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Paul Pless
01-05-2016, 01:39 PM
What do you cook? what kind of wok? flat or round bottom? material? stove type?

Peerie Maa
01-05-2016, 01:49 PM
Stir fries and curries. Always flat bottomed as the previous hob wouldn't handle round. We have used a plain steel one, but are now using non stick. The current hob is gas with a wok burner ring.

Garret
01-05-2016, 01:51 PM
For years, until I can no longer cook in iron.

Round bottom on a ring over gas. Curries, "stir fries", fried rice, scrambled eggs, spaghetti sauce (which cleans the wok beautifully, btw ;)) - pretty much everything

Norman Bernstein
01-05-2016, 01:56 PM
I do, for 'Chinese' dishes (which, when compared with Chinese take-out, seems to come fairly close).

I've had the advantage of watching how REAL Chinese chefs do it... they use a round-bottomed wok, and a stove which has a cylindrical metal collar and an open flame within it, turned up REALLY high. They first cook the protein (chicken, pork, beef, whatever) by itself, rapidly, using the stir-fry technique, with a 'shovel' implement.... and then, when the protein is cooked, they remove it from the wok, and place it on a strainer so the excess oil can drip off. They then cook the vegetables, add the various sauce ingredients, and then add the protein back to the wok for a final stir-fry.

Well, I don't have a stove like that... so my wok has a flat portion on the bottom. My stove is electric, unfortunately, but I can turn it up full blast. My cooking method is pretty much exactly what the Chinese chefs do: stir fry the proteins, put them on a strainer to drain, stir fry the veggies, add the sauce ingredients, and then add the proteins back and stir-fry to coat everything with the sauce... it comes out great.

Here's a tip: if you're doing chicken, partially freeze the chicken breasts to make them easier to slice. Cut two or three long strips, longitudinally, and then cross-cut in thin (1/4") slices... this results in thin pieces which are cut across the grain of the meat, so they cook very quickly, and are very tender.

For a typical sauce: 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar, 1/4 cup soy sauce, 1 tbsp hoisin sauce, 1 tsp chili paste with garlic. At the very end, thicken with cornstarch dissolved in water, but go easy, or you'll have a gloppy mess... a little goes a long way.

TomF
01-05-2016, 02:00 PM
Herself's parents once gave us a wok-shaped object - cast iron with a flat bottom and enamelled on the outside, with a nice see-through lid. It's great to cook in; we usually do stir-fries with it.

A very long ways from a thin steel wok in a ring over a gas flame though.

Peerie Maa
01-05-2016, 02:08 PM
Here's a tip: if you're doing chicken, partially freeze the chicken breasts to make them easier to slice. Cut two or three long strips, longitudinally, and then cross-cut in thin (1/4") slices... this results in thin pieces which are cut across the grain of the meat, so they cook very quickly, and are very tender.



There is a difference between Occidental and Oriental tastes. The Chinese like their meat chewy.

JTA
01-05-2016, 02:23 PM
Round bottom carbon steel wok from http://www.wokshop.com
Stove type typically my medium Green Egg of course, when not on the Green Egg I use a charcoal chimney as a stove.

Jack

Figment
01-05-2016, 02:28 PM
When I had a gas range I was a wok-cooking fiend.

I miss those days.

Upshur
01-05-2016, 02:40 PM
I wok my dogs.

Steve McMahon
01-05-2016, 03:05 PM
I use my wok at least twice a week. Higher end Paderno stainless steel with flat bottom on an electric stove. Stir fry veggies, vegetable and beef stir fry, chicken and vegetable stir fry, cut up sausage and vegetable stir fry (tonight). Cook veggies first, starting with the slower cooking ones first, put them aside in a bowl while you stir fry the meat, when the meat is done add some broth and thicken if desired, add back in the veggies and heat for a couple of minutes. Healthy and tasty.

TomZ
01-05-2016, 03:30 PM
I have a restaurant size plain steel wok, round bottom, has a cover. It works great for camp cooking over the fire. I like to pile in 3lbs bacon, turn until done, then splash a doz eggs into the grease to cook till the whites are done, remove with a slotted spatula. Might throw in some cut-up sweet potatoes till crisp. Save the fat for supper cooking, maybe some fish.

Plus, it's self leveling :-)

So glad we can eat like our grandparents again.

paulf
01-05-2016, 03:49 PM
Yes all the time, most stir fries. The trick is to have a real heat source good gas stove or outside propane burner.

Need white heat and short cook time for real Wok hay!

Hammered steel, extremely hot flame, short cook time, all fresh ingredients, get a good Chinese cook book!!

John of Phoenix
01-05-2016, 04:04 PM
What do you cook? what kind of wok? flat or round bottom? material? stove type?I got a Christmas gift certificate I can't wait to use - "Chef for a night at Benihana for 8 friends".

It states - "Sharp knives and hot stoves can be dangerous." My heart's all aflutter.

Assuming I survive, I'll bump this up after doing it.