PDA

View Full Version : Thickness Sander



TomFF
01-14-2004, 09:39 PM
I just about finished a thickness sander made to the plans I found at Home Built Sander (http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/abertin/SanderPlan.html)(one of my winter projects). The drum has a slight flat spot. I built the stand with 2x4's instead of the maple- and upgraded the table and drum a bit. I had an old motor- it cost little to build it.

In any case I remember someone here built one as well. I'm wondering about the best method of sandpaper attachment. Any suggestions?

TomFF
01-14-2004, 09:39 PM
I just about finished a thickness sander made to the plans I found at Home Built Sander (http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/abertin/SanderPlan.html)(one of my winter projects). The drum has a slight flat spot. I built the stand with 2x4's instead of the maple- and upgraded the table and drum a bit. I had an old motor- it cost little to build it.

In any case I remember someone here built one as well. I'm wondering about the best method of sandpaper attachment. Any suggestions?

TomFF
01-14-2004, 09:39 PM
I just about finished a thickness sander made to the plans I found at Home Built Sander (http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/abertin/SanderPlan.html)(one of my winter projects). The drum has a slight flat spot. I built the stand with 2x4's instead of the maple- and upgraded the table and drum a bit. I had an old motor- it cost little to build it.

In any case I remember someone here built one as well. I'm wondering about the best method of sandpaper attachment. Any suggestions?

Todd Bradshaw
01-15-2004, 02:27 AM
Some of the wood/canvas canoe builders use big drum sanders for sanding ribs before they're put into the boat. Paddle makers use them for shaping blades, too. They don't thickness-sand as such, but rather hold the piece down by hand against the top of the spinning drum. They generally have a small recessed slot across the drum and a metal strip which fits into it and is held by screws fitting into threaded holes in the drum. The ends of the paper are bent down into the slot and held by the tightened metal strip. I guess the key is getting the recess deep enough that the strip is slightly below the drum's surface level and doesn't hit the work.

Todd Bradshaw
01-15-2004, 02:27 AM
Some of the wood/canvas canoe builders use big drum sanders for sanding ribs before they're put into the boat. Paddle makers use them for shaping blades, too. They don't thickness-sand as such, but rather hold the piece down by hand against the top of the spinning drum. They generally have a small recessed slot across the drum and a metal strip which fits into it and is held by screws fitting into threaded holes in the drum. The ends of the paper are bent down into the slot and held by the tightened metal strip. I guess the key is getting the recess deep enough that the strip is slightly below the drum's surface level and doesn't hit the work.

Todd Bradshaw
01-15-2004, 02:27 AM
Some of the wood/canvas canoe builders use big drum sanders for sanding ribs before they're put into the boat. Paddle makers use them for shaping blades, too. They don't thickness-sand as such, but rather hold the piece down by hand against the top of the spinning drum. They generally have a small recessed slot across the drum and a metal strip which fits into it and is held by screws fitting into threaded holes in the drum. The ends of the paper are bent down into the slot and held by the tightened metal strip. I guess the key is getting the recess deep enough that the strip is slightly below the drum's surface level and doesn't hit the work.

essaunders
01-15-2004, 07:20 AM
I'm not sure if this will work for your application, but I've used rubber cement on several occasions to attach sandpaper to (small) sanding blocks. In fact, when I couldn't get a rough enough grit for my random orbit sander I cut a circle of the rough stuff and cemented it to a (worn) piece that had the hook'n'loop backing my sander uses. When the paper gets clogged or worn I just peeled it off and put on a new piece with a bit more cement.

essaunders
01-15-2004, 07:20 AM
I'm not sure if this will work for your application, but I've used rubber cement on several occasions to attach sandpaper to (small) sanding blocks. In fact, when I couldn't get a rough enough grit for my random orbit sander I cut a circle of the rough stuff and cemented it to a (worn) piece that had the hook'n'loop backing my sander uses. When the paper gets clogged or worn I just peeled it off and put on a new piece with a bit more cement.

essaunders
01-15-2004, 07:20 AM
I'm not sure if this will work for your application, but I've used rubber cement on several occasions to attach sandpaper to (small) sanding blocks. In fact, when I couldn't get a rough enough grit for my random orbit sander I cut a circle of the rough stuff and cemented it to a (worn) piece that had the hook'n'loop backing my sander uses. When the paper gets clogged or worn I just peeled it off and put on a new piece with a bit more cement.

