PDA

View Full Version : The best way to chocolate



L.W. Baxter
12-28-2015, 08:50 PM
I got a Toblerone in my stocking. I'm far from a connoisseur, but this may be the best chocolate I've tasted.

I'm sure I will be up for some ridicule for my pedestrian taste. Lay it on me, what kind of chocolate should I enjoy more than Toblerone?

Paul Pless
12-28-2015, 08:55 PM
what kind of chocolate should I enjoy more than Toblerone?I'm kinda fond of those fat Reese's peanut butter cups. Do they count as 'chocolate'? What about Hershey bars with almonds?

lupussonic
12-28-2015, 08:56 PM
Toblerone's are a laxative in quantity. It won't come out in triangles.

My my favourite milk chocolate is Green and Blacks . stunning

StevenBauer
12-28-2015, 08:58 PM
I'm a big Toblerone fan but I've recently been converted to this stuff: https://www.blackdinahchocolatiers.com

ron ll
12-28-2015, 09:12 PM
Oh boy. Is this going to be just like a coffee thread? Chocolate is no good unless it has been thru a monkey and an old sock. :D

C. Ross
12-28-2015, 09:13 PM
Oh boy. Is this going to be just like a coffee thread? Chocolate is no good unless it has been thru a monkey and an old sock. :D

:D I just lost my appetite for chocolate.

ron ll
12-28-2015, 09:26 PM
Seriously tho, we like Dilettante for high end, Fran's is okay for middle of the road, and See's when you just need a fix.

Breakaway
12-28-2015, 09:37 PM
Try the salt thing.Also, try rolling/ dipping chocolate in cocoa powder. Yum.

Full disclosure: My grandmother worked at Baricini candy , so as a little boy I recieved all kinds of formal chocolate training.
https://www.philaathenaeum.org/stelman/S07/143-P-218-003.jpg

Kevin

David G
12-28-2015, 09:44 PM
See's is a family holiday tradition. I am partial to their fudge, and their marzipan in dark chocolate. This year, we added raspberry cremes to the mix, and they went quickest of all.

Then there are several local 'boutique' makers. Moonstuck is one I've tried several times, and each has been excellent.

David G
12-28-2015, 10:23 PM
twodot -- looks delightful!

Breakaway
12-28-2015, 10:25 PM
Twodot, you are cruel, cruel I say! Now, I need almonds, I need chocolate! It is late here! Dang! :)

Kevin

SMARTINSEN
12-28-2015, 10:30 PM
Trader Joes is good.

http://www.jinifit.com/chocolate/Trader_Joes_Chocolate.jpg

Joe (SoCal)
12-28-2015, 10:35 PM
Anything above 72% taste likes eating dirt.

I have a soft spot for Lindt

Vince Brennan
12-28-2015, 10:47 PM
Oh boy. Is this going to be just like a coffee thread? Chocolate is no good unless it has been thru a monkey and an old sock. :D


:D I just lost my appetite for chocolate.
I just lost my appetite for monkeys...

seanz
12-29-2015, 01:36 AM
What chocolate should you like more than "Tobler-one"? Why not none? What's wrong with having a favorite?

But, if you want to expand your horizons, I'll second Lindt...and I'll third, fourth and fifth that high cocoa chocolate tastes like dirt. Different when I first tried it but really, a higher cocoa content than cooking chocolate? Why?

Domesticated_Mr. Know It All
12-29-2015, 04:30 AM
This stuff over pretzels.



http://lh6.ggpht.com/XBbbc9Zmo8P-FxzRqOUimN8bChmFmLsFofLlkA15sUU9kmlxxAuvIvlkIgjllF A3A0uS1PU88LHDVp4DfqUVBjk=s480-c-e365

P.I. Stazzer-Newt
12-29-2015, 04:36 AM
J D Gross.

Trinidad, Ecuador or Amazon.

Ask lefty.

David W Pratt
12-29-2015, 05:52 AM
Not a chochoholic, but Leonidas is my touchstone

Peerie Maa
12-29-2015, 06:12 AM
I much prefer dark chocolate over milk. Some milks have a greasy feel on the palate. Toblerone is great, but dark Toblerone is better.

Peerie Maa
12-29-2015, 06:56 PM
For solid chocolate I like milk better than dark. Sweet tooth, maybe. I used to get 10 pound bars of Callebaut milk for dipping, and it was difficult not to keep breaking chunks off and eating them.

