is an important component in the best chili

Norman Bernstein
02-12-2016, 09:43 AM
Hmmmm... chili isn't a bad idea, for this weekend.... we're expecting record cold by Sunday. Only 9 degrees F this AM, and we'll probably be below 0 on the weekend, with wind chills as low as -20 or worse.

Joe (SoCal)
02-12-2016, 09:54 AM
Betty Sous-vide is all the culinary rage for the last few years. I'm not a fan it's more science than art. It reminds me of those frozen Banquet Boiling Bag chip beef on toast. :(

http://badsequels.com/tastylies/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/chippedbeef1.jpg

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/assets_c/2010/02/dt-chippedbeefgravy-thumb-625xauto-72724.jpg

I mean I get it and I have had some very fine Sous-vide steak, ( The one great thing is for a foodie like me you order med rare, its mid rare all the way through ) but no caramelization no pan juice, no reduction, no FLAME !!! It might be perfect for some fish When you fry a piece of fish, the flesh is most succulent and tender within a very narrow temperature range. Because the cooking temperature of the pan is at least 400 °F hotter than the ideal core temperature of the fish, the edges will inevitably be far more cooked than the center when pan-fried. Sous-vide is absolutely wonderful for vegetables. But I'm old school French Escoffier brigade style, and vacuum bags in boiling water isn't cooking to me. I understand the ABSOLUTE PERFECT TEMP control you can achieve with this method but I'm might be more suited to the engineer cook than this old bald grizzled foodie ;)

Norman Bernstein
02-12-2016, 10:44 AM
Betty Sous-vide is all the culinary rage for the last few years.


I'm going to guess you're referring to cooking in vacuum sealed bags in boiling (or, at least, temperature-controlled) water. I've seen this a few times, on cooking shows, but since I don't have the equipment, nor the room for the equipment, I never gave it a second thought.

I'm relatively new, to cooking... only really been doing it for the last 3-4 years. I cannot claim to be a 'good' cook; I'm just trying to develop a inventory of some things which I can apparently cook well... and it's a limited inventory; the stuff I have done repeatedly, and can do well, follows:

Risotto... gorgonzola and mushroom is my favorite, although if I don't happen to have the requisite ingredients, my 'ordinary' risotto (with parmesan and peas) is pretty good

Soups: I do a vegetable soup which gets rave reviews... a loaded potato soup... and occasionally, a tomato soup. I don't do soups with thin broths, preferring to make thick soups... my immersion blender is the key tool.

Chicken picatta, and chicken marsala... probably not done in the traditional manner, but the family thinks they're pretty good.

Bolognaise: probably my best item, gets rave reviews

Generic Chinese stir fry.. the flavor comes out tasting 'genuine' (i.e., like restaurant Chinese), but I have only one sauce recipe, using rice wine vinegar, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, and chili paste with garlic

Braised short ribs: I'm not completely satisfied with this one... they're good, but not nearly as good as some I've had in restaurants. I was actually taught this one by a professional chef (courtesy of an anniversary gift of a cooking lesson, by my younger daughter), but I can't seem to fully replicate it.

I'm trying to expand my repetiore.... the stuffed chicken breasts pictured above was a first timer experiment. The stuffing was delicious, but the chicken was not evenly cooked... the one my wife ate was overdone, and mine (a larger breast) was underdone, even though most recipes call for 400 degrees for 30-40 minutes. Going to have to work on this one. I'm on the lookout for more recipes, so suggestions are welcome

BETTY-B
02-12-2016, 04:40 PM
Betty Sous-vide is all the culinary rage for the last few years. I'm not a fan it's more science than art. It reminds me of those frozen Banquet Boiling Bag chip beef on toast. :(

http://badsequels.com/tastylies/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/chippedbeef1.jpg

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/assets_c/2010/02/dt-chippedbeefgravy-thumb-625xauto-72724.jpg

I mean I get it and I have had some very fine Sous-vide steak, ( The one great thing is for a foodie like me you order med rare, its mid rare all the way through ) but no caramelization no pan juice, no reduction, no FLAME !!! It might be perfect for some fish When you fry a piece of fish, the flesh is most succulent and tender within a very narrow temperature range. Because the cooking temperature of the pan is at least 400 °F hotter than the ideal core temperature of the fish, the edges will inevitably be far more cooked than the center when pan-fried. Sous-vide is absolutely wonderful for vegetables. But I'm old school French Escoffier brigade style, and vacuum bags in boiling water isn't cooking to me. I understand the ABSOLUTE PERFECT TEMP control you can achieve with this method but I'm might be more suited to the engineer cook than this old bald grizzled foodie ;)

Are you suggesting these fine steaks you have had were not seared off on the grill or in a pan? Yuck. Same with fish. I only seared one side, but the texture of the cod is the best, by far I have ever had. It's just another tool. Of many. I certainly didn't use it when I did veal Oscar the other night. Nor is it used when I use science to put together a traditional Bearnaise.:rolleyes: I do those things the way Escoffier would have done it!

That corned beef you have served up there looks nasty. After brining, I usually do it three ways(the guest list seems to be growing every year). I steam one, boil one and slow cook another in the oven. Only been doing the oven for the last couple years. Surprisingly, it's taking top honors already.

The only way:

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Corned%20Beef/DSCF0814_zps0965fb98.jpg (http://s32.photobucket.com/user/Bridgedeck/media/Food/Corned%20Beef/DSCF0814_zps0965fb98.jpg.html)

I am going to try fried chicken here soon. From what I have read, it too is pretty spectacular.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/07/the-food-lab-southern-fried-chicken-recipe.html

Captain Intrepid
02-12-2016, 04:52 PM
That fried chicken is phenomenal, made it last summer. I really ought to do it again.

BETTY-B
02-12-2016, 05:02 PM
That fried chicken is phenomenal, made it last summer. I really ought to do it again.

I think I will try it using the sous vide method! :d

Paul Pless
02-12-2016, 05:08 PM
okay, the sous vide fried chicken does sound interesting. . .

Joe (SoCal)
02-12-2016, 05:27 PM
Are you suggesting these fine steaks you have had were not seared off on the grill or in a pan? Yuck. Same with fish. I only seared one side, but the texture of the cod is the best, by far I have ever had. It's just another tool. Of many. I certainly didn't use it when I did veal Oscar the other night. Nor is it used when I use science to put together a traditional Bearnaise.:rolleyes: I do those things the way Escoffier would have done it!

That corned beef you have served up there looks nasty. After brining, I usually do it three ways(the guest list seems to be growing every year). I steam one, boil one and slow cook another in the oven. Only been doing the oven for the last couple years. Surprisingly, it's taking top honors already.


I am going to try fried chicken here soon. From what I have read, it too is pretty spectacular.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/07/the-food-lab-southern-fried-chicken-recipe.html


Na most Sous-vide beef is usually seared after it comes out of the "bath". If you just unzip the bag and plop the Souse-Vide beef on a plate it looks like some gray meat. One thing that will make most people turned off is the look of a nice tenderloin after it's pulled from the bag and before its charred. Like I said it's been the "IN" thing for a few years now.

I'm not sure what corn beef you are talking about ? I did one a year or two ago with Guinness in the crockpot, I remember it tasted great. But yours looks nice as well.

But the whole Irish corned beef thing is taking a pretty poor tough cut of meat and making it palatable. The Irish and Jews used brisket because was cheap and they could make it tender with time and effort and seasoning.

Chip-skiff
02-12-2016, 06:03 PM
The Irish and Jews used brisket because was cheap and they could make it tender with time and effort and seasoning.

It's not cheap these days.

Cooking catfish tonight. Report at 10.

Captain Intrepid
02-12-2016, 08:36 PM
I get great crust in the Wolf just by dumping a quarter cup of water in as the bread goes in.


Anyone doing sous vide?

Dumping in water works, but having been a baker, I miss the real thing. :D

I've done a little pseudo sous vide with ziplocks, a programmable kettle, and a pot, even that has drastically improved my steaks. In fact, I think I'm going to do that for supper tonight!

BETTY-B
02-12-2016, 09:37 PM
Dumping in water works, but having been a baker, I miss the real thing. :D

Ha! Well, the real thing is certainly an option...if cash is no barrier! |:)


I've done a little pseudo sous vide with ziplocks, a programmable kettle, and a pot, even that has drastically improved my steaks. In fact, I think I'm going to do that for supper tonight!