Jim H
01-15-2004, 11:13 AM
That would be Bruce Taylor's Homemade Thickness Sander (http://media5.hypernet.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=001090). :cool:

Jim H
01-15-2004, 11:13 AM
That would be Bruce Taylor's Homemade Thickness Sander (http://media5.hypernet.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=001090). :cool:

Jim H
01-15-2004, 11:13 AM
That would be Bruce Taylor's Homemade Thickness Sander (http://media5.hypernet.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=001090). :cool:

Tom Lathrop
01-15-2004, 01:16 PM
Best way I've seen to attach sandpaper to a drum is to use a roll about three or four inches wide and wrap it in a spiral from one of teh drum to the other. That way, the only attachment points are at the ends out of the way of the piece you are sanding. You can use a solid mechanical fastening on the ends of the drum along with a spray cement like 3M 77 to hold it in place.

Tom Lathrop
01-15-2004, 01:16 PM
Best way I've seen to attach sandpaper to a drum is to use a roll about three or four inches wide and wrap it in a spiral from one of teh drum to the other. That way, the only attachment points are at the ends out of the way of the piece you are sanding. You can use a solid mechanical fastening on the ends of the drum along with a spray cement like 3M 77 to hold it in place.

Tom Lathrop
01-15-2004, 01:16 PM
Best way I've seen to attach sandpaper to a drum is to use a roll about three or four inches wide and wrap it in a spiral from one of teh drum to the other. That way, the only attachment points are at the ends out of the way of the piece you are sanding. You can use a solid mechanical fastening on the ends of the drum along with a spray cement like 3M 77 to hold it in place.

TomFF
01-15-2004, 10:24 PM
Tom that what the plans recommend- but it seems to shorten the width of the table. I need to get to .05". Seems to me that the tape will get in the way. Of course I could saw off an inch of the table (and may need to. But its a last resort.

TomFF
01-15-2004, 10:24 PM
Tom that what the plans recommend- but it seems to shorten the width of the table. I need to get to .05". Seems to me that the tape will get in the way. Of course I could saw off an inch of the table (and may need to. But its a last resort.

TomFF
01-15-2004, 10:24 PM
Tom that what the plans recommend- but it seems to shorten the width of the table. I need to get to .05". Seems to me that the tape will get in the way. Of course I could saw off an inch of the table (and may need to. But its a last resort.

capt jake
01-15-2004, 10:40 PM
Tom, have you looked at the link provided? Bruce really did a fine job on his! smile.gif He addressed the sandpaper issue on about the third reply.

Man, I gotta build me one of these.... Oops, I need to add onto the shop first! smile.gif

capt jake
01-15-2004, 10:40 PM
Tom, have you looked at the link provided? Bruce really did a fine job on his! smile.gif He addressed the sandpaper issue on about the third reply.

Man, I gotta build me one of these.... Oops, I need to add onto the shop first! smile.gif

capt jake
01-15-2004, 10:40 PM
Tom, have you looked at the link provided? Bruce really did a fine job on his! smile.gif He addressed the sandpaper issue on about the third reply.

Man, I gotta build me one of these.... Oops, I need to add onto the shop first! smile.gif

Bruce Taylor
01-16-2004, 08:25 AM
As I mentioned in the other thread, I use rolls of 4"-wide sandpaper, wrapped in a spiral around the drum. The ends are held down with two-sided carpet tape, so I don't lose any drum width. I take two turns w/ the 2" carpet tape, which gives me 4" of sticky surface at each end of the drum. I usually don't apply any tape to the central part of the drum, but I've tried it, and it works well.

When you've spiral-wrapped the entire drum, you'll be left with a "wedge" of exposed carpet tape at each end. You still have the use of the entire drum, but the ends have less abrasive. This doesn't seem to affect the work, but it looks funky. So, if I'm feeling meticulous, I cut a piece of paper to fit these areas. This doesn't require any great effort. The "wedge" is a right-angle triangle, I just insert a square corner of paper in the area, press it down onto the carpet tape, and cut off the overhang w/ an exacto knife.