Chocolate plus hazelnuts is sublime, proof of the existence of the divine. In the pacific northwest they are called filberts. I realized this after going to three supermarkets and wondering why they didn't have hazelnuts. In each market I stared at the bins of filberts, thinking that they look a lot like hazelnuts.

I was once given some fresh black walnuts from North Carolina. I dipped them raw in dark. Holy crap, that was good.

I don't like chocolate plus fruit. Chocolate covered cherries or strawberries, uh huh. Don't even like to think of chocolate covered raisins. This is common, I think, and so is the opposite sentiment.
This:
http://www.svifresh.com/image/data/C01.jpg
is for you then.

pkrone
12-29-2015, 07:35 PM
The Maui Wowie is a tasty dark chocolate bar. Sadly, never seen it outside of Maui...

Dave Gray
12-29-2015, 07:45 PM
La Suissa Gianduia pistachio is quite yummy. Perugina chocolates are pretty good too. But anything chocolate works, preferably dark. Chocolate chips with almonds, who needs more?

ron ll
12-29-2015, 08:01 PM
I'm a PNW native and always called them hazelnuts. And there is a candy store in Edmonds that sells a certain brand of dark chocolate cherry cordials that are knockouts. We buy them for each other at Christmas and I bought hers early. By the time she went to buy mine they were out. I think I should get half of hers. Not sure she agrees.

Nicholas Scheuer
12-29-2015, 08:34 PM
What? No post from Donn?

L.W. Baxter
12-30-2015, 12:17 AM
...Chocolate plus hazelnuts is sublime, proof of the existence of the divine. In the pacific northwest they are called filberts. I realized this after going to three supermarkets and wondering why they didn't have hazelnuts. In each market I stared at the bins of filberts, thinking that they look a lot like hazelnuts.

Those nuts were improperly labeled. Hazelnuts come from filbert orchards.

I agree, hazelnuts or almonds +chocolate is the bees knees.

Todd Bradshaw
12-30-2015, 01:51 AM
Back in the early 1970s we used to sell Toblerone bars in our backpacking store - until they started getting that white residue on them and the customers started griping about them. We finally pulled them off the shelf and ate them. They were still really good. Between that, the Cotlets and Aplets, the super smoky beef jerky from an Indian reservation in South Dakota, and the freeze-dried ice cream we ate while working, I don't think we ever made any money selling food. Then we got dextrose "energy" tablets, kind of like supercharged PEZ. Old ladies who could barely make it up the steps would buy them - thinking they would eat a couple and then go sprinting down the street.

Arizona Bay
12-30-2015, 09:53 PM
Did you know there is a Chocolate Shaman?

Looks like a powerful brew.

http://ceremonialcacao.blogspot.mx/2011/08/cacao-preparation-and-use.html

elf
12-30-2015, 10:21 PM
Green and Black is very good chocolate, but Guittard is much better.

In New England once can purchase Guittard in blocks in the cheese department in the supermarket, and one can puchase Guittard chocolate chips in Christmas Tree shops.

Of the commercial chocolate in the marketplace Guittard and Caillebaut are the best.

A good specialty shop will have bars of many even better products for quite high prices. Once you eat a chocolate which is between 72% and 80% you will probably not find any cheap eommercial chocolate like Toblerone very attractive any longer. Hot chocolate made with Guittard or Caillebaut should cure you of bothering with that cheap stuff.

elf
12-30-2015, 10:23 PM
Filberts are great, true, but try specks of candied lime peel or lemon peel or candied ginger.

Or a really good Grand Marnier ganache.

Dave Gray
12-30-2015, 11:05 PM
Since it is an Oregon brand, I need to mention Moonstruck Chocolates. I like some, others not so much. Ritter dark hazelnut bars are almost too sweet but good. I can be picky but in a pinch anything will do.

David G
12-31-2015, 10:15 AM
Since it is an Oregon brand, I need to mention Moonstruck Chocolates. I like some, others not so much. Ritter dark hazelnut bars are almost too sweet but good. I can be picky but in a pinch anything will do.

Yes, I mentioned Moonstruck. Also in Portland: JaCiva; Alma; Missionary; Cacoa Drink; Creo; Cup&Bar; and more...

Any local chocolatier will have its specialties. Well worth exploring. And even an impecunious sawdust-monger like myself can afford to sample a truffle, or a mug of hot chocolate on occasion.

cathouse willy
12-31-2015, 06:46 PM
not gourmet chocolate but this recipe makes a very good rich heavy pie.


Chocolate Pie




It's rich, decadent, and intensely chocolate. It makes 1 pie.

