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View Full Version : Gonna have to buy another vintage vehicle.



Jim Bow
01-06-2016, 01:57 AM
Used to be I'd get my jollies wrenching on old heaps. I went through a series of VWs, Willys, and Chev/GM pickups.
4 years ago we moved and I lost my large garage. No workspace anymore, plus lying on cold concrete has lost its luster. I bought a modern truck with an Ode-Dee-BB socket and I get to just sit there.
But now I've discovered a new tool, Ratcheting Open End Wrenches!!!!

Now I need a reason to buy a set. There's a 56 International Travelall down the street . . .

PeterSibley
01-06-2016, 02:31 AM
Cool. Is that the same chassis as a AA110?

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/9f/7c/44/9f7c448c1d2ceb2a11b2c2a7356e9bf1.jpg

lupussonic
01-06-2016, 02:39 AM
So you've come here to justify buying a vehicle you haven't got, to justify the tools you haven't got, in order to justify you're admiration for the tools..?

Do it.

Reynard38
01-06-2016, 07:44 AM
So you've come here to justify buying a vehicle you haven't got, to justify the tools you haven't got, in order to justify you're admiration for the tools..?

Do it.

And?

The Bigfella
01-06-2016, 07:53 AM
As you get older, motorbikes make much more sense than old cars

Garret
01-06-2016, 08:31 AM
And?

Yup. Made perfect sense to me too!

I think Jim should buy it! Also look for at least one spare for parts while he's at it. Oh, then there are some other tools that'll be needed as well...

George Jung
01-06-2016, 09:20 AM
It's a great 'addiction', and quite therapeutic. Highly recommend it.

BF - the 'problem' with the motorbikes is - then ya want to ride 'em. And the yahoos texting/driving can be 'troublesome'. Otherwise - agreed.

lupussonic
01-06-2016, 09:21 AM
And?

I said 'do it' didn't I?

Garret
01-06-2016, 09:26 AM
I said 'do it' didn't I?

I must admit I missed the "do it". My apologies!

Uncle Duke
01-06-2016, 10:11 AM
If you want a real project, how about this 1963 Unimog:
http://vpstestbringatrailercom.c.presscdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/00202_7tT1ACGH9DF_600x4501.jpg
http://bringatrailer.com/2016/01/05/5500-project-non-running-1963-mercedes-benz-unimog-404/

Or, for a lot less work, how about this nice little number:
http://vpstestbringatrailercom.c.presscdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/s-l72027-620x411.jpg
http://bringatrailer.com/2016/01/04/tasteful-updates-1952-studebaker-2r6/

ron ll
01-06-2016, 11:32 AM
Too bad I already sold this. Of course you wouldn't need any new tools because three wrenches fit just about everything on it.
(Actually I really miss it, just didn't have room to park it anymore.)

http://i1171.photobucket.com/albums/r560/ron_ll/truck4.jpg

Garret
01-06-2016, 11:36 AM
I've had 49, 51 & 54 Chevy pickups. The 51 was a 5 window with dual exhaust (2 3's - like a Jag) & the first Edelbrock manifold - 2 1 bbl Rochesters. What a fun truck!

Jim Bow
01-06-2016, 12:43 PM
I'm not usually tied to vehicles, but my 59 Chev 1/2 ton is missed.
I broke down, once, in downtown Seattle. Several bored homeless guys gathered around the open hood and offered suggestions. I took the top off the air cleaner, and one of them pointed out all the oil in there. That must be the problem!
AAA rescued me.
As I sat in traffic one day, a pretty girl in a convertible TT gave me a thumb's up.

Canoeyawl
01-06-2016, 01:05 PM
Too bad I already sold this. Of course you wouldn't need any new tools because three wrenches fit just about everything on it.
(Actually I really miss it, just didn't have room to park it anymore.)

http://i1171.photobucket.com/albums/r560/ron_ll/truck4.jpg

Three wrenches and four very special screwdrivers!

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b7/Clutch_head_screw.jpg/220px-Clutch_head_screw.jpg

lupussonic
01-06-2016, 02:28 PM
This is plenty to keep me off the streets.
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/27991552/9%C2%A3%20boat/IMG_1672.JPG

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/27991552/9%C2%A3%20boat/IMG_1067.JPG

Landrover..."can't keep fluids in, can't keep 'em out"

Garret
01-06-2016, 02:31 PM
But do you have a good supply of Lucas Smoke?

Joking aside, I'd love a diesel 110. My brother has one (in a long line of 'em).

Garret
01-06-2016, 02:32 PM
Three wrenches and four very special screwdrivers!

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b7/Clutch_head_screw.jpg/220px-Clutch_head_screw.jpg

Ah - but you need clutch drive if you're gonna work on old mobile homes & travel trailers too!

oznabrag
01-06-2016, 03:01 PM
Ah - but you need clutch drive if you're gonna work on old mobile homes & travel trailers too!