Nice!

BETTY-B
02-16-2016, 11:16 PM
The fried chicken was off the hook! Sous Vide took all the pain away!

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken_zpsmqlpq0he.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken3_zpsba1hy3cd.jpg

Did some deep fried mushrooms with it. And mashed potatoes and gravy.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken2_zpsb9vfz8ej.jpg

David G
02-16-2016, 11:21 PM
Youngest made spaghetti. Sauce was home-made - heavy on the lemon & garlic - with shredded chicken. Even did a nice job with the cheesy garlic bread. I'm schtuffed.

Paul Pless
02-17-2016, 07:14 AM
i wonder what my mother's long time maid would say. . .


The fried chicken was off the hook! Sous Vide took all the pain away!

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken_zpsmqlpq0he.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken3_zpsba1hy3cd.jpg

Did some deep fried mushrooms with it. And mashed potatoes and gravy.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken2_zpsb9vfz8ej.jpg

Joe (SoCal)
02-17-2016, 11:01 AM
OK I know this is absolute BLASPHEMY but I've never been a fan of fried chicken {gasp :eek: }
I'm just not a big fan of fried food in any form.

That's said I've heard that crushed Capt'n Crunch make a great breading also corn flakes.
Anyone know about that ?

The Port wine reduction beef stew I made turned out to one of my best stews of the year, Had it for dinner last night.

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpl1/v/t1.0-9/11665455_10206983425077549_873690643604710237_n.jp g?oh=f75ba65d6ce76022bee91a8c40efc4a6&oe=57285E27

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/v/t1.0-9/12743492_10206983425197552_6908142853618169598_n.j pg?oh=9c8933775323d8c4eb41bed9c67715be&oe=5763DE32

Paul Pless
02-17-2016, 11:05 AM
corn flakes works well for fried fish - catfish, striper, crappie especially
never heard of using capt crunch, seems like the sugar would mess things up


OK I know this is absolute BLASPHEMY but I've never been a fan of fried chicken that's unamerican

Paul Pless
02-17-2016, 11:19 AM
Wonder how Chip's catfish turned out? Its a favourite fish of mine to cook, serve, and eat. . .

S.V. Airlie
02-17-2016, 12:24 PM
Not eating much tonight, have to go to a meeting. Leave here 1800 hours and prbably won't be home until 2200 hr. I'll be lucky with a large cuppa (CUP) of coffee and two probably terrible donuts from the local. The coffee is never good and the donuts never are but, no choice! I'll print out the pics here donated by others and stare at them at the meeting.:)

Captain Intrepid
02-17-2016, 12:41 PM
Nothing fancy last night, lightly poached a couple cod loins in salsa. Simple and delicious.

BETTY-B
02-17-2016, 05:15 PM
i wonder what my mother's long time maid would say. . .

She'd probably say "Mmmm, tasty!":D


corn flakes works well for fried fish - catfish, striper, crappie especially
never heard of using capt crunch, seems like the sugar would mess things up

I did cornflakes for years, but changed it up a couple decades ago when I came across panko. For fish and shrimp, in particular.


that's unamerican

No doubt!

Paul Pless
02-17-2016, 05:33 PM
homemade pizza tonight, mine will be thin crust topped sparsely with hot pork sausage, anchovies, basil, a few bits of onion, and mushrooms, fresh mozzarella, a sweet tomato sauce. . .

kat likes hers pretty much exactly the opposite of mine, thick crust, lots of cheese, piles of toppings. . .

Joe (SoCal)
02-17-2016, 06:25 PM
kat likes hers pretty much exactly the opposite of mine, thick crust, lots of cheese, piles of toppings. . .

AKA Cake :(.

That's Un-New York ;)

Joe (SoCal)
02-17-2016, 06:36 PM
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/8575663d681fa06ad6d806be454b7d04_zpsfe1565ec.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/8575663d681fa06ad6d806be454b7d04_zpsfe1565ec.jpg.h tml)

http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m320/fosterhere/c408db33.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/user/fosterhere/media/c408db33.jpg.html)

Paul Pless
02-17-2016, 06:38 PM
AKA Cake :(.

That's Un-New York ;)detroit greektown style

Joe (SoCal)
02-17-2016, 07:55 PM
detroit greektown style

Not Pizza

Katherine
02-17-2016, 08:29 PM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit-style_pizza

pkrone
02-17-2016, 08:35 PM
I consider myself (being a Southerner and all) quite the discerning fried chicken eater. And that, I must say, looks damn good!


The fried chicken was off the hook! Sous Vide took all the pain away!

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken_zpsmqlpq0he.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken3_zpsba1hy3cd.jpg

Did some deep fried mushrooms with it. And mashed potatoes and gravy.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Food/Sous%20Vide/Fried%20Chicken/SousVideChicken2_zpsb9vfz8ej.jpg

Joe (SoCal)
02-17-2016, 09:59 PM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit-style_pizza

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California-style_pizza

Just cause its has a wikipedia page doesnt make it pizza ;)

Joe (SoCal)
02-17-2016, 10:01 PM
https://youtu.be/BrqSizC-T-4

BETTY-B
02-17-2016, 11:06 PM
I consider myself (being a Southerner and all) quite the discerning fried chicken eater. And that, I must say, looks damn good!

Thank you! It really was amazing. I'll slice it open and get a shot of the interior tomorrow when I do another batch. I seasoned every step, brine included and it was just so juicy, crisp and delicious! Being a PNW guy, not known for fried chicken, I have to say that I have had some seriously mean fried chicken in Austin, San Antonio and by a little old granny in Lake Jackson, TX. I have no doubt she would approve of this PNW version of a Southern Classic!

Tonight was fresh chicken pot pies. Made enough extra for the freezer to finish off winter as well.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/Pot%20Pies/Chicken%20Pot%20Pie_zpsbt8bebuw.jpg

Captain Intrepid
02-18-2016, 01:51 AM
https://youtu.be/BrqSizC-T-4

You New Yorkians are so cute. :D From the way you all drearily go on and on and on you'd almost think that Pizza was a New York invention, not Italian!

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 08:19 AM
You New Yorkians are so cute. :D From the way you all drearily go on and on and on you'd almost think that Pizza was a New York invention, not Italian!

Somebody wanna tell me the Italian origins of the Chicago Deep Dish Pizza ? All the Italians I know look at that with the same abomination that Jon Stewart does.

OH and those Italian gottta offah da boat past the Lady In Da Harbor and landida in a New York not Canada ;)


Ellis Island saw more than 12 million immigrants pass through its gates, at a rate of up to 5,000 people a day. For many generations of Americans, and for almost all Italian Americans, Ellis Island is the first chapter of their family’s story in the United States.

Norman Bernstein
02-18-2016, 08:45 AM
I pretty much agree with JoeCSOH on this.....

HOWEVER, when I went to Venice on vacation about 12 years ago, the first meal I had in the city was pizza..... and it was just dreadful :)

I don't know if NY pizza is authentic or not... but it's a damn sight better than anything in either Chicago or Venice :):)

Paul Pless
02-18-2016, 08:56 AM
the best new york pizza i've ever had was in stuttgart, germany. . .

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 09:27 AM
the best new york pizza i've ever had was in stuttgart, germany. . .

Paul you come to New York I'll take ya to Lombardi's we will clean that Stuttgart memory from your mind. That offer extends to {almost} everyone on the forum.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/82/Lombardi's_Pizza.jpg

http://droolius.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Lombardis_Pizza_NYC_1.jpg

Paul I think you might like the Clam Pie sooooo good

http://slice.seriouseats.com/assets_c/2011/02/20110225-lombardis-clam-whole-thumb-500x332-142881.jpg

Norman Bernstein
02-18-2016, 09:31 AM
Paul you come to New York I'll take ya to Lombardi's we will clean that Stuttgart memory from your mind. That offer extends to {almost} everyone on the forum.


Ehhh, I like good pizza... but it CAN be a bit overdone. 'Best on the planet' is the kind of hyperbole which would make me avoid the place, to begin with. I bet there are 50 hole-in-the-wall pizzerias in NYC whose pizza is every bit as good....

....and frankly, this obsession with 'the best' of everything really turns me off.