You will need:

1 Deep Pie crust
4 oz. of Baker's Unsweetened Chocolate
1 stick of butter [1/4 lb]
4 egg yolks
1/2 pint of Half and Half
2 cups of sugar
2 tbsps of flour
1/2 tsp of vanilla



In a double boiler, put the half/half, butter, and chocolate in and whisk slowly until it combines together, around 7 minutes.
Sift or combine the sugar and flour and add it to the chocolate mixture and continue whisking. Beat the egg yolks and add them immediately.
If you take too much time and let the choclolate mixture get too hot to add eggs, take some out and temper the eggs and chocolate before adding them into the double boiler. Slowly whisk for 10 to 13 minutes until the sugar dissolves and thickens a little bit.
It won't be super thick, just thicker than when it started. Pour it into the pie crust and then into a pre-heated 375 degree oven for 25 minutes or until the crust is golden brown.
When you take it out it will look like chocolate soup. This is normal. Let it rest on the counter for an hour, then refrigerate overnight.
If you make it in the morning, it should be OK by dinner time. You can microwave it for 10 seconds before adding whipped cream (NO COOL WHIP!)and it's chocolate love.This ain't no chocolate cream pie. When you pick it up it's heavy (a sign that it's a good pie!)

L.W. Baxter
12-31-2015, 07:12 PM
Funny, I'd never heard of Moonstruck before this thread, then just today a happy homeowner/client gave me this little box of liqueur truffles to share with my wife on New Years eve.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/LbCJWzlPb99_ZMisixt7AvALes1pz6sfCeg312Uu8AYRGR_56V piPjZb8o7gAutiA5Df-vaSB1DylTp2o_7TgEVGPkB-KDx2HuROnMlznmj7Php3PRBxnPEiVy6_hbMmCu4JnUsNPFO7qt kq_l_oHyhPdU-3d_ahFi6b4srXrd-sxJv9BpZ5tkYfXvQ9FQ0ynLUtUAmWdp-ymBpbqfSZEEFfBI-S6vogjKbTI5O1wAkD56aFc5ym6GOnuEAAPH4_dx9bNpnINo82w 38Rme8iZOG8hC5rwEQPQW7lR03Zn7_a45uFs9Dfq03IqValsVp 4eaS81C1lDvXFgnyGIQDlCq2ek__4ruCTHG9X4W1qZ3x3K9ruk CMDYeXkknW5XAxkls_2hgbhjzCx07hz7sTnB971bNMUwy1Phl_ CgXZPm72dsNqxR65CTMD37w9nksPeD2MO2Mvgp0U9biDFWJtjR rOzQlmBpM1V-uUjDO2CBCu4acftyyliwPE9eZoXOgcZga66Czc6vusDwQi73wL JUIaTL63p4eucLVDqQLL32FNWDXJJcGW3NSIyNbi-p9hy0EJXug=w538-h955-no

Dave Gray
12-31-2015, 07:29 PM
This is my favorite brownie recipe:

Brownies:
---------
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
6 ounces unsweetened chocolate
2 cups sugar
4 large eggs
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Frosting:
---------
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
2 cups confectioners' sugar
1/4 cup heavy cream
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Glaze:
------
4 ounces unsweetened chocolate
3 tablespoons unsalted butter

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Butter a 9x13 inch pan. If desired,
you can line the pan with buttered parchment paper cut to fit the bottom;
this will make it easier to get the brownies out.

In a small saucepan over very low heat or in the top of a double boiler
melt the butter and unsweetened chocolate. While the mixture cools, beat
the sugar, eggs, and salt for 8 minutes. Fold in the chocolate mixture,
then the flour and vanilla extract. Pour the batter into the prepared pan
and bake for 30 minutes, or just until the mixture pulls away from the
sides of the pan. Cool thoroughly.

To make the frosting, melt the butter over low heat, stirring constantly,
until it turns caramel in color. Remove it from the heat. Immediately
beat in the confectioners' sugar, heavy cream, and vanilla extract. Frost
the brownies while this mixture is still warm. Cool to room temperature.

The last layer is the glaze. In a small saucepan over very low heat or in
the top of a double boiler, melt the unsweetened chocolate and butter. Pour
the glaze over the top of the frosting layer. (The best way to do this is
to pour the chocolate on and tilt the pan back and forth until the frosting
is covered with glaze.)

When the glaze has hardened (it will take an hour or two), cut the brownies
into squares. It is easier to do this neatly while the brownies are still
at room temperature. Chill the brownies thoroughly and serve them cold.
Makes 24 2-inch squares or 48 1x2 inch rectangles.