It's my understanding that Ford was going to use Robertson screws, but he wanted to loosen up the specs so they would cam out on the assembly line, and not strip threads.

Robertson said no, so Ford went to the good old Phillips, which cams out nicely.

That's what I heard.

Canoeyawl
01-06-2016, 03:14 PM
Phillips are self-centering and have some advantages for speed and accuracy which likely overrode the need for torque.

The early Fords used slotted screws and square nuts. I don't know how they made that work on a production line.

(After watching a powered slotted screw-driver slip out on the hull of a boat and having it cut, chip and ruin the finish as it marched along the plank until it stopped spinning, I sort of swore them off unless driving them by hand.)

stromborg
01-06-2016, 05:49 PM
https://stromborg.smugmug.com/Cars/Vanagon/i-ChtqkKS/0/XL/IMGP0084-XL.jpg

I'm having trouble staying motivated on this one. Sanding a 20' glued-lap boat was bad enough, just thinking about prepping this for fresh paint wears me out.

PeterSibley
01-06-2016, 05:59 PM
Phillips are self-centering and have some advantages for speed and accuracy which likely overrode the need for torque.

The early Fords used slotted screws and square nuts. I don't know how they made that work on a production line.

(After watching a powered slotted screw-driver slip out on the hull of a boat and having it cut, chip and ruin the finish as it marched along the plank until it stopped spinning, I sort of swore them off unless driving them by hand.)

If I want to power drive slotted screws I use one of these, the sleeve slides down and keeps the bit in the slot but you have to keep the pressure on.

http://static.hardwarestore.com/media/product/635717_front500.jpg

Garret
01-06-2016, 06:02 PM
I'm having trouble staying motivated on this one. Sanding a 20' glued-lap boat was bad enough, just thinking about prepping this for fresh paint wears me out.

I get that. While I'll tackle most anything, autobody work is not one of 'em. Especially large flat panels.

TXdoug
01-06-2016, 08:32 PM
I'm with Jim on those ratcheting wrenches. I used a buddies Harbor Fright 10 mm on his loose and missing turbo bolts a while back. I was unable to break it so I had my super size buddy try, it held so I bought me a set. These turbo bolts are 12 pt. so no open end wrench and no fit for even a slim 1/4 drive socket. Ratchet wrench to the rescue, I'm sold.

I'll hold off buying a classic, my 01 F350 will be one soon enough:)

Garret
01-06-2016, 08:40 PM
I'm with Jim on those ratcheting wrenches. I used a buddies Harbor Fright 10 mm on his loose and missing turbo bolts a while back. I was unable to break it so I had my super size buddy try, it held so I bought me a set. These turbo bolts are 12 pt. so no open end wrench and no fit for even a slim 1/4 drive socket. Ratchet wrench to the rescue, I'm sold.

I'll hold off buying a classic, my 01 F350 will be one soon enough:)

Nah - it's just a good ol' truck until at least 25 years.

Jim Bow
01-07-2016, 12:29 AM
It's my understanding that Ford was going to use Robertson screws, but he wanted to loosen up the specs so they would cam out on the assembly line, and not strip threads.

Robertson said no, so Ford went to the good old Phillips, which cams out nicely.

That's what I heard.
I heard that Ford would only do a deal if he could manufacture the screws. Robertson refused to give up quality control and said no.

Jimmy W
01-07-2016, 01:01 AM
I saw this last week. It didn't seem to be for sale, but would like to see it restored.

http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd41/jimmywga/Benoit%20Packard%201_zpsrccrqcsj.jpg

stromborg
01-07-2016, 04:47 PM
Before jumping in on the VW project I picked up an 18v cordless impact driver (Rigid in this case but there are others) it has been great for getting out a pretty broad assortment of otherwise stuck Phillips-type fasteners without stripping the heads.

Hugh MacD
01-08-2016, 01:48 AM
British cars don't leak...they mark their territory.

lupussonic
01-08-2016, 08:30 AM
^ mine does, like a naughty puppy everywhere I park it. I call them maintenance leaks; I am so aware of exactly where my gearbox oil level is, I'm involved.

skaraborgcraft
01-08-2016, 10:05 AM
I still miss my old classic Range Rovers, but the time i have availiable for other projects has increased a lot since they were sold on. I no longer have a relationship with my vehicle, i just get in it and drive it and i have not once needed to get my hands dirty in the last 4 years (except changing over to winter tyres). Downside, cant bung an old leaking diesel engine in the back or load more than 75kg of timber on the roof, no more towing 3.5 ton or driving "through" the forest just because you can. A happy 10+ year working relationship in which i learnt a lot more about welding........