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 09:42 AM
Ehhh, I like good pizza... but it CAN be a bit overdone. 'Best on the planet' is the kind of hyperbole which would make me avoid the place, to begin with. I bet there are 50 hole-in-the-wall pizzerias in NYC whose pizza is every bit as good....

....and frankly, this obsession with 'the best' of everything really turns me off.

Norman you come to New York - I'll take you, We sit and pray to the pizza Gods at Lombardi's and you just look at me and go OH YEA NOW I GET IT.
I love Pizza I eat it EVERYWHERE !!! I could write a encyclopedia series on all the pizza I've had
I've been to them all there is even a "Two and a coke for $2" that I go to pretty often that's not so bad.

But there is the "HOLY TRINITY" That you don't mess with. These are DESTINATION Pizza Churches. This is Pizza as a religious experience. As a matter of fact Lombardies is close the Roman Catholic Church Old St. Patrick's Cathedral on Mulberry St. the one used in "The Godfather"

John's, in The Bronx ( the Times Square aint bad ) http://www.johnspizzerianyc.com/Locations

Patsy's in brooklyn http://www.patsyspizza.nyc/

And IMHO the BEST ON THE PLANET Lombardi's http://www.firstpizza.com/

Paul Pless
02-18-2016, 09:51 AM
"Two and a coke for $2" that I go to pretty often that's not so bad. . .Ha! When I was in college I used to go to a place two or three times a week that only sold pizza by the slice and draft Budweiser in plastic solo cups - 'A Slice and a Bud' for $2. . .

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 09:57 AM
Ya know what I just called a buddy of mine in from California and we are going to Lombardi's TOMORROW just because of this thread :D {almost} anyone wants to join us they are welcomed.

Paul Pless
02-18-2016, 10:01 AM
yeah, i can eat pizza daily too, probably make it for a lunch today

Norman Bernstein
02-18-2016, 10:05 AM
Hey, I understand the zeitgeist of a foodie.... but lets' not go overboard here. I like pizza, too.... but getting all OCD about it seems a bit over the top :)

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 10:07 AM
Hey, I understand the zeitgeist of a foodie.... but lets' not go overboard here. I like pizza, too.... but getting all OCD about it seems a bit over the top :)

Blasphemy - I may have to pull a Don[n] and lock this thread now :D

Paul Pless
02-18-2016, 10:08 AM
rofl

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 10:11 AM
OK back on subject .... It's late I'm working from home and I haven't made Breakfast yet, a Toad-in-the Hole and a third Nespresso sounds about right ;) off to the kitchen :D

Norman Bernstein
02-18-2016, 10:12 AM
Blasphemy - I may have to pull a Don[n] and lock this thread now :D

You're not being fair, Joe.... you're a super-foodie, tempting all the rest of us... but then again, you're also in superb shape, as contrasted with both Pless and myself, who probably SHOULDN'T be foodies of ANY kind, considering the excess baggage we're both carrying around!

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 10:30 AM
The Toad-in-The-Hole

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xlf1/v/t1.0-9/12745863_10207002046343069_3300192766680182065_n.j pg?oh=a319c3a4e1e1205c2835d75d96c519d5&oe=576AC601

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xlf1/v/t1.0-9/12734208_10207002046463072_973131890909106334_n.jp g?oh=92a72a5097daac04277b024c83b2dd9d&oe=576183F1

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xlp1/v/t1.0-9/12734012_10207002046743079_5893762662985055559_n.j pg?oh=f6a9aa5163b505339d8aa9480a01a80e&oe=575BF60B

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xap1/v/t1.0-9/12688335_10207002046823081_8297636069899881403_n.j pg?oh=124934476ef1da939b97e4b02a207cd5&oe=575F4A9F

Captain Intrepid
02-18-2016, 11:04 AM
Somebody wanna tell me the Italian origins of the Chicago Deep Dish Pizza ?

All needling aside, it's likely descended from Sicilian pizza, and I can't stand it either. ;) But there's room in this world for all kinds of pizza! Variety is the spice of life, as they say.

Chip-skiff
02-18-2016, 06:22 PM
After getting needled about chile, I decided to make a pot of green. Started out with a slow-roasted pork shoulder, cooked with heaps of onions and garlic, cubed. Used the pan drippings and juice instead of stock. More onions, natch. Chopped some chiles poblanos I roasted last fall and some small red chiles I grew and roasted a couple years back, that were in a deep corner of the freezer. Couldn't recall how hot they were so I tasted a bit of one: chingado! Only used three, since what is savoury to me is incendiary to the Wolf Goddess. It still seemed a bit thin, so I chopped some mild Hatch chiles and added them, to even things out. A couple bay leaves, oregano, comino.

Simmer, simmer. . .

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-C_BXKjUOxas/VsZOgigfB3I/AAAAAAAAJyc/9auRic_mwB8/s850-Ic42/P2180023.jpg

Closer to serving, I'll add the corn chip crumbs I save in ziploc bags (to thicken and also salt it). Might add some black pepper. Also fresh parsley (her Majesty doesn't like cilantro).

The sides will be refritos and corn quesadillas with chopped lettuce and tomatoes from the greenhouse.

Good dinner for a miserable wind-whipped grey day.

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 06:43 PM
Chip-Skiff that looks wonderful just the right amount of sheen. Re: Cilantro there are people who can't stand it and people who love it like me no one in between :)

Paul Pless
02-18-2016, 06:48 PM
and then there are people who don't know cilantro from coriander. . .

pan fried catfish fillets tonight, potatoes, slaw, pickled okra and jalapeño peppers, beer

Joe (SoCal)
02-18-2016, 06:54 PM
Tonight a caprese salad, Just fresh Mimo's Mozzarella some basil, tomatoes, EVOO, kosher salt

BETTY-B
02-19-2016, 12:42 AM
Did pizza tonight.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/pizza/pizza4%202-16_zpsrtttemxd.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/pizza/pizza%202-16_zpsrj40kmaa.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d10/Bridgedeck/pizza/pizza2%202-16_zpsaiit1f8q.jpg

Joe (SoCal)
02-19-2016, 10:42 AM
1:00PM Lunch at Lombardi's photos to come ;)

BETTY-B
02-19-2016, 02:16 PM
1:00PM Lunch at Lombardi's photos to come ;)

Hey! Still there? Can you ask them what temperature their oven is? I've heard it is extremely high and cooks the pizza in just a couple minutes. Would like some actual stats on this. Not that I can get my oven to those temps...just curious. Incidentally, I do mine at 515°F for 6-7 minutes.

Paul Pless
02-19-2016, 02:20 PM
550°F convection roast with a thick pizza stone for five minutes for me.

Norman Bernstein
02-19-2016, 02:22 PM
.Re: Cilantro there are people who can't stand it and people who love it like me no one in between :)

I'm one of those who thinks cilantro tastes like soap. It's an interesting phenomenon. From an NPR article:


I hate cilantro. As far as I'm concerned, it should be wiped off the face of the planet. And I'm not alone in my extremist views."It has that same sort of acrid sweetness of death," according to my friend Jason. "It's got this evilness to it," my friend Wendy concurs.

For people like us, the smell alone is enough to send us running in horror. But why? What fuels the great cilantro divide?

My quest for answers began with the Internet. It was there that I learned (from questionable sources) that our hatred arises from the fact that we are supertasters. Gifted (or burdened) with a "supersensitive palate," we are some of the rare beings who are tuned into the true nature of this nasty green beast.

" 'Supertasters' is actually a term that was originally envisioned to describe people who were particularly sensitive to a very restricted class of bitter compounds," explains Dr. Danielle Reed of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, before delivering the big blow: "None of which, to the best of my knowledge, are found in cilantro."

The Official Supertaste Test

Even though Reed has done a ton of research on supertasters, I'm still willing to believe that I'm one of them. I decide to take the official test, which involves chewing up a small strip of paper soaked in propylthiouracil, a special taster chemical, for about a minute.

True supertasters don't need that long to identify the nauseating taste, however.

"If you were a supertaster, you would be very angry with me right now," Reed explains as I dutifully chew the paper. "You would be experiencing that as intensely bitter."

I taste nothing, which leads Reed to conclude that I am a "non-taster." Not even normal taster — a non-taster.

"A lot of journalists tend to be non-tasters. Wine reporters are especially upset when they find out," she explains.

As it turns out, my girlfriend, Danielle, and my friend Wendy are both supertasters. They can't wait to spit out the paper.