Spiral wrapping is pretty standard on these machines (several commercial models rely on it). There are other approaches. Some people use sheets of cloth-backed abrasive (floor-sanding paper, for instance). This system typically calls for some sort of slotted "hold-down" in the drum (as described by Todd, above). There are various designs around, but most involve cutting a groove along the length of the drum and shaping a metal bar to fit snugly in the slot. The paper goes under the bar, and the bar is held in place by countersunk screws. This leaves a narrow gap in the abrasive, but evidently that doesn't cause problems.

Good luck.

[ 01-16-2004, 10:08 AM: Message edited by: Bruce Taylor ]

Bruce Taylor
01-16-2004, 08:25 AM
As I mentioned in the other thread, I use rolls of 4"-wide sandpaper, wrapped in a spiral around the drum. The ends are held down with two-sided carpet tape, so I don't lose any drum width. I take two turns w/ the 2" carpet tape, which gives me 4" of sticky surface at each end of the drum. I usually don't apply any tape to the central part of the drum, but I've tried it, and it works well.

When you've spiral-wrapped the entire drum, you'll be left with a "wedge" of exposed carpet tape at each end. You still have the use of the entire drum, but the ends have less abrasive. This doesn't seem to affect the work, but it looks funky. So, if I'm feeling meticulous, I cut a piece of paper to fit these areas. This doesn't require any great effort. The "wedge" is a right-angle triangle, I just insert a square corner of paper in the area, press it down onto the carpet tape, and cut off the overhang w/ an exacto knife.

Spiral wrapping is pretty standard on these machines (several commercial models rely on it). There are other approaches. Some people use sheets of cloth-backed abrasive (floor-sanding paper, for instance). This system typically calls for some sort of slotted "hold-down" in the drum (as described by Todd, above). There are various designs around, but most involve cutting a groove along the length of the drum and shaping a metal bar to fit snugly in the slot. The paper goes under the bar, and the bar is held in place by countersunk screws. This leaves a narrow gap in the abrasive, but evidently that doesn't cause problems.

Good luck.

[ 01-16-2004, 10:08 AM: Message edited by: Bruce Taylor ]

Bruce Taylor
01-16-2004, 08:25 AM
As I mentioned in the other thread, I use rolls of 4"-wide sandpaper, wrapped in a spiral around the drum. The ends are held down with two-sided carpet tape, so I don't lose any drum width. I take two turns w/ the 2" carpet tape, which gives me 4" of sticky surface at each end of the drum. I usually don't apply any tape to the central part of the drum, but I've tried it, and it works well.

When you've spiral-wrapped the entire drum, you'll be left with a "wedge" of exposed carpet tape at each end. You still have the use of the entire drum, but the ends have less abrasive. This doesn't seem to affect the work, but it looks funky. So, if I'm feeling meticulous, I cut a piece of paper to fit these areas. This doesn't require any great effort. The "wedge" is a right-angle triangle, I just insert a square corner of paper in the area, press it down onto the carpet tape, and cut off the overhang w/ an exacto knife.

Spiral wrapping is pretty standard on these machines (several commercial models rely on it). There are other approaches. Some people use sheets of cloth-backed abrasive (floor-sanding paper, for instance). This system typically calls for some sort of slotted "hold-down" in the drum (as described by Todd, above). There are various designs around, but most involve cutting a groove along the length of the drum and shaping a metal bar to fit snugly in the slot. The paper goes under the bar, and the bar is held in place by countersunk screws. This leaves a narrow gap in the abrasive, but evidently that doesn't cause problems.

Good luck.

[ 01-16-2004, 10:08 AM: Message edited by: Bruce Taylor ]

Dave R
01-16-2004, 09:21 AM
One of these days, I'll have to build one of these. I like Bruce's design but appreciate the link to this other one.

I had a heck of a time getting all the images to download on a single page with my T1 connection. I ended up loading them one at a time and thought others might want to do the same.