The Unofficial Supersmell Test

After all this, I'm willing to admit that being a supertaster has nothing to do with hating cilantro. So what could it be? The answer comes to me as I chew cilantro while holding my nose. Without smelling it, I find, it's more like harmless old parsley, but when I release my nose, it's like a bottle of soap.

According to Dr. Charles Wysocki, another Monell scientist, the problem extends far beyond me and my group of friends.

Wysocki took some chopped up cilantro to Twinsburg, Ohio, for the annual twins festival, and had identical and fraternal twins sniff cilantro and rate pleasantness. People tended to fall mainly into two groups — the lovers and the haters — and identical twins almost always rated cilantro the same way as their sibling counterpart.

This seems to suggest, "that there's a strong genetic component," he explains. "People like you may be smelling things that other people aren't."

I gather from this that the problem is that I'm a supersmeller of some sort. While cilantro lovers like Wysocki think cilantro smells "fabtastically savory," we haters are smelling something more. I needed a Gas Chromatograph (GC) to confirm my hypothesis.

The GC is a machine that basically separates a sample of stuff into its constituent compounds. It slowly heats up a sample of material over the course of 40 minutes. As the temperature rises, each compound in the mix evaporates at different times. A flow of air passes over the sample and is split into two streams: One goes past a detector; the other one goes past the subject's nose. So if we put cilantro in the GC and I smell something at minute 8 and something else at minute 12, we can pinpoint what the offending odor is.

I put my supersmelling nose to the test and at 20 minutes, I identify the evil smell.

"They're all unsaturated aldahydes," Dr. George Preti explains. There we have it, the compound that ruins every dish and makes me think of soap.
Ten minutes later, Wysocki and Preti identify the unmistakable smell of cilantro that they love. I, however, smell nothing.

This, it turns out, is the real problem. My whole life I've been unable to pick up on the scent that is so overwhelmingly good for cilantro lovers that it trumps any possible bad. I come to a disappointing realization: I am not an X-Man with superkeen sensory abilities. I am a sensory dud who's missing the true nature of cilantro.

BETTY-B
02-19-2016, 02:51 PM
550°F convection roast with a thick pizza stone for five minutes for me.

What kind of stone is "pizza stone"? I currently have a piece of carrera marble cut to fit the Wolf. I give it at lease an additional half hour after it has come to temp. Got any ideas what the benefits might be for me to turn it up to 550°? Something amazing is going on with the traditional pizza ovens baking at extreme temps way beyond that for sure.

Paul Pless
02-19-2016, 02:55 PM
its just a big tile

Joe (SoCal)
02-19-2016, 04:59 PM
Hey! Still there? Can you ask them what temperature their oven is? I've heard it is extremely high and cooks the pizza in just a couple minutes. Would like some actual stats on this. Not that I can get my oven to those temps...just curious. Incidentally, I do mine at 515°F for 6-7 minutes.

just finishing up a gastronomical adventure post when I get home

FYI

Lombardi was naturally influenced by the great pizza pie recipes of Naples, but he found it necessary to adapt the pizza to American technology and ingredients. Instead of a wood-fired brick oven as in Naples, he used a coal-fired brick oven. That was a good idea, since the lower temperatures of regular ovens dry out the pizza dough before the outside of the crust is crisp and the topping has cooked. A coal oven, however, can reach temperatures of 850 degrees Fahrenheit or more, higher than most of today’s conventional gas or electric ovens. That means that the oven can cook the pizza dough really quickly. Authentic Neapolitan pizzas bake in about 80 to 120 seconds, while authentic Neapolitan-American pizzas take about five minutes.

Chip-skiff
02-19-2016, 06:36 PM
Cod cakes tonight. Never made them before, but it ain't pizza science. Y:o

Joe (SoCal)
02-19-2016, 09:11 PM
So I had Lunch this afternoon with a good friend of mine. He a Marine served two tours one in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. He's seen a lot if $hite and has lost a lot of brothers.

We met at Lombardi's ( THE BEST PIZZA ON THE PLANET )

I should also add, he's a right wing, NRA lovin, Harley Riding, Country Music lovin guy, and we get along like two peas in a pod Oh and he's Black and didn't vote for Obama

It was great to see him, and it was so exciting to take this friend who's been living in Pizza deprived SoCal to one of the TRINITY of NY pizza cathedrals LOMBARDI'S.

We ordered the original and I let him pick the toppings, he chose meatballs and pepperoni.

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfl1/v/t1.0-9/12705685_10207010707639596_187232616193858679_n.jp g?oh=fc7a6c866885b4431193a87974d1d011&oe=575826A0

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/12717658_10207010707799600_7396163549663483059_n.j pg?oh=3af4d691fa5152270bb99ff3657196e3&oe=57621AB0

They use a coal oven from 1905 that heats and can reach temperatures of 850 degrees Fahrenheit or more, higher than most of today’s conventional gas or electric ovens. That means that the oven can cook the pizza dough really quickly. Authentic Neapolitan pizzas bake in about 80 to 120 seconds

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/v/t1.0-9/12734059_10207010708119608_1358228011450323002_n.j pg?oh=456884a5bd5d2878467af58d58ecd492&oe=575D48ED

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/12717286_10207010708239611_3696536626113824457_n.j pg?oh=cce6b850e43091b62789ad12dfd07616&oe=576B75A0

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/v/t1.0-9/12734069_10207010708639621_6278385993633667242_n.j pg?oh=6e4611164ac3679d23bd6ba391a03177&oe=5761C80A

Yea its just as Good as it tastes

Then we went to Ferarries for some Italian pastries and coffee

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xlp1/v/t1.0-9/12733434_10207010714959779_1910094243502897268_n.j pg?oh=a6216bdea6a009fc3641292b38e9a43c&oe=5758BA87

Chip-skiff
02-19-2016, 09:49 PM
Looks good, and he looks like a stand-up guy. (Not so sure about you) :cool:.

Anyhow, the first-time cod cakes turned out good.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-h858guE9LGw/VsfS13Wt7vI/AAAAAAAAJzQ/8AJoV8V7_Gk/s850-Ic42/cod%252520cakes.jpg

ccmanuals
02-19-2016, 09:55 PM
I have yet to find a New Yorker who doesn't wear black all winter. :)

Chip-skiff
02-19-2016, 10:03 PM
I have yet to find a New Yorker who doesn't wear black all winter. :)

You don't get out much.

http://blog.indiaspopup.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/lady-gaga-123.png

The Bigfella
02-20-2016, 10:05 AM
Steamed fish, lemon sauce. Bit spicy.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-QvGdp7S/0/X3/00bb8-X3.jpg

L.W. Baxter
02-20-2016, 12:22 PM
In the argument over pizza, all I can say is "yessss".

In other words, the great variety of pizza is what makes it fabulous. I have had slices of the fold-able thin crust in NYC, and agree that it is hard to beat. But, I would hate to be limited to one "type".

This was last night's take out, from our local pizza geniuses, Nonna Emilia's, about a mile from my house. Thick crust, tangy sauce. This one is pepperoni, olive, and mushroom.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-HUMbATCNhCao5xbyrLOAdanyVM0GO_a7looSiYQ5prXK9KZL-RNUzg5JTMTBV74wKJWbY4Su8Ofhi1LksaBatzfDFB086vUMjeF sfkOdK_RDB7E3jNi_B9O86dbOFNUf6ArA8QWitE89Aan4ReLt-EWTOW16hL46WdgWu6p1vyjDv0ecOvsT2m10_hknUpHBcgtPJM2 Nfb0maCX4o5t59DertIJeLJhHtOtlNQddc1mClOagrzHEenEAJ bxI5CW35d7zA3U1pmNe6NMpZXgWJoq3QNgBpzbHTJUNOB4Smk6 CQw5agPn8tbaqb198ndrKBz5j3an30mak356cllLW7sBEJtawV cLLlhvraenDU-iGz8T4wMruTGJ-it--LFyOP2yZa2DfdE7kyRxvbxiRPKA8kfXfoc8rQR8TiLSC-jImUcQc4KaNmt90QRz7yh616tq4fOky5JXZEkOygfxpmjfmxhc tySdIUSKsYeeqoFeQarFlhcSh_xt_B2bVzj5AvNGUAN6GRpqT8 XaaRuOv2nbQjaqqikiOvqhJdw21WuGKDqE4ftla0L6AGfo6m_u zjxIXQ=w1698-h955-no

Lew Barrett
02-20-2016, 01:39 PM
Then we went to Ferarries for some Italian pastries and coffee

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xlp1/v/t1.0-9/12733434_10207010714959779_1910094243502897268_n.j pg?oh=a6216bdea6a009fc3641292b38e9a43c&oe=5758BA87


That's Ferrara's (http://www.ferraranyc.com/) but I know what you meant. By the way, you never see a pizza topped as in your photo in Italy, north or south. But having eaten at Lombardi's when I was a New Yorker, I can vouch for the quality of the product anyway. It's just that Italian pizza is different than what most people experience as Italian (American) pizza, especially as regards toppings. As long as they nail the crust, and Lombardi's does, I'm fine with it. Neapolitan ovens are wood fired, another difference.

Norman Bernstein
02-20-2016, 01:46 PM
That's Ferrara's (http://www.ferraranyc.com/) but I know what you meant. By the way, you never see a pizza topped as in your photo in Italy, north or south. But having eaten at Lombardi's when I was a New Yorker, I can vouch for the quality of the product anyway. It's just that Italian pizza is different than what most people experience as Italian (American) pizza, especially as regards toppings. As long as they nail the crust, and Lombardi's does, I'm fine with it. Neapolitan ovens are wood fired, another difference.

The pizza I ate in Venice was a gloopy mess of gooey cheese and sliced ham. Of course, we might have just picked the wrong restaurant.

Lew Barrett
02-20-2016, 02:14 PM
The pizza I ate in Venice was a gloopy mess of gooey cheese and sliced ham. Of course, we might have just picked the wrong restaurant.

I would say "might have" is an understatement! :D Of all the cities in Italy, Venice is probably the most likely (or at least in the top two) to get a sour meal in. Its only reason anymore is tourism. Having said that, we ate well there, but it's been at least 15 years since I was last in Venice.

Edit to add: I've never seen pizza like that in Italy. I suppose it is possible to get stuck with a lousy one, but you really have to work at it.

Lew Barrett
02-20-2016, 02:23 PM
I suppose I need to kick in on the positive aspects of this thread. I'm making pho tonight. The bones are simmering now and I've collected all the ingredients to go "tradish." When I have time I'll also post photos of a 21 pound fresh king salmon that was overnighted to us last week from Pure Food in Seattle. My wife's buddy sent it to us because Lindy commented that she was missing Seattle's salmon . It was an amazing thing, so delicious. We had salmon sashimi the first night, buttery, completely without any fishy taste. Te next night we had my daughter and her boyfriend over for grilled salmon in lemon butter. Also amazing. Had to be at least a $500 fish.

.

Joe (SoCal)
02-20-2016, 03:11 PM
I got a Pork Loin that I'm trying to figure out what to do. I'm thinking of doing a Pork Loin with Fig and Port Sauce with fresh rosemary and cloves.

Photo and recipe as soon as I figure it out to follow :)

slug
02-20-2016, 03:13 PM
Not much for dinner tonight...Doritos, Guacamole and a bit of salsa

Im conserving firepower and stockpiling cash in preparation for tax time ... Someone has to pay for all those liberal pipe dreams


Cheap..but ill get by.

http://s27.postimg.org/x0f0149zn/image.jpg (http://postimage.org/)
share image (http://postimage.org/index.php?lang=spanish)

Joe (SoCal)
02-20-2016, 03:15 PM
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/130926155851-breaking-bad-cash-1024x576.jpg

Peerie Maa
02-20-2016, 03:40 PM
Ray wing fried in batter, chips, and mushy peas.

http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/0a/0f/a5/81/fresh-skate-wing-homemade.jpg Although I fried better chips than those :D

Joe (SoCal)
02-20-2016, 04:00 PM
Started to PLAY with flavors and develop an idea

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpt1/v/t1.0-9/12742493_10207017129240132_9098326010080152762_n.j pg?oh=bda087ab13044b2798ae8dfa36d3fe1a&oe=57550BB1

Joe (SoCal)
02-20-2016, 05:25 PM
Coming along

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xlp1/v/t1.0-9/12733968_10207017524330009_8378372089144482462_n.j pg?oh=89b2b63a75a1c8076c83933f8c6fa8ed&oe=57262A8A

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xaf1/v/t1.0-9/12745498_10207017524410011_8811126959843668341_n.j pg?oh=49dad774d4eebd320f057d72a8c03e77&oe=575FE8BC

Norman Bernstein
02-20-2016, 05:40 PM
Ray wing fried in batter, chips, and mushy peas.


Why anyone would do that to a nice pea is beyond me.....

I first saw that in Ireland in 1981; at first, I couldn't figure out what it was... it reminded me of library paste, tinted green.

Paul Pless
02-20-2016, 06:36 PM
tonight:

dry aged, bone in, thick cut ribeyes - rubbed with crushed garlic, kosher salt, coarse ground pepper
super hot hardwood fire on the webber - 2.5 minutes per side directly over the coals with the lid on tightly to prevent flare up
allowed to rest before serving

some kind of potato probably

a cabernet from bordeaux





----------------------------------

i need to get on a diet on monday, this thread is killing me. . .

Joe (SoCal)
02-20-2016, 06:40 PM
Came out great to good to type the recipe :)

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/12742849_10207018630597665_9192939367019389875_n.j pg?oh=0bd1bf89f3ab1eeba7ee4a33fabb8ebd&oe=575FA448

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/12717267_10207018630757669_3862076022512852980_n.j pg?oh=efd216cd045d80d70132b3438c9d861c&oe=5767A804

Peerie Maa
02-20-2016, 06:40 PM
Why anyone would do that to a nice pea is beyond me.....

I first saw that in Ireland in 1981; at first, I couldn't figure out what it was... it reminded me of library paste, tinted green.

It is about the only thing that you can do with dried marrowfat peas, apart from pea 'n ham soup.

David G
02-20-2016, 06:54 PM
Don't know for sure yet. But we just bought a new microwave... and I might get inspired to see what I can do with pork chops in a m'wave.

Chip-skiff
02-20-2016, 07:28 PM
Loin lamb chops, 1-1/2" thick, on the grill outdoors. Boiled Yukon Gold potatoes. Steamed asparagus. Middling bottle of cabernet.

Paul Pless
02-20-2016, 07:42 PM
That looks and sounds excellent Joe.

Norman Bernstein
02-20-2016, 07:45 PM
Dinner tonight: a chicken Cobb salad for her, a turkey avocado BLT sandwich for me. From that 5 star restaurant, Panera.

We can't be gourmets every night. :)

(Let's be fair.... last night I made Chicken Marsala and risotto, and SWMBO proclaimed it to be the best Marsala I've ever made)

StevenBauer
02-20-2016, 07:46 PM
Don't know for sure yet. But we just bought a new microwave... and I might get inspired to see what I can do with pork chops in a m'wave.


I sure hope you are kidding, David. I'm pretty sure the only thing you can do with pork chops in a microwave is ruin them.


Steven

hokiefan
02-20-2016, 07:53 PM
Broiled chicken breast, coated with honey mustard with chopped ginger. Came out really good, I would post a pic but I already ate it.

Cheers,

Bobby

Tom Montgomery
02-20-2016, 08:36 PM
Grilled ribeye steak and a baked potato.

Hey! It was 72 degrees fahrenheit today!

Paul Pless
02-20-2016, 08:41 PM
62 here in Hell today Tom, but hellsbells it was windy last night and this morning. . .

Joe (SoCal)
02-20-2016, 09:52 PM
Dinner tonight: a chicken Cobb salad for her, a turkey avocado BLT sandwich for me. From that 5 star restaurant, Panera.

We can't be gourmets every night. :)

(Let's be fair.... last night I made Chicken Marsala and risotto, and SWMBO proclaimed it to be the best Marsala I've ever made)

I'm Ok with Panera, Renee and I have grabbed a soup and sandwich there every so often pretty great for what it is.

What's your Marsala recipe ? I haven't done a Marsala in a looooong time. Good choice going with the risotto as your starch ;)

Joe (SoCal)
02-20-2016, 10:01 PM
That looks and sounds excellent Joe.