Start with this link: http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/abertin/pictures/page1.jpg and change the page number for each successive picture. i.e. page2.jpg, page3.jpg, etc.

Dave R
01-16-2004, 09:21 AM
One of these days, I'll have to build one of these. I like Bruce's design but appreciate the link to this other one.

I had a heck of a time getting all the images to download on a single page with my T1 connection. I ended up loading them one at a time and thought others might want to do the same.

Start with this link: http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/abertin/pictures/page1.jpg and change the page number for each successive picture. i.e. page2.jpg, page3.jpg, etc.

Dave R
01-16-2004, 09:21 AM
One of these days, I'll have to build one of these. I like Bruce's design but appreciate the link to this other one.

I had a heck of a time getting all the images to download on a single page with my T1 connection. I ended up loading them one at a time and thought others might want to do the same.

Start with this link: http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/abertin/pictures/page1.jpg and change the page number for each successive picture. i.e. page2.jpg, page3.jpg, etc.

Bruce Taylor
01-16-2004, 11:46 AM
I like Bruce's design but appreciate the link to this other one.They're very similar...both knockoffs of the devices luthiers have been building on the cheap for decades. Wood magazine's "elevation control" seems more complex than it needs to be. I rarely need the very simple locking mechanism on my machine, but when I do it works well enough. A bar-clamp type quick-adjust mechanism wd. be a nice feature, though. The 5/8" shaft seems a little skimpy...I've heard complaints of shafts vibrating and bouncing. I see they use epoxy to attach the drum to the shaft. Seems practical, and a bit easier than my captured rod.

Bruce Taylor
01-16-2004, 11:46 AM
I like Bruce's design but appreciate the link to this other one.They're very similar...both knockoffs of the devices luthiers have been building on the cheap for decades. Wood magazine's "elevation control" seems more complex than it needs to be. I rarely need the very simple locking mechanism on my machine, but when I do it works well enough. A bar-clamp type quick-adjust mechanism wd. be a nice feature, though. The 5/8" shaft seems a little skimpy...I've heard complaints of shafts vibrating and bouncing. I see they use epoxy to attach the drum to the shaft. Seems practical, and a bit easier than my captured rod.

Bruce Taylor
01-16-2004, 11:46 AM
I like Bruce's design but appreciate the link to this other one.They're very similar...both knockoffs of the devices luthiers have been building on the cheap for decades. Wood magazine's "elevation control" seems more complex than it needs to be. I rarely need the very simple locking mechanism on my machine, but when I do it works well enough. A bar-clamp type quick-adjust mechanism wd. be a nice feature, though. The 5/8" shaft seems a little skimpy...I've heard complaints of shafts vibrating and bouncing. I see they use epoxy to attach the drum to the shaft. Seems practical, and a bit easier than my captured rod.

TomFF
01-16-2004, 10:27 PM
Making the drum was a lot easier than I thought it would be. I used smooth-on epoxy- a thick 2 part eppoxy used by bowyers (requires heat). In any case I got the flat spots out of the drum and it runs pretty sweet- no wobble, and the drum doesn't produce waves in the wood.

I wondered if I needed to build the locking mechanism. In the end I did but as Bruce says it does not appear all that necessary. On the other hand it does provide a great deal of control.

TomFF
01-16-2004, 10:27 PM
Making the drum was a lot easier than I thought it would be. I used smooth-on epoxy- a thick 2 part eppoxy used by bowyers (requires heat). In any case I got the flat spots out of the drum and it runs pretty sweet- no wobble, and the drum doesn't produce waves in the wood.

I wondered if I needed to build the locking mechanism. In the end I did but as Bruce says it does not appear all that necessary. On the other hand it does provide a great deal of control.

TomFF
01-16-2004, 10:27 PM
Making the drum was a lot easier than I thought it would be. I used smooth-on epoxy- a thick 2 part eppoxy used by bowyers (requires heat). In any case I got the flat spots out of the drum and it runs pretty sweet- no wobble, and the drum doesn't produce waves in the wood.

I wondered if I needed to build the locking mechanism. In the end I did but as Bruce says it does not appear all that necessary. On the other hand it does provide a great deal of control.