OK so recipie is as follows

Pork Loin washed in cold water and pat dry with paper towels
Marinate in Port wine shallots and rosemary
Rib side sliced and filled with figs
Loin side punch in the cloves
Sprinkle with kosher salt and pepper
Sprinkle fresh rosemary
Put it in the rotisserie for 1:40 min or until the inside is !45 deg F ( I use a thermometer )

20 minutes before it's done make your pan juice.
3 pads of butter
1/2 a shallot
Add rotisserie pan juice
1 cup Port
1/4 cup chopped figs
bunch of fresh rosemary
1/4 cup of chicken stock ( I make my own )
salt pepper to taste
Reduce by half.

David G
02-20-2016, 10:02 PM
I sure hope you are kidding, David. I'm pretty sure the only thing you can do with pork chops in a microwave is ruin them.


Steven

My life is one long adventure. <G>

As it happened... I got distracted. But not before I found a m'wave version of scaloppine, using pork loin or pork chops, that sounds quite interesting. Maybe tomorrow.

Lew Barrett
02-20-2016, 10:09 PM
http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff76/LewBarrett/Pho_zpsy0b9rvyh.jpg

Pho. Plenty of scallions, and no shorting the cilantro either.

The Bigfella
02-26-2016, 12:26 AM
A nice article on the fabulous foods of Chiang Mai, my base in SEA

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2016/feb/24/thai-street-food-chiang-mai-tour-thailand?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Facebook

Norman Bernstein
02-26-2016, 10:49 AM
This is the 'before' picture... I forgot to take the 'after' picture. A pork loin, stuffed with spinach, garlic, onions, and Parmesan. I stuff it by 'unrolling' the loin into a flat piece of meat, then add the stuffing as I roll it up. Usually, I tie it, but didn't, this time.

http://www.marisystems.com/images/porkloin.jpg

Paul Pless
02-26-2016, 12:04 PM
Pork the one you love.

Ted Hoppe
02-28-2016, 01:29 AM
http://media1.fdncms.com/eastbayexpress/imager/u/zoom/4669540/2d6d8527_cooling_rack_35_.jpg

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1488/25034786050_fe9511b80c_b.jpg

skuthorp
02-28-2016, 01:33 AM
Fish and chip night. half the street, once a month at someone's place. Wine and beer, a BBQ and a wheelbarrow as a sag wagon.

The Bigfella
02-28-2016, 09:43 AM
This could go in lunch or dinner... as it was both. 5pm... went looking for a screw. Local bike shop didn't have one... so had dinner instead.

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-LCbn7Rt/0/1899x1068/dindins-1899x1068.jpg

That's the 3rd of the local BBQ joints I've tried. About 250 metres from the apartment. Dearest of the three... 189 baht ($5) plus the beer. I think it was dearer because there was just me. Sign out front says 159 baht. All you can eat, of course. I had some noodles, greens and crab sticks going in the pot (same induction hot plate as mine)... and I added some calamari to the BBQ plate later too.

Captain Intrepid
02-28-2016, 12:18 PM
went looking for a screw. Local bike shop didn't have one...

Well, obviously it was the wrong place to go looking for a screw. ;)

Chip-skiff
02-28-2016, 06:04 PM
Yesterday, I fired up the smoker for the first time this year. The air was a bit too cold and it was hard to maintain the temperature, but I did a massive pork butt and a beef brisket with hickory. About four hours in the smoker, then wrapped in foil with sliced onions and finished it in a countertop roaster at 250°F. The whole space was filled with meat, so I wasn't sure it would cook right, but it was fine. Both pieces were moist and nicely pink inside with a good bark and deep smoke flavour.

I was so hungry I neglected to take photos. We had some of each, with buttered peas, sliced Italian bread, celery and carrot sticks, and pickles.

Today, I got the pork roast ready for vacuum packing and freezing—

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-5fZ1DCSKL74/VtN5zKlOcHI/AAAAAAAAJ2g/Q4j_MgG88IY/s850-Ic42/P2280002.jpg

Slices, cubes for chile, and shredded/pulled for sandwiches or tamales. The blue-topped tub is for dog scraps. After our big meat meal yesterday, tonight we're having butternut squash soup and Italian bread, toasted with roast tomato tapenade and parmesan. I'll work on the brisket tomorrow.

CWSmith
02-28-2016, 06:12 PM
Sweet potato, onion, and spicy Italian sausage hash with eggs if I get started soon.

Sorry, no stacks of cash, but I enjoyed the photos.

Breakaway
02-28-2016, 06:19 PM
Baked ziti, with the sauce from scratch. Garlic bread. Chopped salad. Carbonated water.

Kevin

Sent from my iPhone using Forum Runner

Chris Coose
02-28-2016, 06:54 PM
Hadn't peeked at this thread till now. I forgot how much meat dominates most meals.
I'm not vegetarian but I can't recall the last time we cooked meat here at home.
Probably the last sit down was some chicken breasts, cooked down on the pier last summer.

Joe (SoCal)
02-28-2016, 07:03 PM
So Ian tell me a little more about this induction heating thing I always see in your post. How is heated ? Is it always little strips of protein or do they do larger items on that cooking surface ?

The Bigfella
02-28-2016, 07:10 PM
So Ian tell me a little more about this induction heating thing I always see in your post. How is heated ? Is it always little strips of protein or do they do larger items on that cooking surface ?


Sorry... some slight confusion there Joe. The induction hotplate is the one with the round pot of water on it in this photo

https://brontebloke.smugmug.com/Thai16/i-LCbn7Rt/0/1899x1068/dindins-1899x1068.jpg

If you look at the table over in the background... the induction hotplate is the flat device - and the pot is brought out and water added from a large teapot. The round device on the other table is the BBQ... and they bring that square plate out and sit it on top. This from wiki about induction cooking:


Induction cooking heats a cooking vessel (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooking_vessel) by magnetic induction (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_heating), instead of by thermal conduction (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_conduction) from a flame, or an electrical heating element (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heating_element). Because inductive heating directly heats the vessel, very rapid increases in temperature can be achieved.
In an induction cooker, a coil of copper wire is placed under the cooking pot and an alternating electric current (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternating_current) is passed through it. The resulting oscillating magnetic field (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_field) induces a magnetic flux (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_flux) which repeatedly magnetises the pot, treating it like the lossymagnetic core (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_core) of a transformer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transformer). This produces large eddy currents (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddy_current) in the pot, which because of the resistance of the pot, heats it (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resistive_heating).
For nearly all models of induction cooktops, a cooking vessel must be made of, or contain, a ferromagnetic (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferromagnetic) metal such as cast iron (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cast_iron) or some stainless steels (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel). However, copper (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper), glass, non magnetic stainless steels, and aluminum vessels could be used if placed on a separately obtained ferromagnetic interface disk which functions as a conventional hotplate.
Induction cooking is quite efficient, which means it puts less waste heat into the kitchen, can be quickly turned off, and has safety advantages compared to gas hobs (cooktops). Hobs are also usually easy to clean, because the hob itself does not get very hot.


The BBQ plate, on the other hand, is gas fired. What amazes me is that the BBQ plates are always spotless when you start... but not when you finish. Some poor sod gets the job of cleaning 100 plates or more at the end of the night.

At this restaurant, you go to the raw food area and grab a few plates of whatever you want.... and start cooking. Yes, generally small pieces... cooks fast. Good for a small party... always something to watch or do...

The Bigfella
02-29-2016, 09:18 AM
Wow... was dinner nice tonight, or what? No photos... had just intended to go out front... didn't even have the phone with me. I realised the bike hadn't come in under cover... jumped on the bike (no helmet... tch tch) and ended up doing a few kilometers, but stopped for dinner at a street stall / open-walled shed near the uni, a couple of hundred metres from the apartment. The guy spoke great English... I asked him for something non-spicy... scored a rice soup combination. Meat, egg, etc. $1.50. Tipped him 100% it was so good. I'll dine there again. Lots of happy uni students there too.

Minnesnowtan
02-29-2016, 11:11 AM
I just got a whole hog butchered. $267.30 butchered, cut, wrapped, cured, smoked, etc etc for the parts that needed it. So took a cured smoked hock, put it in the slow cooker covered with sauerkraut. Delicious! Have the remainder of the hock now on the stove simmering away for some killer bean soup!

bobbys
02-29-2016, 11:45 AM
Cold beans and hardtack.

Paul Pless
03-04-2016, 06:08 PM
deep fried hot wings in peanut oil no breading
then tossed in a sriracha orange juice reduction
cold cold beer

Figment
03-04-2016, 06:28 PM
I like your style, there.

Leftover pot roast here.

Chip-skiff
03-04-2016, 07:43 PM
Headed to the local saloon and dancehall for a dinner out.

http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/09/5e/0b/34/woods-landing-resort.jpg

David G
03-05-2016, 11:28 AM
Last night was Spaghetti sauce with mushrooms over tiny meatballs and cappellini. Lightly steamed cabbage & celery with tarragon. Whole-grain garlic Bread. Pale ale.

Tonight, I'm thinking I'll pick up a pizza.

Norman Bernstein
03-05-2016, 11:35 AM
Last night: chicken picatta, and some risotto... something I make frequently.

I gotta find simpler things to cook for dinner, though... too much of what I can do well takes too long and is too elaborate. I was thinking of trying a brisket in a dutch over this weekend... not particularly complicated to put together, and according to some cooking videos, as long as I can give it four or five hours at a low temp, it can come out tender. Never tried it before, though. I'm pretty surprised at how expensive briskets are... saw a 3.5 lb one in the supermarket for around $31.

Chip-skiff
03-06-2016, 01:36 PM
Poked around in the freezer: some scallops, shrimp. Homemade chicken stock. Olive oil, onions, garlic, saffron, yellow bell pepper, undersized tomatoes dried on the vine. Rotini. Dashes of soy sauce and nam pla. Parsley. No recipe– just thrown together. Toasted sesame bagels, carrot and celery sticks on the side. Herself thought it was great.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Qy0ou2PUEwE/Vtx2SiDUzHI/AAAAAAAAJ3M/G78jqd_y55w/s850-Ic42/P3050001.jpg

Paul Pless
03-06-2016, 01:42 PM
Kat is roasting a duck tonight. Its one of my favourite meals that she cooks.

Norman Bernstein
03-06-2016, 01:47 PM
I've got a brisket in the oven now.... first time trying it. Braising in red wine and stock, with onions, carrots, celery, rosemary, thyme, bay leaves, and a little bit of tomato paste. More or less following a video recipe from Tyler Florence. We'll see how it comes out, at dinnertime.

LeeG
03-06-2016, 01:49 PM
Grilled ribeye, aspergagus

Peerie Maa
03-06-2016, 01:54 PM
Grilled ribeye, aspergagus

The same, well nearly. It's griddled and with fried onions, chestnut mushrooms and French fries.

LeeG
03-06-2016, 02:25 PM
The same, well nearly. It's griddled and with fried onions, chestnut mushrooms and French fries.

Excellent, I have a view of the shop parking lot and a few masts over the bldgs, and a brisk gray overcast day, you?

David G
03-06-2016, 02:27 PM
I'm stilling thinking about pizza. <G>

Paul Pless
03-06-2016, 02:28 PM
I'm stilling thinking about pizza. <G>i had pizza three days this week and could still eat it again :D

Peerie Maa
03-06-2016, 02:41 PM
Excellent, I have a view of the shop parking lot and a few masts over the bldgs, and a brisk gray overcast day, you?

It's been dry and bright, not before time. :D

David G
03-06-2016, 03:03 PM
i had pizza three days this week and could still eat it again :D

Fur Get It!! I ain't sharin'. No way, no how. Kat has already warned us what happens when you get loose near a pizza!!!

marshcat
03-06-2016, 04:45 PM
This will be part of dinner. Plowed out my 85 year old widowed neighbor's drive after the last big snow. She just dropped this off, and it was still hot:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-1TJ17OjG9QI/VtykEK7DBHI/AAAAAAAACUM/LIx48F-Aa-c/s512-Ic42/IMG_20160306_150245926.jpg

The picture above looks a bit like cherry because of the sugar/cinnamon in the crust, but it is apple. Because it was hot, we decided not to wait for dinner. Added the only thing that could possibly make it better - the whole is greater than the sum of the parts:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-dwS_sqGKAU4/VtykCv4CTBI/AAAAAAAACUM/budM_dMr5hw/s912-Ic42/IMG_20160306_152417928.jpg

Important to get the ice cream to pie ratio right.

Breakaway
03-06-2016, 04:46 PM
Nice, marshcat! (And well done on the plowing!)

Kevin

S/V Laura Ellen
03-06-2016, 05:03 PM
Herb infused hickory smoked back ribs are in the smoker, will be served with coleslaw infused with mint. Maybe some perogies and sour cream.

The new (to me) PID seems to be working well, holding the temp rock steady at 225 F.

Paul Pless
03-06-2016, 05:10 PM
Added the only thing that could possibly make it better.cheese?

S/V Laura Ellen
03-06-2016, 05:10 PM
This will be part of dinner. Plowed out my 85 year old widowed neighbor's drive after the last big snow. She just dropped this off, and it was still hot

Sounds like a win/win arrangement.

S/V Laura Ellen
03-06-2016, 05:15 PM
Added the only thing that could possibly make it better -


cheese?

Yes, old or extra-old cheddar.

marshcat
03-06-2016, 05:35 PM
Yes, old or extra-old cheddar.

Sounds northern (but interesting). If I told my neighbor I put cheddar cheese on her fresh baked pie it would be the last pie I ever got from her.

Paul Pless
03-06-2016, 05:56 PM
Sounds northern (but interesting). If I told my neighbor I put cheddar cheese on her fresh baked pie it would be the last pie I ever got from her.rofl

Canoeyawl
03-06-2016, 10:09 PM
Maple syrup is pretty good on Apple pie - just sayin'...

David G
03-06-2016, 11:43 PM
I ended up too lazy to go fetch pizza... so I had a quickie. A brace of eggs, over easy. Rye toast. Milk. G.S. cookies. I'm pleased.

Nicholas Carey
03-06-2016, 11:55 PM
Last night, I made Beef Stroganov. High hit with SWMBO.

Tonight is leftovers night. Shepherds' Pie made with last week's leftover pot-roasted pork shoulder.

Norman Bernstein
03-07-2016, 01:16 PM
I've got a brisket in the oven now.... first time trying it. Braising in red wine and stock, with onions, carrots, celery, rosemary, thyme, bay leaves, and a little bit of tomato paste. More or less following a video recipe from Tyler Florence. We'll see how it comes out, at dinnertime.

Well, I forgot to take photos, but the result was successful, if not exactly what was planned.

The brisket was very tender, near falling apart, which was good... and the flavor was fabulous. There was not, as I was expecting, a lot of liquid left over, even though the brisket was well submerged with red wine and stock... apparently, the liquid was almost completely absorbed. The seasoning was rosemary, thyme, garlic, bay leaves, some tomato paste, etc... and there were carrots, celery, and onions in the pot. The veggies ended up as a very soft, intensely flavorful 'jam' of sorts, which was better than a gravy, I think. The dutch oven, which is new to us, worked wonderfully, and although it appeared that it was covered inside with 'baked-on' stuff, it cleaned very easily.

I'm not sure the effort was completely a success, however. The 3.3 lb brisket, flat cut, was relatively expensive ($8.99/lb), and in the end, was enough for the two of us, plus about enough leftovers for a single leftover dinner. Preparation was simple, though... the brisket was browned in a bit of olive oil, right in the dutch oven on the stove top, and I simply added the wine, stock, seasoning, and veggies, before putting into a 325 degree oven for about 5 hours.

I probably should try the same technique with a less expensive cut of meat... maybe a top or bottom round, which are a lot less expensive, but really suck when cooked in the ordinary fashion in the oven... they come out dry and tough. Braising for 5 hours ought to soften them up.

Peerie Maa
03-07-2016, 01:48 PM
Last night, I made Beef Stroganov. High hit with SWMBO.

Tonight is leftovers night. Shepherds' Pie made with last week's leftover pot-roasted pork shoulder.

Now that's a coincidence. Pork loin stroganoff with rice.

Ted Hoppe
03-09-2016, 03:53 PM
For Joe. Note - Preparation and presentation is everything.


There is always this....


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9YHhAjs-Ls

Nicholas Carey
03-20-2016, 09:09 PM
Started Corning a brisket last week. Pulled it out of the brine yesterday and roasted for 4 hours in a 300° F (gas Mark 2, 150° C) oven.

Used Michael Ruhlman's recipe here: http://ruhlman.com/2016/03/homemade-corned-beef/

With a 5% brine by weight. Ruhlman's pickling spice mix is wonderful!

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1526/25853843691_c1b52777d5_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/FoBGZH)IMG_1860.JPG by -Handforged- (https://flic.kr/p/FoBGZH)

Superb corned beef (and I'm usually fairly ambivalent about the stuff). Next time I think I'll do 6 or 8 hours in a 250° F oven.

CWSmith
03-20-2016, 09:13 PM
I've got to complain to someone.

Two days before St. Patrick's Day I asked 6 friends to meet me for corned been and Guinness. One by one, each apologized and said they were too busy. Workaholics! Good friends, but they need to relax just a little.

OK, back to the food...

Daniel Noyes
03-20-2016, 09:57 PM
Trump Steaks! it's "What's for dinner"

http://mlmhelp.com/wp-content/uploads/trumpsteaks.jpg

CWSmith
03-20-2016, 10:07 PM
^ I believe that Trump Steaks are no longer marketed.

Vince Brennan
03-20-2016, 10:39 PM
Wow. If you are near an Aldi's market, I recommend (really!!) their "rib-eye" steaks in a vacuum wrap. Just under $9.10/lb and they're appx. 1.12#/package. My wife and I can't eat even 1/2 of this apiece, so we divide into thirds, wrap with two pieces of thick-cut bacon, anoint with salt, garlic juice, garlic powder and a dollop of Lea & Perrin's, broil for 4 minutes a side, then leave to sit 7 minutes or so in the broiler with the 'broil' turned off.

Wow. Little tiny Ruth's Cris steaks, I kid you not!

Old Dryfoot
03-20-2016, 11:34 PM
Char Siu
Shanghai Noodle
Snow Peas
Egg Roll

The Bigfella
03-21-2016, 03:33 AM
Dinner? Not sure... let's call it a late lunch, at 3:30pm. Damned if I know why I haven't eaten there before... under the same roof as my apartment... same level even, a lady runs a tiny cafe - out of about a 3.5 m x 3.5 m shopfront.

I had (takeaway)... fried chicken - better than the Colonel's by far, with salad, rice, home-made mayonnaise and with miso soup. Lovely. Cost me $2.

Chip-skiff
03-21-2016, 03:20 PM
I call this Cheater's Pizza (and expect Joe and the other pizza maestros to rain curses upon my head).

Anyhow, I buy those grocery-store boxed pizzas, four, five or six cheese, on sale. I can start fairly late in the day, as opposed to sacrificing an hour or more of writing time to pizza dough. For my latest atrocity, I used a Safeway Signature Six-Cheese pizza with Flatbread Crust.

After a big party last fall, I vacuum-packed leftover grilled vegs: eggplant, zucchini, mushrooms, red and yellow peppers. Thawed out a packet and scattered the vegs on the pre-fab frozen pizza, then strewed ragged chunks of mozzarella thereupon.

The result was miraculously good—

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-iYMRjVkfM5w/VvBT_d6mHAI/AAAAAAAAJ9Y/zxaPZQtKBgEK7MfJr2SmIzX9o4HkILzLgCCo/s750-Ic42/vegpizza.jpg

I'm married to a legal scholar who specialises in climate change adaptation, so we're gradually reducing our meat/methane footprint. I love pepperoni and all manner of charcuterie, yet I did not for an instant miss having meat on this pizza.

Nicholas Carey
03-26-2016, 08:45 PM
Guacamole for appetizers.

Grind 4 chiles serrano (seeds and core removed -- we want chili flavor and not so much heat). Dice a half of a white onion and some cilantro. Then grind with some salt a mortar and pestle until you have a smooth paste:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1706/26057389785_1ef97a3594_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/FGAWa8)IMG_1868.JPG by -Handforged- (https://flic.kr/p/FGAWa8)

Stir in the juice of a lime. Then mash in 2 avocados until it's fairly smooth (but you want a few lumps). Then stir in 1/2 cup of diced tomato. Garnish with an avocado pit, along with a little diced onion and chopped tomato:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1586/26031465696_0ec17e6f47_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/FEj4Q5)IMG_1870.JPG by -Handforged- (https://flic.kr/p/FEj4Q5)

I was dubious about the difference making it in a mortar and pestle would make, but it really does intensifies the flavors. (The mortar and pestle is a Goodwill score).

Nicholas Carey
03-26-2016, 09:54 PM
The cocktail de nuit is the Corpse Reviver #2 (http://forgottencocktails.com/?p=1). A classic from 1930: equal parts gin, Cointreau, Lillet Blanc, and lemon juice...with a dash of absinthe.

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1643/25455998063_02430d3fb3.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/EMsDmk)IMG_1871.JPG by -Handforged- (https://flic.kr/p/EMsDmk)

Nicholas Carey
03-26-2016, 10:57 PM
And the main course tonight is risotto, with peas and diced chicken (separate, for kids who are dubious about the entire enterprise).

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1556/25456931483_74946ace37_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/EMxqPM)IMG_1872.JPG by -Handforged- (https://flic.kr/p/EMxqPM)

Peerie Maa
03-27-2016, 08:10 AM
In about three hours we will be enjoying slow roast shoulder of lamb or steak for the one who does not like lamb, roasted tatties and cauliflower cheese.

Old Dryfoot
03-27-2016, 10:15 AM
Jambalaya was on last night's menu. I have a pic, but it's stuck on my phone for now.

Chicken breast
Sweet basil Italian sausage
Smoked honey ham
Shrimp
Bell peppers
Onions
Celery
Garlic
Crushed plum tomatoes
Rice
White wine
Chicken broth
Cajun spice
Hot sauce
Salt
Cracked pepper

Joe (SoCal)
03-27-2016, 11:34 AM
Finally got around to getting one of those ceramic knives. I kinda like it, It feels like it has a microscopic serrated cutting edge. Perfect for tomatoes and no acid metal mix with a carbon steel blade.



https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/r270/12494774_10207317113939562_648158627553016741_n.jp g?oh=6e760f15bf0b37896c73ae1a9ecc78af&oe=57858C86

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xaf1/v/t1.0-9/r270/12249804_10207317133580053_8463387023927818416_n.j pg?oh=eaa7ed39f69f99ce1e966ecc28f2da15&oe=578035A4

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/r270/12321553_10207317133940062_3261488937244498210_n.j pg?oh=92810d1f62a9b4cd0e716f8ee31928dd&oe=577CB653

The Bigfella
03-27-2016, 12:05 PM
UN Irish Pub burger and chips... with a couple of pints of Guiness (which each cost more than the food).

Sometimes you just have to slum it. I enjoyed it... a refreshing change.

Peerie Maa
03-27-2016, 12:13 PM
UN Irish Pub burger and chips... with a couple of pints of Guiness (which each cost more than the food).

Sometimes you just have to slum it. I enjoyed it... a refreshing change.
That is Irish themed pubs, a rip off.

The Bigfella
03-27-2016, 12:19 PM
That is Irish themed pubs, a rip off.

I ended up there quite by chance. Was looking to go to another sports bar... didn't realise it was Sunday (walking street day)... and one of the main roads was blocked.... down the next one, there's the UN Irish... that'll do.

LeeG
03-27-2016, 12:32 PM
That is Irish themed pubs, a rip off.

I am in one right now. Not a rip-off. No tvs, right across from the laundromat and they like my grandaughter pics.

Chip-skiff
03-27-2016, 12:49 PM
The Uni has a Meats program so we bought a whole lamb, rather fatty but otherwise fine.

The leg, which is larger than the usual, is mostly a round, cut well above the joint. I'm going to flop it on the cutting board and bone it, with a thorough trim.

Then I'll decide whether to truss it as a boneless roast or butterfly it, which I've never done.

Norman Bernstein
03-27-2016, 01:31 PM
That is Irish themed pubs, a rip off.

I was in one, sort of, last night: the British Beer Company, which is a small northeast chain. Lots of British pub atmosphere, but the reason we go there is that the food is actually very good: the best burger I've ever had, for one thing. Last night, I had a special: short ribs, served on a bed of cheddar mashed potatoes, with roasted root vegetables... surprisingly good! The Yorkshire pudding served with it was sadly not up to the quality of the rest of the entree, though.

I'm a big fan of cooking boneless short ribs.... but they're incredibly expensive, in the supermarket.